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Politicians in Trouble: D

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  Clarence Seward Darrow (1857-1938) — also known as Clarence S. Darrow — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Kinsman, Trumbull County, Ohio, April 18, 1857. Democrat. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1896; member of Illinois state house of representatives 17th District, 1903-05; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1904, 1924. Member, American Civil Liberties Union. Defense attorney for, among many others, Patrick Eugene Prendergast, who murdered Chicago mayor Carter H. Harrison. In 1911, he was charged with bribing jurors in a California case; tried and acquitted; a second trial resulted in a hung jury. Famously cross-examined William Jennings Bryan during the 1925 "Scopes Monkey Trial.". Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., March 13, 1938 (age 80 years, 329 days). Cremated; ashes scattered; statue at Rhea County Courthouse Grounds, Dayton, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Amirus Darrow and Emily (Eddy) Darrow.
  Cross-reference: William B. Lloyd
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books by Clarence Darrow: Why I Am an Agnostic and Other Essays — The Story of My Life
  Books about Clarence Darrow: Arthur Weinberg, ed., Attorney for the Damned: Clarence Darrow in the Courtroom — Mike Papantonio, Clarence Darrow, the journeyman — Irving Stone, Clarence Darrow for the Defense — Richard J. Jensen, Clarence Darrow : The Creation of an American Myth — Geoffrey Cowan, The People v. Clarence Darrow : The Bribery Trial of America's Greatest Lawyer
  Harry Micajah Daugherty (1860-1941) — also known as Harry M. Daugherty — of Washington Court House, Fayette County, Ohio; Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Born in Washington Court House, Fayette County, Ohio, January 26, 1860. Republican. Lawyer; Fayette County Prosecuting Attorney; member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1890-94; delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1904, 1908, 1912, 1924; U.S. Attorney General, 1921-24. Methodist. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Subject of a Senate investigation of his conduct as Attorney General; resigned under fire; indicted on charges of conspiracy to defraud the U.S. government, but acquitted in 1927. Died in Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio, October 12, 1941 (age 81 years, 259 days). Interment at Washington Cemetery, Washington Court House, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of John H. Daugherty and Jane A. (Draper) Daugherty; married, September 3, 1884, to Lucie Walker.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books by Harry M. Daugherty: Inside Story of the Harding Tragedy (1932)
  Samuel W. Davies (c.1776-1843) — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in England, about 1776. Mayor of Cincinnati, Ohio, 1833-43. Tried by the city council in 1842 for mishandling a bank riot, and found guilty, but excused due to poor health. Died December 22, 1843 (age about 67 years). Burial location unknown.
  Joseph Hamilton Daviess (1774-1811) — also known as Joe Daviess — of Danville, Boyle County, Ky.; Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Bedford County, Va., March 4, 1774. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Kentucky, 1800-06; major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Welsh ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Around 1801, he served as a second to John Rowan in his duel with James Chambers; after Chambers was killed, he fled to avoid prosecution as accomplice to murder, and became a fugitive, but when Rowan was arrested, he returned to act as Rowan's legal counsel. Shot and killed in the Battle of Tippecanoe, in what is now Tippecanoe County, Ind., November 7, 1811 (age 37 years, 248 days). Interment at Tippecanoe Battlefield Park, Battle Ground, Ind.
  Relatives: Brother-in-law of John Marshall (1755-1835).
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Biddle-Randolph family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Anderson-Marshall family of Ohio and West Virginia; Pendleton-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Daviess counties in Ind., Ky. and Mo., and Jo Daviess County, Ill., are named for him.
  Angela Yvonne Davis (b. 1944) — also known as Angela Davis — Born in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala., January 26, 1944. Communist. Following a violent escape attempt at the Marin County (California) Hall of Justice, August 7, 1970, in which several people were killed, she was implicated as an accomplice and fled; later arrested in New York, tried, and acquitted in 1972; awarded the Lenin Peace Prize in 1979; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1980, 1984; during the Communist coup against Mikhail Gorbachev in 1991, she supported Gorbachev, and subsequently left the Communist Party; university professor. Female. African ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Daughter of Sallye E. Davis; brother of Ben Davis (professional football player).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Benjamin Jefferson Davis, Jr. (1903-1964) — also known as Benjamin J. Davis, Jr.; Ben Davis — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga.; Harlem, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Dawson, Terrell County, Ga., September 8, 1903. Communist. Lawyer; candidate for New York state senate 18th District, 1936; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York at-large, 1942; candidate for New York state attorney general, 1946; arrested in 1948, along with other party leaders, and charged with advocating the violent overthrow of the United States; convicted in 1949, and expelled from his New York city council seat; served more than three years in prison. African ancestry. Died, from lung cancer, in Beth Israel Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., August 22, 1964 (age 60 years, 349 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Jefferson Davis (1870-?).
  See also Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Edmund Jackson Davis (1827-1883) — also known as Edmund J. Davis — of Texas. Born in St. Augustine, St. Johns County, Fla., October 2, 1827. Republican. District judge in Texas, 1856-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1866; Governor of Texas, 1870-74; defeated, 1873, 1880; member of Republican National Committee from Texas, 1872-74; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas 10th District, 1882. After his defeat as Governor, he refused to give up the office, and barricaded himself in the state capitol. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., February 7, 1883 (age 55 years, 128 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of Forbes N. Britton (1820?-1861).
  Cross-reference: J. Goldsteen Dupree
  Books about Edmund J. Davis: Carl H. Moneyhon, Edmund J. Davis of Texas: Civil War General, Republican Leader, Reconstruction Governor
  George Davis (1820-1896) — of Wilmington, New Hanover County, N.C. Born in Porter's Neck, Pender County, N.C., March 1, 1820. Lawyer; Delegate from North Carolina to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Senator from North Carolina in the Confederate Congress, 1862-64; Confederate Attorney General, 1864-65. Episcopalian. At the end of the Civil War, with other Confederate officials, attempted to flee overseas, but turned himself in at Key West, Fla.; spent several months in prison at Fort Hamilton; pardoned in 1866. Died in Wilmington, New Hanover County, N.C., February 23, 1896 (age 75 years, 359 days). Interment at Oakdale Cemetery, Wilmington, N.C.; statue erected 1911 at Third and Market Streets, Wilmington, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Frederick Davis (1778-1846) and Sarah Isabella (Eagles) Davis (1784-1829); half-brother and fourth cousin of Horatio Davis; married, November 17, 1842, to Mary Adelaide Polk (1817-1863; first cousin once removed of Frank Lyon Polk (1871-1943); second cousin once removed of James Knox Polk and William Hawkins Polk; third cousin of Marshall Tate Polk); married, May 9, 1866, to Monimia Fairfax (1837-1889); great-grandnephew of Samuel Ashe; cousin four different ways of John Baptista Ashe (1748-1802), John Baptista Ashe (1810-1857), Thomas Samuel Ashe and William Shepperd Ashe; cousin three different ways of Alfred Moore Waddell; second cousin twice removed of William Henry Hill.
  Political families: Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina; Polk family; Manly-Haywood-Polk family of Raleigh, North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Jeff Davis Jefferson Davis (1862-1913) — also known as Jeff Davis — of Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark. Born in Little River County, Ark., May 6, 1862. Democrat. Arkansas state attorney general, 1899-1901; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Arkansas, 1900, 1904, 1912; Governor of Arkansas, 1901-07; U.S. Senator from Arkansas, 1907-13; died in office 1913; in December 1907, it was disclosed that he had hired his own daughters for two positions on his Senate staff; the scandal discredited him and ended his influence in the Senate. Died, from apoplexy, in Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark., January 3, 1913 (age 50 years, 242 days). Interment at Mt. Holly Cemetery, Little Rock, Ark.
  Presumably named for: Jefferson Davis
  Relatives: Son of Lewis W. Davis and Mary Davis; married 1882 to Ina McKenzie; married 1911 to Leila Carter.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, November 1902
Jefferson Davis Jefferson Finis Davis (1808-1889) — also known as Jefferson Davis — of Warrenton, Warren County, Miss.; Warren County, Miss. Born in a log cabin, Fairview, Christian County (now Todd County), Ky., June 3, 1808. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; candidate for Mississippi state house of representatives, 1843; Presidential Elector for Mississippi, 1844; U.S. Representative from Mississippi at-large, 1845-46; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1847-51, 1857-61; candidate for Governor of Mississippi, 1851; U.S. Secretary of War, 1853-57; President of the Confederacy, 1861-65. Captured by Union forces in May 1865 and imprisoned without trial for about two years. Died of bronchitis and malaria in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., December 6, 1889 (age 81 years, 186 days). Original interment at Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, La.; reinterment in 1893 at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.; memorial monument at Memorial Avenue, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Emory Davis and Jane (Cook) Davis; married, June 17, 1835, to Sarah Knox Taylor (1814-1835; daughter of Zachary Taylor); married, February 25, 1845, to Varina Howell (1826-1906; granddaughter of Richard Howell (1754-1802)); uncle of Mary Bradford (who married Richard Brodhead); granduncle of Jefferson Davis Brodhead and Frances Eileen Hutt (who married Thomas Edmund Dewey).
  Political families: Brodhead-Taylor family of Easton, Pennsylvania; Davis-Howell-Morgan-Agnew family of New Orleans and Shreveport, Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Jesse D. Bright — John H. Reagan — Horace Greeley — Solomon Cohen — George W. Jones — Samuel A. Roberts — William T. Sutherlin — Victor Vifquain — Charles O'Conor
  Jeff Davis County, Ga., Jefferson Davis Parish, La., Jefferson Davis County, Miss. and Jeff Davis County, Tex. are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: J. Davis BrodheadJefferson D. HostetterJefferson D. BlountJeff DavisJefferson D. HelmsJefferson Davis Parris
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States 50 cent notes in 1861-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Jefferson Davis: The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government (1881)
  Books about Jefferson Davis: William J. Cooper, Jr., Jefferson Davis, American : A Biography — Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis : Ex-President of the Confederate States of America : A Memoir by His Wife — William C. Davis, An Honorable Defeat: The Last Days of the Confederate Government — James Ronald Kennedy & Walter Donald Kennedy, Was Jefferson Davis Right? — Robert Penn Warren, Jefferson Davis Gets His Citizenship Back — Herman Hattaway & Richard E. Beringer, Jefferson Davis, Confederate President — Felicity Allen, Jefferson Davis: Unconquerable Heart — Clint Johnson, Pursuit: The Chase, Capture, Persecution, and Surprising Release of Confederate President Jefferson Davis
  Image source: Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, March 9, 1861
  Jonathan McMillan Davis (1871-1943) — also known as Jonathan M. Davis — of Bronson, Bourbon County, Kan. Born in Bronson, Bourbon County, Kan., April 27, 1871. Democrat. Farmer; member of Kansas state house of representatives, 1905-13; member of Kansas state senate, 1913-17; Governor of Kansas, 1923-25; defeated, 1920, 1924, 1926, 1936 (primary), 1938 (Independent); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kansas, 1924 (member, Committee on Permanent Organization); candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1924; candidate for U.S. Senator from Kansas, 1930. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Knights of Pythias; Eagles; Moose; Elks; Kiwanis. Arrested the day after his gubernatorial term expired; indicted twice for bribery; tried and acquitted both times. Died June 27, 1943 (age 72 years, 61 days). Interment at Bronson Cemetery, Bronson, Kan.
  Relatives: Son of Jonathan McMillan Davis and Eve (Holeman) Davis; married, September 26, 1894, to Mollie Purdom (died 1926); married, December 16, 1931, to Mary E. (Winston) Raymond.
  Lloyd Davis (c.1915-2001) — of South Pasadena, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., about 1915. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; superior court judge in California, 1967-70. Catholic. Member, Sierra Club. On October 26, 1969, he stabbed his wife, Mary Troja Davis, with a 9-inch butcher knife; she recovered. Charged with felony assault to commit murder; tried in 1970 and found not guilty by reason of insanity. Years later, he attributed the incident to a skin cancer drug. Died in South Pasadena, Los Angeles County, Calif., December 22, 2001 (age about 86 years). Burial location unknown.
  Roger Alfred Davis (1889-1967) — also known as Roger A. Davis — of Hartly, Kent County, Del. Born in Delaware, March 2, 1889. Grocer; member of Delaware state house of representatives from Kent County 4th District, 1931-32, 1953-54; arrested, in April 1954, by Maryland State Police, on U.S. Route 50, and charged with drunk and reckless driving, as well as disorderly conduct; jailed overnight, pleaded guilty, and fined. Died in Hartly, Kent County, Del., December 6, 1967 (age 78 years, 279 days). Interment at Odd Fellows Cemetery, Camden, Del.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Alfred Davis (1845-1928) and Sarah Ann (Jones) Davis (1850-1937); married 1918 to Hannah Boulden Kirk (1895-1971); father of Roger Elmer Davis; third cousin thrice removed of Daniel Rodney and Caleb Rodney (1767-1840).
  Political families: Rodney family of Delaware; Lawrence-Andrew-Rodney-Parrish family of Adel, Georgia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Scott Winfield Davis — also known as Scott W. Davis — of Palo Alto, Santa Clara County, Calif. Arrested in 1996, in Atlanta, Georgia, and charged with killing David Coffin and setting fire to his home; the charges were later dropped for lack of evidence; Independent candidate for Governor of California, 2003. Still living as of 2003.
  John W. Dawson (1820-1877) — of Fort Wayne, Allen County, Ind. Born in Cambridge, Dearborn County, Ind., October 21, 1820. Farmer; lawyer; newspaper editor; candidate for Indiana state house of representatives, 1854; candidate for secretary of state of Indiana, 1856; candidate for U.S. Representative from Indiana, 1858; Governor of Utah Territory, 1861. In December, 1861, after less than a month as territorial governor, fled Utah amid controversy and scandal. Just east of Salt Lake City, he was attacked by three men and badly injured. Died in Indiana, September 10, 1877 (age 56 years, 324 days). Interment at Lindenwood Cemetery, Fort Wayne, Ind.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jonathan Dayton (1760-1824) — of Elizabethtown, Essex County (now Elizabeth, Union County), N.J. Born in Elizabethtown, Essex County (now Elizabeth, Union County), N.J., October 16, 1760. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Essex County, 1786-87, 1790, 1814-15; Delegate to Continental Congress from New Jersey, 1787-89; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Representative from New Jersey at-large, 1791-99; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1795-99; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1799-1805. Episcopalian. Member, Society of the Cincinnati; Freemasons. Arrested in 1807 on charges of conspiring with Aaron Burr in treasonable projects; gave bail and was released, but never brought to trial. Died in Elizabethtown, Essex County (now Elizabeth, Union County), N.J., October 9, 1824 (age 63 years, 359 days). Entombed at St. John's Churchyard, Elizabeth, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Elias Dayton (1737-1807); distant relative *** of William Lewis Dayton.
  Political family: Dayton family of Elizabeth, New Jersey.
  The city of Dayton, Ohio, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  C. Leon de Aryan — of San Diego, San Diego County, Calif. Candidate for mayor of San Diego, Calif., 1932. Charged with sedition during World War II; the charges were eventually dropped. Burial location unknown.
Eugene V. Debs Eugene Victor Debs (1855-1926) — also known as Eugene V. Debs — of Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind. Born in Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind., November 5, 1855. Socialist. Locomotive fireman on the Terre Haute and Indianapolis Railroad; secretary-treasurer of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen in 1880-93; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1885; founder in 1893 and president (1893-97) of the American Railway Union; arrested during a strike in 1894 and charged with conspiracy to commit murder; the charges were dropped, but he was jailed for six months for contempt of court; became a Socialist while incarcerated; candidate for President of the United States, 1900 (Social Democratic), 1904 (Socialist), 1908 (Socialist), 1912 (Socialist), 1920 (Socialist); in 1905, was a founder of the Industrial Workers of the World ("Wobblies"), which hoped to organize all workers in "One Big Union"; convicted under the Sedition and Espionage Act for an anti-war speech he made in 1918, and sentenced to ten years in federal prison; released in 1921. Member, Knights of Pythias; American Civil Liberties Union. Died in Lindlahr Sanitarium, Elmhurst, DuPage County, Ill., October 20, 1926 (age 70 years, 349 days). Interment at Highland Lawn Cemetery, Terre Haute, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Daniel Debs and Marguerite (Betterich) Debs; married, June 9, 1885, to Katherine 'Kate' Metzel (step-sister-in-law of Bertha D. Baur (1870-1967)).
  Cross-reference: Victor L. Berger — William A. Cunnea
  See also NNDB dossier
  Books about Eugene V. Debs: James Chace, 1912 : Wilson, Roosevelt, Taft and Debs : The Election that Changed the Country — Charles W. Carey, Jr., Eugene V. Debs : Outspoken Labor Leader and Socialist (for young readers)
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, September 1908
  Carl F. DeLano (1890-1952) — of Cooper Township, Kalamazoo County, Mich. Born in Cooper Township, Kalamazoo County, Mich., September 25, 1890. Republican. Member of Michigan state house of representatives from Kalamazoo County 2nd District, 1931-38; defeated in primary, 1928; member of Michigan state senate 6th District, 1939-45; resigned 1945; charged on December 6, 1944, along with four other legislators, with accepting bribes from naturopathic phyisicians; tried in 1945 and convicted; sentenced to three to five years in prison; charged on July 20, 1946 (along with 18 other legislators) with accepting bribes to vote against a banking bill, but the entire case collapsed when the star prosecution witness, Charles F. Hemans, refused to testify. Died in 1952 (age about 61 years). Interment at Cooper Township Cemetery, Cooper Township, Kalamazoo County, Mich.
  Relatives: Married 1923 to Irene Lane.
  Thomas Dale DeLay (b. 1947) — also known as Tom DeLay; "The Hammer"; "Hot Tub Tom" — of Lake Jackson, Brazoria County, Tex.; Sugar Land, Fort Bend County, Tex. Born in Laredo, Webb County, Tex., April 8, 1947. Republican. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1979-85; U.S. Representative from Texas 22nd District, 1985-; delegate to Republican National Convention from Texas, 1988; indicted in 2005 on criminal conspiracy and money laundering charges; the conspiracy charge was later dismissed; trial pending. Baptist. Member, Rotary. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier — Encyclopedia of American Loons
  Books by Tom DeLay: No Retreat, No Surrender : One American's Fight, with Stephen Mansfield (2007)
  Critical books about Tom DeLay: Lou Dubose & Jan Reid, The Hammer : God, Money, and the Rise of the Republican Congress
  Ronald Vernie Dellums (1935-2018) — also known as Ronald V. Dellums — of Berkeley, Alameda County, Calif.; Oakland, Alameda County, Calif. Born in Oakland, Alameda County, Calif., November 24, 1935. Democrat. Social worker; U.S. Representative from California, 1971-98 (7th District 1971-75, 8th District 1975-93, 9th District 1993-98); arrested during an anti-apartheid protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1988, 1996, 2008; mayor of Oakland, Calif., 2007-11. Protestant. African ancestry. Member, Alpha Phi Alpha. Died in Washington, D.C., July 30, 2018 (age 82 years, 248 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Married to Leola Roscoe Higgs.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frank P. Demarest — of Mont Moor, Rockland County, N.Y.; West Nyack, Rockland County, N.Y. Member of New York state assembly from Rockland County, 1888-89, 1891, 1900. Indicted several times on various offenses in 1891-03; tried in 1903 and acquitted; indicted on fraud charges in 1904; he had presented claims against the Town of Clarkstown for services he had not provided; tried in Rockland County and convicted on November 18, 1904. Burial location unknown.
  Charles W. Dempster (c.1879-1941) — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa, about 1879. Republican. Lawyer; member of Montana state house of representatives, 1901-02; Supreme Secretary of the Fraternal Brotherhood, an insurance union; on February 1, 1917, when he was ousted by the brotherhood's Supreme Council on grounds of insubordination, he drew a revolver and held the council at bay for ten minutes; after being disarmed by a private detective, he was arrested for disturbing the peace; candidate in primary for California state senate 31st District, 1920; member of California state assembly, 1931-34 (57th District 1931-32, 61st District 1933-34); candidate for mayor of Los Angeles, Calif., 1932, 1933 (primary). Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Elks; Odd Fellows; Eagles. Died in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., July 20, 1941 (age about 62 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Grace Warner.
  Henry Herman Denhardt (1876-1937) — also known as Henry H. Denhardt — of Bowling Green, Warren County, Ky. Born in Bowling Green, Warren County, Ky., March 8, 1876. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1923-27; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1924; shot and injured on Election Day 1931.; his girlfriend, Mrs. Verna Garr Taylor, was found shot to death in November 1936; he was charged with murder and tried in New Castle, Ky.; the jury could not reach a verdict. Before he could be tried a second time, he was shot and killed, at the Armstrong Hotel, Shelbyville, Shelby County, Ky., September 20, 1937 (age 61 years, 196 days). Interment at Fairview Cemetery, Bowling Green, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Margaret (Geiger) Denhardt (1838-1901) and William Denhardt (1845-1900).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edward James Dennis (c.1876-1930) — also known as E. J. Dennis — of Berkeley County, S.C. Born about 1876. Member of South Carolina state senate from Berkeley County, 1911-14, 1927-30; died in office 1930. Tried and acquitted in 1929 for conspiracy to violate the alcohol prohibition law. Shot and mortally wounded by W. L. Thornley, on the street in front of the post office in Moncks Corner, S.C., and died the next day in a hospital at Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., July 25, 1930 (age about 54 years). Burial location unknown.
  Eugene Dennis (1905-1961) — also known as Francis Xavier Waldron; Tim Ryan — Born in Seattle, King County, Wash., August 10, 1905. Communist. Union organizer; fled to the Soviet Union in 1929 to avoid prosecution; returned to the U.S. in 1935; General Secretary, Communist Party, 1946-59, and Chairman, 1959-61; arrested in 1948, along with other party leaders, and charged with advocating the violent overthrow of the United States; convicted in 1949, and sentenced to five years in prison. Died, from cancer, in Mount Sinai Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., January 31, 1961 (age 55 years, 174 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park, Ill.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Harry Shuler Dent (1930-2007) — also known as Harry S. Dent — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in St. Matthews, Calhoun County, S.C., February 21, 1930. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Korean conflict; South Carolina Republican state chair, 1965-68; special counsel and political advisor to President Richard M. Nixon; pleaded guilty in 1974 to a federal campaign finance violation, and sentenced to one month probation. Baptist. Member, Phi Alpha Delta; Pi Kappa Alpha. Died, from complications of Alzheimer's disease, in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., September 28, 2007 (age 77 years, 219 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Hampton N. Dent and Sallie P. Dent; married to Betty Francis.
  See also NNDB dossier
Carmine G. DeSapio Carmine G. DeSapio (1908-2004) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., December 10, 1908. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1944, 1948, 1952, 1956; leader of Tammany Hall, 1949-61; leader of New York County Democratic Party, 1955; member of Democratic National Committee from New York, 1957; convicted in 1969 on Federal bribery conspiracy charges; served two years in prison. Italian ancestry. Member, Tammany Hall. Died, in St. Vincent's Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 27, 2004 (age 95 years, 230 days). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Woodside, Queens, N.Y.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Image source: New York Public Library
Samuel A. De_Witt Samuel Aaron De Witt (1891-1963) — also known as Samuel A. De Witt; Sam De Witt — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y.; Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in 1891. Socialist. Machinery dealer; poet; playwright; member of New York state assembly from Bronx County 3rd District, 1920; expelled 1920; resigned 1920; defeated, 1920 (Bronx County 3rd District), 1924 (Bronx County 7th District), 1926 (Bronx County 7th District), 1927 (Bronx County 3rd District), 1929 (Bronx County 3rd District), 1932 (Queens County 4th District), 1933 (Queens County 4th District); candidate for borough president of Bronx, New York, 1925; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1928 (22nd District), 1934 (2nd District), 1935 (2nd District), 1936 (2nd District). Expelled from the New York State Assembly over alleged disloyalty, along with the other four Socialist members, April 1, 1920; re-elected to the same seat in a special election, but resigned in protest when three other Socialist members were expelled again. Died in Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y., January 22, 1963 (age about 71 years). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Lorenzo de Zavala (1788-1836) — also known as Manuel Lorenzo Justiniano de Zavala y Sáenz — of Mérida, Yucatan; La Porte, Harris County, Tex. Born in Tecoh, Yucatan, October 3, 1788. Active in politics in Mexico, 1812-34; imprisoned in 1814-17 by Mexican authorities over his advocacy of democratic reforms; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Harrisburg, 1835; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Harrisburg, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; Vice President of the Texas Republic, 1836. Died, of pneumonia, November 15, 1836 (age 48 years, 43 days). Interment at de Zavala Family Cemetery, La Porte, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Anastasio de Zavala y Velázquez and Maria Bárbara Sáenz y Castro; married 1807 to Teresa Correa y Correa (died 1831); married, November 12, 1831, to Emily West.
  Zavala County, Tex. is named for him.
  Almar F. Dickson (1846-1915) — of Edgartown, Martha's Vineyard, Dukes County, Mass.; East Haddam, Middlesex County, Conn. Born in East Haddam, Middlesex County, Conn., January 20, 1846. Democrat. On August 1, 1874, in Oak Bluffs, Massachusetts, in response to the suspected seduction of his wife and her two sisters, he and his brother-in-law Caleb Smith were among a group of five men who, at midnight during a storm, attempted to kidnap at gunpoint Samuel K. Elliot, one of the supposed perpetrators, so they could tar and feather him; Elliot successfully defended himself from the group, and during the affray, Caleb Smith was shot dead; Elliot was ruled to have acted in self-defense, and denied any improper relations with the women; the scandal was widely publicized in the press; Dickson and his wife were divorced soon after; U.S. Consul in Gaspé Basin, 1887-1908; candidate for Connecticut state house of representatives from East Haddam, 1910, 1912. Died in Hartford, Hartford County, Conn., April 17, 1915 (age 69 years, 87 days). Interment at Moodus Cemetery, Moodus, East Haddam, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel S. Dickson (1812-1871) and Hannah 'Betsy' (Hill) Dickson (1816-1877); married, August 14, 1870, to Elizabeth Chase 'Lizzie' Smith (1852-1915); married, May 17, 1883, to Callie (Brainard) Wetherell (1863-1936); second cousin once removed of Charles Russell Kelsey; third cousin twice removed of David Kelsey and Elisha Kelsey; third cousin thrice removed of Henry Champion, Epaphroditus Champion and Joshua Coit; fourth cousin once removed of Ashbel Griswold, David Parmalee Kelsey and Samuel Townsend Douglass (1814-1898).
  Political families: Pendleton family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Porter-Kelsey family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel Dickstein (1885-1954) — also known as "Crook" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born near Vilna, Lithuania, February 5, 1885. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 4th District, 1919-22; U.S. Representative from New York, 1923-45 (12th District 1923-45, 19th District 1945); Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1945-53. Jewish. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; B'nai B'rith; Knights of Pythias; Elks; American Bar Association; Veterans of Foreign Wars. According to old Russian records found in the mid-1990s, he was a paid agent of the Soviet intelligence service while in Congress, and received some $12,000 in 1937-40 under the Soviet code-name "Crook". Died, in Beth Israel Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., April 22, 1954 (age 69 years, 76 days). Interment at Union Field Cemetery, Ridgewood, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Rabbi Israel Dickstein and Slata B. (Gordon) Dickstein.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  S. Samuel DiFalco (1906-1978) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Italy, July 26, 1906. Democrat. Lawyer; candidate in primary for New York state assembly, 1935; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1949-56; New York County Surrogate, 1957-76. Italian ancestry. Member, Tammany Hall. Indicted in May 1976, along with Justice Irving Saypol, on official misconduct charges, in connection with an alleged scheme to obtain appraisal and auction commissions for Saypol's son; the charges were later dismissed. Indicted in February 1978 for criminal contempt, in connection with his statements to a grand jury, but died before trial. Died, from a heart attack, while dining with friends at the Columbus Club, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., June 28, 1978 (age 71 years, 337 days). Interment at Gate of Heaven Cemetery, Hawthorne, N.Y.
  Charles Coles Diggs, Sr. (1894-1967) — also known as Charles C. Diggs, Sr. — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Tallula, Issaquena County, Miss., January 2, 1894. Mortician; member of Michigan state senate 3rd District, 1937-44; defeated in Democratic primary, 1944; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1940; charged on January 22, 1944 (along with 19 other current and former state legislators) with accepting bribes; tried, convicted, and sentenced to 3-5 years in prison; charged in a different bribery case in 1945; tried and convicted; charged again on July 20, 1946 (along with 18 other legislators) with accepting bribes to vote against a banking bill, but the entire case collapsed when the star prosecution witness, Charles F. Hemans, refused to testify; candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan 1st District, 1948 (Republican primary), 1952 (Democratic primary). African ancestry. Member, Elks. Died in 1967 (age about 73 years). Interment at Detroit Memorial Park East, Warren, Mich.
  Relatives: Father of Charles Coles Diggs, Jr. (1922-1998).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Charles C. Diggs, Jr. Charles Coles Diggs, Jr. (1922-1998) — also known as Charles C. Diggs, Jr. — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., December 2, 1922. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; mortician; member of Michigan state senate 3rd District, 1951-54; U.S. Representative from Michigan 13th District, 1955-80; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1976 (alternate); candidate for Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1956. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Elks; Freemasons; American Legion. First chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus; charged in March 1978 with taking kickbacks from staff whose salaries he raised; convicted, October 7, 1978, on eleven counts of mail fraud and filing false payroll forms; insisted he had done nothing wrong, and was re-elected while awaiting sentencing; censured by the House on July 31, 1979; sentenced to three years in prison and served 14 months. Died, of a stroke, at Greater Southwest Community Hospital, Washington, D.C., August 24, 1998 (age 75 years, 265 days). Interment at Detroit Memorial Park East, Warren, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Coles Diggs, Sr. (1894-1967).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
  Sheila Ann Dixon (b. 1953) — also known as Sheila Dixon; Sheila Dixon-Smith — of Baltimore, Md. Born in Baltimore, Md., December 27, 1953. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Maryland, 1988, 2004, 2008 (member, Credentials Committee); mayor of Baltimore, Md., 2007-10; resigned 2010. Female. African Methodist Episcopal. African ancestry. Indicted in January 2009, on perjury theft, and misconduct charges, over secretly accepting more than $20,000 worth of gifts from developers doing business with the city, and for using gift cards intended for needy families to buy furs and other expensive items for herself; the charges were dismissed in May, but she was reindicted in July; tried in fall 2009; convicted on one count of embezzlement, and acquitted on other charges; pleaded guilty to perjury, and resigned as mayor, as part of a plea agreement. Still living as of 2010.
  Relatives: Daughter of Philip Dixon, Sr. and Winona Dixon.
  See also Wikipedia article
Farrell Dobbs Farrell Dobbs (1907-1983) — of Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn.; New York. Born in Queen City, Schuyler County, Mo., July 25, 1907. Socialist. Truck driver; became involved with a militant Teamsters Union local in Minneapolis in the 1930s, and helped lead a general strike; joined the Socialist Workers Party in 1939; convicted in 1941 of treason under the anti-Communist Smith Act, and served one year in prison; Socialist Workers candidate for President of the United States, 1948, 1952, 1956, 1960; national secretary of the Socialist Workers Party, 1953-72; historian. Member, Teamsters Union. Died in Pinole, Contra Costa County, Calif., October 31, 1983 (age 76 years, 98 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Isaac T. Dobbs (1883-1956).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: The Militant, July 2, 1956
  Thomas Joseph Dodd (1907-1971) — also known as Thomas J. Dodd — of Lebanon, New London County, Conn.; West Hartford, Hartford County, Conn.; North Stonington, New London County, Conn. Born in Norwich, New London County, Conn., May 15, 1907. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Connecticut, 1948, 1952, 1956, 1960, 1968; U.S. Representative from Connecticut 1st District, 1953-57; U.S. Senator from Connecticut, 1959-71; defeated, 1956, 1970 (Dodd Independent). Catholic. Member, American Bar Association; Elks; Knights of Columbus. Censured by the Senate on June 23, 1967 for financial improprieties, having diverted some $116,000 in campaign and testimonial funds to his own use. Died of a heart attack, in Old Lyme, New London County, Conn., May 24, 1971 (age 64 years, 9 days). Interment at St. Michael's New Cemetery, Pawcatuck, Stonington, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas J. Dodd and Abigail (O'Sullivan) Dodd; married, May 19, 1934, to Grace Murphy; father of Christopher John Dodd (1944-).
  Political family: Dodd family of Norwich, Connecticut.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  John Charles Doerfer (1904-1992) — also known as John C. Doerfer — of West Allis, Milwaukee County, Wis.; Miami, Miami-Dade County, Fla.; Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis., November 30, 1904. Republican. Lawyer; member, Federal Communications Commission, 1953-60; chair, Federal Communications Commission, 1957-60; in 1960, he spent a week-long Florida vacation on the yacht Lazy Girl, owned by his friend George B. Storer, president of Storer Broadcasting; as a result, he was accused of conflict of interest and forced to resign. Died in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., June 5, 1992 (age 87 years, 188 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Ida Page (1902-1982).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Edward Laurence Doheny (1856-1935) — also known as Edward L. Doheny — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Fond du Lac, Fond du Lac County, Wis., August 10, 1856. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1920; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1920. Indicted in 1924 on federal bribery and conspiracy charges; he had given $100,000 to Secretary of the Interior Albert B. Fall, and soon after received a valuable contract to develop the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve in California. Though Fall was convicted of taking a bribe, Doheny was found not guilty. Died September 8, 1935 (age 79 years, 29 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Calvary Cemetery, Los Angeles, Calif.
  Cross-reference: Frank J. Hogan
  Stanley J. Dombrowski (1901-1977) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., May 7, 1901. Democrat. Member of Michigan state house of representatives from Wayne County 1st District, 1935-44; defeated in primary, 1950; in 1943, he repudiated grand jury testimony about being bribed, pleaded guilty to perjury, and was sentenced to prison; charged on January 22, 1944 (along with 19 other current and former state legislators) with accepting bribes; tried, convicted, and sentenced to 3-5 years in prison. Died in 1977 (age about 76 years). Burial location unknown.
  Raymond James Donovan (b. 1930) — Born August 31, 1930. U.S. Secretary of Labor, 1981-85. Charged with fraud on a subway construction project in the Bronx, New York City; tried in 1987 and found not guilty. Still living as of 2014.
  See also NNDB dossier
  Stephen Wallace Dorsey (1842-1916) — also known as Stephen W. Dorsey — of Helena (now part of Helena-West Helena), Phillips County, Ark.; Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark.; Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Benson, Rutland County, Vt., February 28, 1842. Republican. U.S. Senator from Arkansas, 1873-79; delegate to Republican National Convention from Arkansas, 1876, 1880. Indicted in 1881 for his participation in the Star Route frauds against the U.S. Post Office Department; tried twice in 1882-83 and ultimately acquitted. Died March 20, 1916 (age 74 years, 21 days). Interment at Fairmount Cemetery, Denver, Colo.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Kemp Doughton, Sr. (1884-1973) — of Sparta, Alleghany County, N.C. Born in Alleghany County, N.C., May 18, 1884. Banker; farmer; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1948-57; Speaker of the North Carolina State House of Representatives, 1951-57. Methodist. Indicted for bank fraud in 1928; tried and acquitted. Died, of pneumonia, in a hospital at Sparta, Alleghany County, N.C., March 17, 1973 (age 88 years, 303 days). Interment at Shiloh Methodist Church Cemetery, Sparta, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Rufus A. Doughton; nephew of Robert Lee Doughton (1863-1954).
  Political family: Doughton family of Sparta, North Carolina.
  Paul Louis Douglas (b. 1927) — also known as Paul L. Douglas — of Lincoln, Lancaster County, Neb. Born in Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County, S.Dak., September 19, 1927. Lancaster County Attorney, 1960-74; Nebraska state attorney general, 1975-84. Eastern Orthodox. Impeached by the Legislature in 1984 over his conduct in office and dealings with an officer of a failed savings and loan; acquitted by the state supreme court. Convicted of perjury in December, 1984 and resigned as Attorney General, but the conviction was later overturned. Still living as of 1984.
  Edward J. Dowling (b. 1875) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 8, 1875. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1916; member of New York state senate 19th District, 1917-20; defeated, 1920. Pleaded guilty in 1934 for embezzling $20,000 in Liberty bonds from an estate he represented as attorney; made restitution, resigned his law license, and received a suspended sentence. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married, June 27, 1906, to Anna McCooey (1878-1918; sister of John Henry McCooey (1864-1934)); married, February 7, 1924, to Clara Brady.
  Political family: McCooey-Ambro family of Brooklyn, New York.
  See also Wikipedia article
  David Dows (1885-1966) — also known as "Big Dave" — of Locust Valley, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y.; Bradley, Greenwood County, S.C. Born in Irvington, Westchester County, N.Y., August 12, 1885. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; worked in iron and steel mills; supervised construction of steel mills overseas; studied foreign industries as representative of a steamship line; horse breeder; bank director; Nassau County Sheriff, 1932-34; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1944; member, New York State Racing Commission, 1944-49; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 1956; South Carolina Republican state chair, 1956-58; candidate for Presidential Elector for South Carolina, 1956. Convicted of assault in 1913, over his treatment of a New York Times reporter who was attempting to interview him. Died in Hot Springs, Bath County, Va., August 13, 1966 (age 81 years, 1 days). Interment at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of David Dows (1857-1899) and Jane (Strahan) Dows (1859-1945); married, December 12, 1911, to Mary Gwendolyn Townsend Burden; married, May 19, 1937, to Emily Schweizer; father of Evelyn Byrd Dows (1912-1997; daughter-in-law of Cornelius Newton Bliss, Jr. (1874-1949)).
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Dows-Burden family of New York City, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Anthony Dreier — of Nanticoke, Luzerne County, Pa. Mayor of Nanticoke, Pa., 1953; convicted in 1953 on charges of soliciting and accepting a bribe for a police appointment. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Robert Jerry Dryfoos (1942-2006) — also known as Robert J. Dryfoos — of Forest Hills, Queens, Queens County, N.Y.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born August 11, 1942. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1972, 1980, 1988; chief counsel for New York Lt. Gov. Mary Ann Krupsak, 1975; member, New York City Council, 1980-91; retired from office while under investigation over alleged campaign finance and federal tax violations, but no charges were filed; lobbyist. Jewish. Member, Americans for Democratic Action; American Jewish Committee. Died, from complications of a head injury, in New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., March 2, 2006 (age 63 years, 203 days). Burial location unknown.
  William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (1868-1963) — also known as W. E. B. Du Bois — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Accra, Ghana. Born in Great Barrington, Berkshire County, Mass., February 23, 1868. College professor; sociologist; historian; civil rights leader; Pan-Africanist; one of the founders of the NAACP; received the Spingarn Medal in 1920; member of New York American Labor Party Executive Committee, 1949; American Labor candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 1950; in 1951, he and four other leaders of the Peace Information Center, which was alleged to be acting on behalf of the Soviet Union, were indicted for their failure to register as foreign agents; the case was dismissed in 1952, but his passport was withheld until 1958; awarded the Lenin Peace Prize in 1959. African ancestry. Member, NAACP. In 1895, he was the first African-American to receive a Ph.D. from Harvard University. Died in Accra, Ghana, August 27, 1963 (age 95 years, 185 days). Entombed at Du Bois Memorial Centre, Accra, Ghana.
  Relatives: Son of Alfred Du Bois and Mary Silvina (Burghardt) Du Bois; married, May 12, 1896, to Nina Gomer (1871-1950); married 1951 to Shirley Graham (1896-1977).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by W. E. B. Du Bois: The Souls of Black Folk
  William Ewing Duffield (1922-2001) — also known as William E. Duffield — of Pennsylvania. Born in Cherry Tree, Indiana County, Pa., January 7, 1922. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; served in the U.S. Army during the Korean conflict; lawyer; member of Pennsylvania state senate 32nd District, 1971-78. Presbyterian. Member, Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion; Freemasons; Elks. Disbarred in 1975 for mishandling cases and client funds; reinstated to the bar in 1978. Convicted in 1980 on 11 federal counts of mail fraud and one count of perjury; served six months in federal prison. Disbarred again in 1994 for mishandling a murder case. Died, of cancer and strokes, in Uniontown Hospital, Uniontown, Fayette County, Pa., January 14, 2001 (age 79 years, 7 days). Interment at Sylvan Heights Cemetery, Oliver, Pa.
  Victor Hugo Duras — also known as Victor H. Duras — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Nebraska. Republican. Candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1908 (12th District), 1910 (14th District); alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1912; U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul in Liège, 1913-14; U.S. Vice Consul in Petrograd, 1914-15; arrested in August, 1916, in Russia, on suspicion of being a German spy; freed in 1917. Burial location unknown.
  Presumably named for: Victor Hugo
  David Ferdinand Durenberger (b. 1934) — also known as David F. Durenberger — of South St. Paul, Dakota County, Minn.; Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn. Born in St. Cloud, Stearns County, Minn., August 19, 1934. Republican. Lawyer; executive secretary to Gov. Harold LeVander, 1967; U.S. Senator from Minnesota, 1978-95. Catholic. Member, Jaycees; Knights of Columbus; Elks; Lions. Investigated in 1990 by the Senate Select Committee on Ethics over allegations that he had broken rules restricting Senators' outside income, in particular by laundering about $100,000 in speaking fees into book royalties. Denounced by unanimous vote of the Senate in July 1990 for bringing "dishonor and disrepute" to the body. Subsequently he was disbarred; in 1995 he pleaded guilty to five misdemeanor counts of misusing his congressional expense account. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  John L. Duvall (1874-1962) — of Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind. Born in Tazewell County, Ill., November 29, 1874. Republican. Mayor of Indianapolis, Ind., 1926-27; resigned 1927. Convicted in 1927 of violating the state corrupt practices act by taking bribes from Ku Klux Klan leader D. C. Stephenson; sentenced to 30 days in jail, fined $1,000, and forced to resign as mayor. Died February 25, 1962 (age 87 years, 88 days). Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Ind.
  See also NNDB dossier
  James J. Dworak (b. 1935) — of Omaha, Douglas County, Neb. Born January 4, 1935. Democrat. Undertaker; mayor of Omaha, Neb., 1961-65; defeated, 1965; indicted on December 16, 1964, on charges of seeking thousands of dollars in bribes in connection with a rezoning request; tried in 1966 and acquitted. Still living as of 1997.
  Robert Budd Dwyer (1939-1987) — also known as R. Budd Dwyer — of Pennsylvania. Born in St. Charles, St. Charles County, Mo., November 21, 1939. Republican. Member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1965-70; member of Pennsylvania state senate 50th District, 1971-81; resigned 1981; Pennsylvania state treasurer, 1981-87; died in office 1987. Baptist. Member, National Education Association; Eagles; Theta Chi; Jaycees. Convicted in December 1986 of bribery and conspiracy in federal court. About to be sentenced, and widely expected to resign from office, he called a press conference; there, in front of spectators and television cameras, he insisted he was not guilty, and then shot and killed himself, in Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pa., January 22, 1987 (age 47 years, 62 days). Interment at Blooming Valley Cemetery, Blooming Valley, Pa.
  Cross-reference: Robert B. Asher
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  John Hugh Dyer, Jr. — also known as Buddy Dyer — of Orlando, Orange County, Fla. Born in Orlando, Orange County, Fla. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Florida state senate, 1993-2003; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1996, 2004, 2008; candidate for Florida state attorney general, 2002; mayor of Orlando, Fla., 2003-05, 2005-; indicted March 10, 2005, for illegally paying a campaign worker to collect absentee ballots in the 2004 mayoral election; suspended from office as mayor; on April 20, the charges were dropped, and he was reinstated; Presidential Elector for Florida, 2012. Member, Order of the Coif; Phi Delta Phi. Still living as of 2012.
  See also Wikipedia article
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
  The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
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