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The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble: 1930 to 1939

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in approximate chronological order

  Charles E. Bowles (1884-1957) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Yale, St. Clair County, Mich., March 24, 1884. Republican. Lawyer; recorder's court judge in Michigan, 1926-29; resigned 1929; mayor of Detroit, Mich., 1930; candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan 15th District, 1932, 1934; candidate for circuit judge in Michigan 3rd Circuit, 1941; candidate for Michigan state house of representatives from Wayne County 1st District, 1950, 1952. Member, Optimist Club. Recalled from office as Mayor in 1930 over charges that he had sold out to gangsters and the Ku Klux Klan. Died July 30, 1957 (age 73 years, 128 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Alfred Bowles and Mary (Lutz) Bowles; married, June 1, 1915, to Ruth Davis.
  William Zebulon Foster (1881-1961) — also known as William Z. Foster; William Edward Foster — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Taunton, Bristol County, Mass., February 25, 1881. Communist. Labor organizer; helped lead steelworkers strike in 1919; candidate for President of the United States, 1924, 1928, 1932; candidate for Governor of New York, 1930; arrested after a demonstration in 1930, and jailed for six months; indicted on July 20, 1948 under the Smith Act, and charged with conspiring to advocate the overthrow of the government; never tried due to illness. Irish ancestry. Died, in a sanatorium at Moscow, Russia, September 1, 1961 (age 80 years, 188 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Kremlin Wall Necropolis, Moscow, Russia; cenotaph at Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of James Foster; married to Ester Abramovitch.
  Epitaph: "Working Class Leader. Tireless Fighter for Socialism."
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jacob P. Nathanson (1901-1986) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Lake Worth, Palm Beach County, Fla. Born in Russia, February 21, 1901. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Kings County 14th District, 1927-33; defeated in primary, 1933. Jewish. Charged in 1930 with professional misconduct by the Brooklyn Bar Association, over his handling of a client's $500 bail payment; suspended from the practice of law in 1931, and ordered to pay restitution. Indicted in October and November 1938 on charges of forgery, grand larceny, and subornation of perjury, over his involvement in fraudulent bail bonds; pleaded guilty to subornation of perjury, and testified against other conspirators; disbarred in 1939. Died in Palm Beach County, Fla., March 2, 1986 (age 85 years, 9 days). Interment somewhere in Palm Beach County, Fla.
  Sammie A. Abbott (1908-1990) — of New York; Takoma Park, Montgomery County, Md. Born April 25, 1908. Communist. Activist and labor organizer; arrested about 50 times in connection with demonstrations and strikes; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 37th District, 1934; mayor of Takoma Park, Md., 1980-85; defeated, 1985. Died December 15, 1990 (age 82 years, 234 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1938 to Ruth Gracie Yalsic (1920-2009).
  J. O. Stricklin (1872-1930) — of Yazoo City, Yazoo County, Miss. Born July 9, 1872. Mayor of Yazoo City, Miss., 1929-30; died in office 1930. Indicted by a Yazoo County grand jury in 1929 for stealing a cow; details of the case were printed in the Yazoo Sentinel newspaper, leading to a feud between Stricklin and the Sentinel's editor, Frank R. Birdsall; a year later, on Main Street in front of the Sentinel office, Stricklin was talking with Dr. R. E. Hawkins, his opponent in the last election, when Birdsall approached; Stricklin pulled out a pistol, shot Birdsall three times (he died the next day), and shot at, but missed, Dr. Hawkins; he then went to his son's funeral parlor, where he died by a self-inflicted gunshot, in Yazoo City, Yazoo County, Miss., April 1, 1930 (age 57 years, 266 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery, Yazoo City, Miss.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Grover M. Moscowitz (1886-1947) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Hot Springs, Garland County, Ark., August 31, 1886. Lawyer; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of New York, 1925-47; died in office 1947; his practice of giving lucrative bankruptcy receiverships to members of his former partner's law firm was condemned as unethical by the U.S. House on April 8, 1930. Jewish. Member, Freemasons. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., March 31, 1947 (age 60 years, 212 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Son of Morris Moscowitz and Bertha (Less) Moscowitz; married 1911 to Miriam H. Greenebaum; father of Grover M. Moscowitz, Jr. (1916-1998).
  Cross-reference: William T. Cowin
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Ralph W. Chandless — of Bergen County, N.J. Member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Bergen County, 1924-28; Speaker of the New Jersey State House of Assembly, 1926; member of New Jersey state senate from Bergen County, 1929-30. Expelled from the state senate, December 5, 1930. Burial location unknown.
Frank D. McKay Frank D. McKay (1883-1965) — of Grand Rapids, Kent County, Mich. Born in Grand Rapids, Kent County, Mich., November 4, 1883. Republican. Financier; political boss who dominated Republican politics in Michigan for years; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1920, 1928, 1932 (alternate), 1936, 1940, 1944; Michigan state treasurer, 1925-30; investigated by a grand jury in 1931 over his handling of state funds while Treasurer; member of Republican National Committee from Michigan, 1940-44; subject of three federal grand jury investigations in 1940 over alleged fraud, extortion and kickbacks; indicted in 1944 for bribery of state legislators; hired a Purple Gang figure to murder the star witness, State Sen. Warren G. Hooper, and the case collapsed; charged in 1945, along with William McKeighan, with conspiracy to violate state liquor laws; tried in 1946; the judge directed a verdict of not guilty. Died in Miami Beach, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., January 12, 1965 (age 81 years, 69 days). Burial location unknown.
  Cross-reference: Edward N. Barnard — William Green
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1927
  Willis M. Brewer (1892-1972) — of Pontiac, Oakland County, Mich. Born in 1892. Democrat. Candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan 6th District, 1924; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1928 (alternate), 1952; candidate for secretary of state of Michigan, 1928; chairman, Oakland County Board of Auditors; in 1931, he was charged with embezzling $2,500 from the county; convicted, and sentenced to five to fifteen years in prison; his sentence was commuted by Gov. William A. Comstock in 1933; member of Michigan Democratic State Central Committee, 1947. Member, American Legion. Died in 1972 (age about 80 years). Burial location unknown.
  Smedley Darlington Butler (1881-1940) — also known as Smedley Butler; "The Fighting Quaker"; "Old Gimlet Eye" — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in West Chester, Chester County, Pa., July 30, 1881. Republican. Major general in U.S. Marine Corps; received a Medal of Honor for the capture of Veracruz, Mexico, 1914; received another for the capture of Fort Riviere, Haiti, 1915; Philadelphia police commissioner, 1924-25; arrested and court-martialed in 1931 over his unauthorized disclosure of an incident unflattering to Italian dictator Italian Benito Mussolini; retired from the service rather than apologize to Mussolini; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1932. Quaker. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., June 21, 1940 (age 58 years, 327 days). Interment at Oaklands Cemetery, West Chester, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Stalker Butler and Maud Mary (Darlington) Butler; married, June 30, 1905, to Ethel Conway Peters (1879-1962); grandson of Smedley Darlington and Samuel Butler; second great-grandnephew of Edward Darlington (1755-1825); first cousin thrice removed of Isaac Darlington, William Darlington (1782-1863), Esther Darlington (1793-1877; who married James B. Roberts), Edward Darlington (1795-1884) and William Darlington (1804-1879); second cousin twice removed of Edward C. Darlington; fourth cousin of Darlington Hoopes (1896-1989).
  Political family: Darlington-Butler family of West Chester, Pennsylvania.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Roy T. Yates (1895-1960) — of Passaic County, N.J.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Paterson, Passaic County, N.J., August 8, 1895. Republican. Banker; member of New Jersey Republican State Committee, 1925-27; member of New Jersey state senate from Passaic County, 1928-31; resigned 1931. Member, Freemasons; Junior Order; Patriotic Order Sons of America. Shot in the abdomen, on August 14, 1931, by Miss Ruth Cranmer, in her apartment in Manhattan, New York; this incident led to the discovery that Miss Cranmer, apparently his mistress, had also received checks from the State of New Jersey; the New Jersey State Senate Judiciary committee began an investigation into whether Sen. Yates should be impeached; but then he resigned. Died, of a heart ailment, in Doctors Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., March 8, 1960 (age 64 years, 213 days). Interment somewhere in Easton, Conn.
  Relatives: Married to Elsie Southrope.
  Dale Ray Andre (1889-1950) — of Iowa. Born in 1889. Member of Iowa state house of representatives, 1917. Was indicted in 1931 for misusing investment funds; found not guilty, but his career was wrecked. Died in 1950 (age about 61 years). Interment at Aspen Grove Cemetery, Burlington, Iowa.
  Frank E. Edwards — of Seattle, King County, Wash. Mayor of Seattle, Wash., 1928-31; recalled 1931. Recalled from office as mayor in 1931. Burial location unknown.
  Jesse Silbermann (1877-1947) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., June 30, 1877. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 32nd District, 1908-09; New York City Magistrate, 1920-31; removed from office in July 1931 by the Appellate Division, for being improperly influenced by a party leader in the sentencing of a defendant. Member, Elks; Freemasons. Died, in Mount Sinai Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 17, 1947 (age 69 years, 321 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Silbermann and Caroline Silbermann; married to Mabel Saunders.
  Rudolph Gabriel Tenerowicz (1890-1963) — also known as Rudolph G. Tenerowicz — of Hamtramck, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Budapest, Hungary, of Polish parents, June 14, 1890. Physician; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; mayor of Hamtramck, Mich., 1928-32, 1936-39; resigned 1932; U.S. Representative from Michigan 1st District, 1939-43; defeated, 1942 (Democratic primary), 1946 (Republican primary), 1948 (Republican), 1950 (Republican), 1952 (Republican), 1954 (Republican). Polish ancestry. Tried and convicted on vice conspiracy charges in 1932; freed from prison when pardoned by Gov. William A. Comstock. Died in Hamtramck, Wayne County, Mich., August 31, 1963 (age 73 years, 78 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of John Tenerowicz and Antoinette (Gall) Tenerowicz; brother of Anthony C. Tenerowicz; married to Margaret Tenerowicz (1916?-).
  Political family: Tenerowicz family of Hamtramck, Michigan.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Henry Bruckner (1871-1942) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Bronx, New York County (now Bronx County), N.Y., June 17, 1871. Democrat. President, Bruckner Beverages; director, Milton Realty Co.; director, American Metal Cap Co.; member of New York state assembly from New York County 35th District, 1901; New York City Commissioner of Public Works, 1902-06; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1912 (alternate), 1924, 1932 (alternate); U.S. Representative from New York 22nd District, 1913-17; resigned 1917; borough president of Bronx, New York, 1918-33. Member, Freemasons; Rotary; Elks. In 1932, the Seabury investigating committee, looking into corruption in New York City, called him to testify about the wealth he had accumulated; at the conclusion of the investigation, the committee called for his removal as Borough President. Died, from chronic nephritis, in Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., April 14, 1942 (age 70 years, 301 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John A. Bruckner and Katharine (Schmidt) Bruckner; married, November 17, 1904, to Helen Zobel (c.1879-1930).
  Bruckner Expressway, Bronx, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  James John Joseph Walker (1881-1946) — also known as James J. Walker; Jimmy Walker; "Beau James"; "The Night Mayor" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., June 19, 1881. Democrat. Lawyer; songwriter; member of New York state assembly from New York County 5th District, 1910-14; member of New York state senate, 1915-25 (13th District 1915-18, 12th District 1919-25); resigned 1925; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1924, 1928 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business), 1932; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1926-32; resigned 1932. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Member, Elks. Resigned as mayor during an investigation of corruption in his administration. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 18, 1946 (age 65 years, 152 days). Interment at Gate of Heaven Cemetery, Hawthorne, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of William H. Walker (1852?-?); married to Janet Allen (divorced 1933); married, April 18, 1933, to Betty Compton (actress; divorced 1941).
  See also Wikipedia article — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about Jimmy Walker: Gerald Leinwand, Mackerels in the Moonlight : Four Corrupt American Mayors
Samuel Insull Samuel Insull (1859-1938) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill.; Kenilworth, Cook County, Ill.; near Libertyville, Lake County, Ill. Born in London, England, November 11, 1859. Republican. Associate of Thomas Edison and executive of electric utilities; one of the founders of the company that became General Electric; also had major holdings in railroads; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1904; when his utility holding company collapsed, wiping out the stockholders, he fled the country; indicted in 1932 on fraud and embezzlement charges; ultimately extradited from Turkey in 1934; tried in Chicago and found not guilty. Congregationalist. Member, Union League. Died from a heart attack, in the Place de la Concorde station on the Paris Métro subway system, Paris, France, July 16, 1938 (age 78 years, 247 days). Interment at Putney Vale Cemetery, London, England.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Insull and Emma (Short) Insull; married, May 24, 1899, to Margaret A. Bird (1875-1953; actress, stage name 'Gladys Wallis').
  Cross-reference: Forest A. Harness
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Time Magazine, November 29, 1926
  Stanley J. Pacholek (1890-1932) — of Hamtramck, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Poland, December 8, 1890. Undertaker; candidate for mayor of Hamtramck, Mich., 1932. Polish ancestry. Arrested in April, 1932, for drunk driving; died by suicide in his jail cell, by hanging himself with his scarf, in Birmingham, Oakland County, Mich., April 19, 1932 (age 41 years, 133 days). Burial location unknown.
  John Clinton Porter (1871-1959) — also known as John C. Porter — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Leon, Decatur County, Iowa, 1871. Democrat. Telegraph operator; automobile accessories business; mayor of Los Angeles, Calif., 1929-33; defeated, 1933, 1941. Christian. Petitions for his recall as mayor were filed in 1932; petitioners, led by his political adversaries on city council, charged that "the Mayor is incompetent, inefficient and unsatisfactory" and that he "has brought ridicule and insult to Los Angeles and its citizenry by his conduct." The recall, and nine candidates who sought to replace him, was defeated. Died, of a lung and heart condition, in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., May 27, 1959 (age about 87 years). Interment at Forest Lawn Memorial Park - Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, Calif.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  William Montross Inglis (1875-1932) — also known as William M. Inglis — of Seattle, King County, Wash. Born in Clyde Township, St. Clair County, Mich., January 7, 1875. Republican. Colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I; delegate to Republican National Convention from Washington, 1924, 1928 (alternate). Killed by a single gunshot behind his ear, under mysterious circumstances, and posthumously accused of attempted murder, in Seattle, King County, Wash., October 22, 1932 (age 57 years, 289 days). The only witness, Mary Nash, who shared the apartment, said that he had been despondent and drinking heavily; that she had hidden his pistol, but he had found it; that without warning, he shot her twice (she was badly injured but survived), and then immediately killed himself; investigators questioned her story, and thought he might have been murdered, but she was not charged. Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Seattle, Wash.
  Relatives: Son of John Jacob Inglis (1848-1908) and Martha Ann (Montross) Inglis (1850-1927); married to Anne Hughes (died 1919).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Edward Powers (b. 1892) — also known as George E. Powers — of Watertown, Middlesex County, Mass.; Astoria, Queens, Queens County, N.Y.; Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., February 15, 1892. Sheet metal worker; candidate for borough president of Queens, New York, 1929 (Workers), 1933 (Communist); Workers candidate for U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1930; in April 1932, he was arrested at City Hall Park, during a demonstration which was characaterized as "riot"; convicted of unlawful assembly, but the sentence was suspended; also in 1932, he was publicly accused of taking part in an alleged Communist conspiracy to cause bank failures in Chicago by spreading rumors (in a "whispering campaign" of "anti-bank propaganda"); he denied this; Communist candidate for chief judge of New York Court of Appeals, 1932; vice-president, International Workers Order; following the Hitler-Stalin pact in 1939, he resigned from the Communist Party, took part in anti-Communist organizations; at Earl Browder's trial for passport fraud in 1940, he testified for the prosecution; Liberal candidate for New York state senate 7th District, 1948, 1950. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of George E. Powers and Sarah Powers.
  Bernard Ades (1903-1986) — of Baltimore, Md. Born in Maryland, July 3, 1903. Communist. Lawyer; accountant; defense attorney for Euel Lee (alias "Orphan Jones") in his 1932-33 trial for the murder of the Davis family; during the trial, Ades was attacked and injured by a mob in Snow Hill, Maryland; later, he was disbarred for casting aspersions on the judicial system; candidate for Governor of Maryland, 1934; fought in the Abraham Lincoln Brigade in the Spanish Civil War, 1937. Jewish. Died in New York, May 27, 1986 (age 82 years, 328 days). Interment at Cemetery of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, Baltimore, Md.
  Relatives: Son of Harry Ades and Fannie Ades.
  Books about Bernard Ades: Joseph E. Moore, Murder on Maryland's Eastern Shore: Race, Politics and the Case of Orphan Jones
  Ernest A. Moross (c.1874-1949) — of Mosherville, Hillsdale County, Mich. Born about 1874. Manager for Indianapolis Speedway, and for many early 20th century race car drivers; retired from automobile racing in 1916; candidate in Republican primary for Michigan state house of representatives from Hillsdale County, 1930; Communist candidate for Michigan state senate 10th District, 1932; in 1933, he refused to renew his car's license plates as a protest against the cost; when his car was seized, he and his wife locked the doors and remained inside it for a month; finally police broke into the car and arrested them; convicted of resisting arrest, and sentenced to 30 days in jail. Died in Long Beach, Los Angeles County, Calif., April 4, 1949 (age about 75 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Brother-in-law of Robert Oakman (1859?-?).
  Frank Frankel (1886-1975) — of Long Beach, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y.; Houston, Harris County, Tex.; Beverly Hills, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born October 2, 1886. Mayor of Long Beach, N.Y., 1924, 1930-33; defeated, 1925 (Democratic primary), 1925 (Republican), 1929 (Democratic primary); founder of Long Beach Memorial Hospital indicted in September 1927 on charges of maintaining a gambling place; the charges were later dropped; in December 1929, his right to take office as mayor was unsuccessfully challenged by the Long Beach police chief, based on vote fraud (for which many had been arrested and prosecuted) and the expectation that Frankel would tolerate gambling in the city; indicted in January 1933 for fraud over his transfer of $90,000 in city funds to the Long Beach Trust Company, which subsequently closed; the indictment was dismissed in February; indicted again in May 1933, along with two city council members, over the diversion of $750,000 of state and county tax revenue to city projects; pleaded not guilty; no trial was held; the indictment was dismissed in 1937; oil producer. Died, in a hospital at Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., June 12, 1975 (age 88 years, 253 days). Interment somewhere in Houston, Tex.
Williana J. Burroughs Williana Jones Burroughs (1882-1945) — also known as Williana J. Burroughs; Williana Jones; Mary Adams — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Moscow, Russia. Born in Petersburg, Va., December 26, 1882. Communist. School teacher; joined the Communist party in 1926; used the pseudonym "Mary Adams"; in 1933, she led a demonstration to the New York City Board of Education, and as a result, she was fired from her teaching job; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1934; announcer and editor for the English-language broadcasts of Radio Moscow, 1937-45. African ancestry. Died, from a heart ailment, in the Staten Island Area Hospital, Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., December 24, 1945 (age 62 years, 363 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1909 to Charles Burroughs.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: The Daily Worker, October 1933
Corliss Lamont Corliss Lamont (1902-1995) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Englewood, Bergen County, N.J., March 28, 1902. Socialist. Author; lecturer; arrested on June 27, 1934, while picketing in support of a labor union at a furniture plant in Jersey City, N.J.; president, National Council of American-Soviet Friendship; this organization and its leaders were investigated for subversion by the U.S. House Committee on Un-American Activities; charged in 1946 with contempt of Congress for his refusal to provide records demanded by the committee; in 1951, the U.S. State Department denied a passport to him, based on his membership in what were deemed "Communist-front organizations"; on August 17, 1954, the U.S. Senate cited him with contempt of Congress for refusing to testify before Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy's subcommittee; subsequently indicted; pleaded not guilty; the indictment was dismissed in 1955; the Court of Appeals upheld the dismissal in 1956; candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 1952 (American Labor), 1958 (Independent Socialist). Member, American Civil Liberties Union; NAACP; Phi Beta Kappa; American Academy of Political and Social Science. Died, of heart failure, in Ossining, Westchester County, N.Y., April 26, 1995 (age 93 years, 29 days). Interment at Brookside Cemetery, Englewood, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas William Lamont (1870-1948) and Florence Haskell (Corliss) Lamont (died 1952); married, June 8, 1928, to Margaret Hayes Irish (c.1905-1977); married 1962 to Helen Lamb (died 1975); married 1986 to Beth Keehner; granduncle of Ned Lamont (1966?-).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Militant, November 3, 1958
  William Dudley Pelley (1890-1965) — of Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C.; Noblesville, Hamilton County, Ind. Born in Lynn, Essex County, Mass., March 12, 1890. Hollywood screenwriter in 1917-29 for about 12 films, including The Light in the Dark and The Shock, both starring Lon Chaney; founder (1933) and leader of the anti-Semitic Silver Legion of America organization (the "Silver Shirts", explicitly modeled after Adolf Hitler's Brownshirts); Christian candidate for President of the United States, 1936; arrested in April 1942 and charged with criminal sedition; convicted and sentenced to fifteen years in prison; released in 1950. Died in Noblesville, Hamilton County, Ind., July 1, 1965 (age 75 years, 111 days). Interment at Crownland Cemetery, Noblesville, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Grace (Goodale) Pelley (born 1861) and William George Apsey Pelley (1867-1920); married, December 16, 1911, to Marion Harriet Stone (divorced); married, July 24, 1934, to Minna Helen Hansmann; married to Agnes Marion Henderson (1898-1970).
  Cross-reference: Gerald L. K. Smith
  See also Wikipedia article — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by William Dudley Pelley: Know your karma; design for destiny
  Charles E. MacMillin (1888-1941) — of Pinal County, Ariz. Born in Marengo, Iowa County, Iowa, January 21, 1888. Democrat. Pharmacist; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Speaker of the Arizona State House of Representatives, 1925. Member, American Legion. Convicted of forgery in 1934; sentenced to prison. Died March 2, 1941 (age 53 years, 40 days). Burial location unknown.
  Stephen J. Stilwell (1866-1942) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y.; Mamaroneck, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in New York, May 10, 1866. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state senate 21st District, 1909-13; removed 1913; charged in 1913 with extorting a bribe of $3,500 from George H. Kendall, president of the New York Bank Note company, over a bill that Kendall supported; tried in the State Senate and found not guilty on April 15 by a vote of 28 to 21; indicted on May 12 by a grand jury for soliciting a bribe; tried soon after, and convicted on May 24; this removed him from office; sentenced to four to eight years in prison; after his release, he moved to Mamaroneck and entered the real estate business; indicted in 1934 on charges that he defrauded his former stenographer of $9,000 when she came to him seeking a Naval Academy appointment for her son, but the case did not go to trial; arrested in March 1941 and indicted in April on charges that he attempted to bribe a Mamaroneck village trustee $1,000 to obtain a police job for an associate; pleaded guilty, but never sentenced; while incarcerated, his legs were amputated. Died, while a prisoner awaiting sentence, in Grasslands Hospital, Valhalla, Westchester County, N.Y., April 20, 1942 (age 75 years, 345 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Mary Delia (Archer) Stilwell (1833-1925) and William Jewitt Stilwell; married, February 14, 1887, to Celia A. Blanck.
Abdul Hamid Sufi Abdul Hamid (1903-1938) — also known as Abdul Hamid; Eugene Brown; "The Black Hitler"; "The Harlem Hitler"; "Bishop Amiru-Al-Mu-Minim Sufi Abdul Hamid" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Lowell, Middlesex County, Mass., January 6, 1903. Self-styled cleric; labor leader; claimed to be from Egypt or Sudan; wore a turban and a green velvet cloak with gold braid; led picketing of stores in Harlem whose proprietors refused to hire African-American employees; conducted street rallies in Harlem where he denounced Jews; said he was "the only one fit to carry on the war against the Jews"; Americo-Spanish candidate for New York state assembly from New York County 17th District, 1933; arrested in october 1934; tried and found guilty on misdemeanor charges of making a public speech without a permit, and selling books without a license, and sentenced to ten days in jail; later suspected of inciting the 1935 riot in Harlem, which led to injunctions against his activities; in January 1938, his estranged wife, Stephanie St. Clair, ambushed him outside his house, and shot at him five times, but he was not seriously hurt; founded the Buddhist Universal Holy Temple of Tranquility. Buddhist or Muslim. African ancestry. Killed, along with his pilot, when his Cessna J-5 airplane ran out of fuel and crashed near Wantagh, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., July 30, 1938 (age 35 years, 205 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: New York Times, August 1, 1938
  Tracy W. Southworth — of Monroe County, Mich. Democrat. Member of Michigan state house of representatives from Monroe County; elected 1930, 1932; arrested in June 1934, along with a lobbyist, Al Tobin, based on an allegation of bribery in connection with helping a trucking company obtain a license; four marked bills were found in his possession when he was arrested; he claimed the lobbyist had merely made him a loan of $100. Burial location unknown.
  Edward J. Dowling (b. 1875) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 8, 1875. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1916; member of New York state senate 19th District, 1917-20; defeated, 1920. Pleaded guilty in 1934 for embezzling $20,000 in Liberty bonds from an estate he represented as attorney; made restitution, resigned his law license, and received a suspended sentence. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married, June 27, 1906, to Anna McCooey (1878-1918; sister of John Henry McCooey (1864-1934)); married, February 7, 1924, to Clara Brady.
  Political family: McCooey-Ambro family of Brooklyn, New York.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Michael Joseph Hogan (1871-1940) — also known as Michael J. Hogan — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Rockville Centre, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 22, 1871. Republican. U.S. Representative from New York 7th District, 1921-23; defeated, 1922 (7th District), 1932 (at-large); trucking business; indicted in 1934 for accepting money from applicants for New York City plumbing licenses; convicted on federal charges in 1935 of accepting bribes from illegal immigrants and helping them file false affidavits, and sentenced to a year and a day in federal prison; testified in 1936 that he had assisted in a jury tampering conspiracy. Died in Rockville Centre, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., May 7, 1940 (age 69 years, 15 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Breitman (1916-1986) — also known as Albert Parker; Philip Blake; Chester Hofla; Anthony Massini; John F. Petrone; G. Sloane — of Newark, Essex County, N.J.; Detroit, Wayne County, Mich.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Newark, Essex County, N.J., February 28, 1916. Socialist. Became a socialist agitator in Newark, N.J., 1935; arrested about 1936 and charged with inciting riots; jailed for a week; founding member of the Socialist Workers Party, 1937; member of its National Committee, 1939-81; Socialist Workers candidate for U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1940, 1942, 1946, 1948, 1954; editor-in-chief of the weekly newspaper, The Militant, 1941-43, 1946-54; writer under several different pen names; Socialist Workers candidate for Presidential Elector for New Jersey, 1952; Socialist Workers candidate for Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1960, 1964. Member, International Typographical Union. Expelled from the Socialist Workers Party for "disloyalty," 1984. Died, following a heart attack, in Beekman Downtown Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., April 19, 1986 (age 70 years, 50 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Breitman and Pauline (Trattler) Breitman; married 1940 to Dorothea Katz (1914-2004).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Thomas Joseph O'Brien (1878-1964) — also known as Thomas J. O'Brien; "Blind Tom" — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., April 30, 1878. Democrat. Accountant; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1907-10, 1929-32; U.S. Representative from Illinois 6th District, 1933-39, 1943-64; died in office 1964; arrested in a police raid on a gambling establishment, 1935; Cook County Sheriff, 1939-42; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1960. Catholic. Member, Knights of Columbus. Died in Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., April 14, 1964 (age 85 years, 350 days). Interment at Queen of Heaven Cemetery, Hillside, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas O'Brien and Mary (Murphy) O'Brien; married, July 15, 1920, to Nettie Kaufer.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Frank Hague (1876-1956) — also known as "Sphinx of Jersey City"; "The Boss"; "The Leader" — of Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J. Born in Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J., January 17, 1876. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1916, 1932; mayor of Jersey City, N.J., 1917-47; member of Democratic National Committee from New Jersey, 1922-52; Vice-Chair of Democratic National Committee, 1929-39; delegate to New Jersey convention to ratify 21st amendment, 1933. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Member, Elks; Knights of Columbus. Powerful leader of Hudson County Democratic "machine"; famously quoted as declaring "I am the law!" Indicted for various crimes but never convicted. Died, from complications of bronchitis and asthma, in New York, New York County, N.Y., January 1, 1956 (age 79 years, 349 days). Entombed at Holy Name Cemetery, Jersey City, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of John D. Hague and Maragaret (Fagen) Hague; married, April 15, 1903, to Jennie W. Warner; uncle of Frank Hague Eggers (1901-1954).
  Opposition slogan (1939): "Home rule, not Hague rule."
  Books about Frank Hague: Richard J. Connors, A Cycle of Power : The Career of Jersey City Mayor Frank Hague — Gerald Leinwand, Mackerels in the Moonlight : Four Corrupt American Mayors
  George Thomas Bardwell (1901-1947) — also known as George Bardwell; Thomas George Bardwell — of Denver, Colo. Born in Lake City, Hinsdale County, Colo., October 18, 1901. Communist. Candidate for U.S. Representative from Colorado 1st District, 1934; arrested and prosecuted in the 1930s in connection with a strike; acquitted. Died in a hospital, Denver, Colo., January 19, 1947 (age 45 years, 93 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Wheat Ridge, Colo.
  Relatives: Son of George D. Bardwell (1866-1908) and Hannah J. (Cunningham) Bardwell (1873-1924); married, April 4, 1923, to Avelina Rella (divorced 1934).
  Paul Martin Pearson (1871-1938) — Born in Litchfield, Montgomery County, Ill., October 22, 1871. College professor; author; Governor of U.S. Virgin Islands, 1931-35; forced to resign in July, 1935 during a Congressional investigation of financial mismanagement in the Islands government. Suffered a stroke, and died a month later, March 26, 1938 (age 66 years, 155 days). Interment at Cypress Lawn Memorial Park, Colma, Calif.
  Relatives: Father of Drew Pearson (newspaper columnist).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John L. Lotsch (1881-1967) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Scranton, Lackawanna County, Pa. Born February 15, 1881. Republican. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 6th District, 1928. Arrested and indicted in 1935 on federal charges of taking bribes while serving as a special master overseeing a patent case; the case was dismissed in 1936, but he was immediately reindicted on an extortion charge; that indictment was thrown out by the Court of Appeals. Charged in 1938, with other officials of a defunct Brooklyn bank, with conspiracy to violate federal banking laws by accepting fees for granting loans; tried and convicted on three counts; sentenced to serve one year in jail; also disbarred. Pleaded guilty in 1939 to charges that he bribed federal judge Martin T. Manton, and testified at the judge's bribery trial. Died in 1967 (age about 86 years). Burial location unknown.
  Anthony J. Wilkowski (b. 1898) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., April 16, 1898. Democrat. Hardware store owner; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1932 (alternate), 1936, 1940; member of Michigan state senate 2nd District, 1933-38, 1945-46, 1949-50; defeated in primary, 1942 (3rd District), 1946 (2nd District), 1951 (2nd District), 1952 (2nd District), 1955 (2nd District); chair of Wayne County Democratic Party, 1934; tried and convicted, along with Democratic state chairman Elmer B. O'Hara, on vote fraud charges in 1936, and sentenced to four to five years in prison; member of Michigan Democratic State Central Committee, 1939; candidate in primary for Lieutenant Governor of Michigan, 1940; delegate to Michigan state constitutional convention from Wayne County 9th District, 1961-62. Catholic. Polish ancestry. Member, Knights of Columbus; Polish National Alliance. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Anton Wilkowski and Veronica (Skelnik) Wilkowski; brother of Leo Joseph Wilkowski (1902-1955); married, February 10, 1945, to Ann Chrzanowski.
  John Henry Hoeppel (1881-1976) — also known as John H. Hoeppel — of Arcadia, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born near Tell City, Perry County, Ind., February 10, 1881. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; U.S. Representative from California 12th District, 1933-37; defeated (Prohibition), 1946. Catholic. Member, Elks; Moose; American Legion; United Spanish War Veterans; Veterans of Foreign Wars. Convicted in 1936 of conspiring to sell an appointment to West Point; sentenced to prison. Died at Huntington Care Center, Arcadia, Los Angeles County, Calif., September 21, 1976 (age 95 years, 224 days). Interment at Resurrection Cemetery, San Gabriel, Calif.
  Relatives: Married, November 11, 1907, to Annie Seitz.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Ernest Lee Jahncke (1877-1960) — also known as "Commodore" — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., October 13, 1877. Republican. Engineer; president, Jahncke Dry Docks, New Orleans; U.S. assistant secretary of the Navy, 1929-33; named a Commodore in 1931, and a Rear Admiral in the naval reserve in 1955; delegate to Republican National Convention from Louisiana, 1932, 1936 (alternate). Episcopalian. German ancestry. Member, Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Expelled from the International Olympic Committee in July 1936 after taking a strong stand against the Nazi-organized Berlin Games. Died in Pass Christian, Harrison County, Miss., November 16, 1960 (age 83 years, 34 days). Entombed at Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Son of Frederick 'Fritz' Jahncke (1847-1911) and Margaret (Lee) Jahncke (1853-1913); brother of Walter Frederick Jahncke (1880-1947); married, June 1, 1907, to Cora Van Voorhis 'Mimi' Stanton (1883-1970; granddaughter of Edwin McMasters Stanton).
  Political family: Jahncke-Stanton family of New Orleans, Louisiana.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Elmer B. O'Hara — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1932; Wayne County Clerk, 1933-36; Michigan Democratic state chair, 1935-36; tried and convicted, along with State Sen. A. J. Wilkowski and others, on vote fraud charges in 1936; sentenced to four to five years in prison; also convicted on charges of bribing the Macomb County Drain Commissioner. Burial location unknown.
  Donn M. Roberts (1867-1936) — of Indiana. Born in Annapolis, Crawford County, Ill., September 28, 1867. Mayor of Terre Haute, Ind., 1913-15. Convicted of bribery in 1915 and spent three and a half years in prison; convicted of embezzlement in 1936 and sentenced to prison. Released from prison following a heart attack, and died a few days later, in Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind., August 3, 1936 (age 68 years, 310 days). Interment at St. Joseph's Cemetery, Terre Haute, Ind.
  Washington Irving Vanderpoel (born c.1880) — also known as W. Irving Vanderpoel — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Freeport, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in New York, about 1880. Democrat. Newspaper reporter; insurance broker; village president of Freeport, New York, 1925-26; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 1st District, 1926. Dutch ancestry. Indicted in December 1936, along with his brother Edwin and others, by a federal grand jury, over his involvement in a stock swindle; found not guilty, but his brother was convicted. Burial location unknown.
  Presumably named for: Washington Irving
  Relatives: Son of Edwin Colburn Vanderpoel (1851-1932).
  Henry Herman Denhardt (1876-1937) — also known as Henry H. Denhardt — of Bowling Green, Warren County, Ky. Born in Bowling Green, Warren County, Ky., March 8, 1876. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1923-27; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1924; shot and injured on Election Day 1931.; his girlfriend, Mrs. Verna Garr Taylor, was found shot to death in November 1936; he was charged with murder and tried in New Castle, Ky.; the jury could not reach a verdict. Before he could be tried a second time, he was shot and killed, at the Armstrong Hotel, Shelbyville, Shelby County, Ky., September 20, 1937 (age 61 years, 196 days). Interment at Fairview Cemetery, Bowling Green, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Margaret (Geiger) Denhardt (1838-1901) and William Denhardt (1845-1900).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel Dickstein (1885-1954) — also known as "Crook" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born near Vilna, Lithuania, February 5, 1885. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 4th District, 1919-22; U.S. Representative from New York, 1923-45 (12th District 1923-45, 19th District 1945); Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1945-53. Jewish. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; B'nai B'rith; Knights of Pythias; Elks; American Bar Association; Veterans of Foreign Wars. According to old Russian records found in the mid-1990s, he was a paid agent of the Soviet intelligence service while in Congress, and received some $12,000 in 1937-40 under the Soviet code-name "Crook". Died, in Beth Israel Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., April 22, 1954 (age 69 years, 76 days). Interment at Union Field Cemetery, Ridgewood, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Rabbi Israel Dickstein and Slata B. (Gordon) Dickstein.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  William C. Hunt — of Cape May County, N.J. Member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Cape May County, 1933-34; member of New Jersey state senate from Cape May County, 1937. Resigned in April 1937 after a court investigation of his election. Burial location unknown.
  Thomas Alfred Mathis (1869-1958) — also known as Thomas A. Mathis; "Cap'n Tom" — of Tuckerton, Ocean County, N.J.; Toms River, Ocean County, N.J. Born in New Gretna, Burlington County, N.J., June 7, 1869. Republican. Mariner; automobile dealer; member of New Jersey state senate from Ocean County, 1910-11, 1914-15, 1923-31, 1942-46; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1928, 1940, 1944; secretary of state of New Jersey, 1931-41. Indicted for tax evasion by a federal grand jury in 1937. He killed himself, by self-inflicted gunshot, in Toms River, Ocean County, N.J., May 18, 1958 (age 88 years, 345 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Toms River, N.J.
  Relatives: Father of William Steelman Mathis (1898-1981).
  The Thomas A. Mathis Bridge (opened 1950), which carries eastbound Route 37 across Barnegat Bay, from Toms River to Seaside Heights, New Jersey, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Anthony J. Argondizza (c.1899-1958) — of Maspeth, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in New York, about 1899. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; candidate for New York state senate 3rd District, 1924; arraigned in January 1937, and pleaded not guilty on a charge of making a false oath as a bankruptcy trustee; apparently the case never proceeded to trial; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1948. Italian ancestry. Member, American Legion; Knights of Columbus. Died in Maspeth, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., June 21, 1958 (age about 59 years). Burial location unknown.
  Joseph Santosuosso (1877-1968) — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.; Newton, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Taurasi, Italy, July 18, 1877. Democrat. Naturalized U.S. citizen; physician; lawyer; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1928; in 1933, he was attorney for General Equipment Corporation, in a lawsuit against the city of Boston for damages caused by subway constuction; he and others worked out a scheme in which Mayor James M. Curley would obtain $85,000 from the city to settle the claim, of which $50,000 was improperly retained by Santosuosso and Curley; in 1937, the city successfully sued both men for the return of the $50,000. Died in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., March, 1968 (age 90 years, 0 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Elizabeth (DiPesa) Santosuosso and Vincenzo Santosuosso (1854-1919); brother of Alfred Santosuosso (1889-1963); married, August 7, 1900, to Louise Moltedo.
  Edwin J. Szarzynski (born c.1907) — of St. Louis, Mo. Born in East St. Louis, St. Clair County, Ill., about 1907. Republican. Credit manager; charged in 1937 with embezzlement of $2,553 from his employer; pleaded guilty to a reduced charge, and sentenced to six months in the workhouse; served three and a half months; arrested in 1942 in a raid on a gambling operation; fined $15; dock worker; candidate for Missouri state senate 5th District, 1960. Burial location unknown.
Edward S. Moran, Jr. Edward S. Moran, Jr. (b. 1901) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., November 19, 1901. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Kings County 12th District, 1927-38. Arrested in June 1938 and charged with accepting $36,000 in bribes from two taxicab companies; released on bail; again arrested in April 1939 and charged with state income tax evasion; again released; tried on the bribery charges in June 1939 and convicted; sentenced to two and a half to five years in prison; released pending appeal, which was unsuccessful; disbarred; started prison term in January 1941; released on parole in September 1942. Burial location unknown.
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
  Samuel Davis Wilson (1881-1939) — also known as S. Davis Wilson — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., August 31, 1881. Mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1936-39; died in office 1939; candidate in Democratic primary for U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1938; twice indicted by a grand jury in 1938-39 on charges related to vice and gambling in Philadelphia; never tried. Died, from cerebral thrombosis and hypertension, in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., August 19, 1939 (age 57 years, 353 days). Cremated.
  Nathan Spiro (born c.1867) — of Danbury, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Poland, about 1867. Republican. Merchant; member of Connecticut state house of representatives from Danbury; defeated, 1930; elected 1932; member of Connecticut state senate, 1935. Pleaded guilty in June 1938 to accepting a bribe while State Senator, and fined $1,500. Burial location unknown.
  Joseph H. Lawlor (born c.1878) — of Waterbury, New Haven County, Conn. Born in Waterbury, New Haven County, Conn., about 1878. Democrat. Member of Connecticut state senate 16th District, 1925-31; member of Connecticut Democratic State Central Committee, 1928-30. Charged in 1938 with accepting a bribe in 1935. Burial location unknown.
  Harry E. Mackenzie — of Bethel, Fairfield County, Conn. Republican. Alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Connecticut, 1928, 1932, 1936. Charged in May, 1938, along with Mayor T. Frank Hayes and 25 others, with conspiracy to cheat and defraud the city of Waterbury of more than a million dollars; admitted that he received large fees for lobbying, and paid half back as a kickback to the other conspirators; pleaded guilty in November 1938, and testified against the other defendants; sentenced to nine months in jail. Burial location unknown.
  John H. Crary — of Waterbury, New Haven County, Conn. Democrat. Member of Connecticut Democratic State Central Committee, 1922-30; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Connecticut, 1928, 1932; Waterbury city assessor. Charged in May, 1938, along with Mayor T. Frank Hayes and 25 others, with conspiracy to cheat and defraud the city of Waterbury of more than a million dollars; tried in 1938-39 and convicted; sentenced to two months in jail and fined $500. Burial location unknown.
  Daniel J. Leary — of Waterbury, New Haven County, Conn. Democrat. Brewer; carbonated beverage business; Waterbury city controller, 1930-37; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Connecticut, 1932. Charged in May, 1938, along with Mayor T. Frank Hayes and 25 others, with conspiracy to cheat and defraud the city of Waterbury of more than a million dollars; tried in 1938-39 and convicted; sentenced to 10-to-15 years in prison; his plea for a reduced sentence was rejected by the State Board of Pardons in 1949. Burial location unknown.
  Charles E. Williamson (born c.1880) — of Darien, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Darien, Fairfield County, Conn., about 1880. Republican. Lawyer; member of Connecticut state house of representatives from Darien, 1909-12, 1915-16, 1921-22; member of Connecticut state senate 26th District, 1917-20; member of Connecticut Republican State Central Committee, 1922; delegate to Republican National Convention from Connecticut, 1924, 1932 (alternate). Charged in May, 1938, along with Mayor T. Frank Hayes and 25 others, with conspiracy to cheat and defraud the city of Waterbury of more than a million dollars; tried in 1938-39 and convicted; sentenced to one year in jail and fined $500. Burial location unknown.
  T. Frank Hayes (c.1884-1965) — of Waterbury, New Haven County, Conn. Born about 1884. Democrat. Member of Connecticut state house of representatives from Waterbury, 1927-30; mayor of Waterbury, Conn., 1930-39; resigned 1939; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Connecticut, 1932, 1936; Lieutenant Governor of Connecticut, 1935-39. Charged in May, 1938, along with 26 others, with conspiracy to cheat and defraud the city of Waterbury of more than a million dollars; tried in 1938-39 and convicted; sentenced to 10-to-15 years in prison; released in 1949. Suffered a heart attack at home, and died soon after, in St. Mary's Hospital, Waterbury, New Haven County, Conn., March 26, 1965 (age about 81 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas H. Hayes and Ellen E. Hayes (c.1861-1943).
  Cross-reference: Daniel J. Leary — Harry E. Mackenzie — John H. Crary — Charles E. Williamson
Frank L. Shaw Frank L. Shaw (1877-1958) — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born near Warwick, Ontario, February 1, 1877. Republican. Mayor of Los Angeles, Calif., 1933-38; recalled 1938; defeated, 1941; a recall campaign against him in 1938 charged that he was associated with unspecified "racketeers" and "underworld characters", and that his administration tolerated vice in the city; meanwhile, Harry J. Raymond, a private investigator nearly killed in a January 1938 bombing, charged, in a civil lawsuit for damages, that the mayor had been part of a plot by gambling and vice interests to murder him. Died, from cancer, in California Hospital, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., January 24, 1958 (age 80 years, 357 days). Interment at Inglewood Park Cemetery, Inglewood, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of John D. Shaw.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: Los Angeles Times, April 4, 1937
Julius S. Berg Julius S. Berg (1895-1938) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 15, 1895. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; injured in combat and lost a leg; member of New York state assembly from Bronx County 3rd District, 1923-30; member of New York state senate 22nd District, 1931-38; died in office 1938. Jewish. Member, American Legion; Jewish War Veterans; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Disabled American Veterans; Freemasons; Elks; Knights of Pythias. Indicted on charges of receiving money for his aid in procuring liquor licenses and arranging for concessions at the New York World's Fair; that same day, he killed himself by gunshot, in his law office, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 20, 1938 (age 43 years, 5 days). Interment at Mt. Ararat Cemetery, East Farmingdale, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Morris Berg and Celia (Weinstein) Berg; married, June 20, 1920, to Rose Schram.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
  Coleman W. Avery (1880-1938) — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, February 22, 1880. Democrat. Lawyer; justice of Ohio state supreme court, 1920; appointed 1920; defeated, 1920. According to published reports, he murdered his wife, Sara, by shooting her in the head, and then shot himself; he was found and taken to General Hospital, where he died without regaining consciousness, in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, March 14, 1938 (age 58 years, 20 days). Interment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of William Ledyard Avery (1833-1898) and Johanna (Ummethun) Avery (1843-1909); married 1904 to Elinor Coates Baer (1882-1929); married 1934 to Sara Loving (1893-1938).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Walter Hubert Annenberg (1908-2002) — also known as Walter H. Annenberg — of Wynnewood, Montgomery County, Pa. Born in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis., March 13, 1908. Vice-president of his father's company, which published the Racing Form and other newspapers; he and his father were indicted for tax evasion in 1939, but the charges against him were dismissed as part of a plea bargain; inherited the company when his father died; founder of Seventeen and TV Guide; owner of radio and television stations; philanthropist; U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, 1969-74. Jewish ancestry. Member, Newcomen Society; Phi Sigma Delta; Sigma Delta Chi; Zeta Beta Tau. Received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1986. Died, of pneumonia, in Wynnewood, Montgomery County, Pa., October 1, 2002 (age 94 years, 202 days). Interment at Sunnyland Estate, Rancho Mirage, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Moses Annenberg and Sarah Annenberg; married 1938 to Veronica Dunkelman (divorced 1950); married 1951 to Leonore Cohn Rosentiel (1918-2009).
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Sol Ullman (c.1893-1941) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., about 1893. Republican. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 6th District, 1919-23; defeated, 1923; indicted by a Federal grand jury in 1921 on charges of conspiring to create a falsified income tax return for a manufacturing company; a trial resulted in a directed verdict of acquittal due to insufficient evidence; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1928; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 14th District, 1928. Jewish. Member, American Bar Association; Freemasons. Arrested and indicted in 1939 on charges of protecting a physician who performed illegal abortions; in 1941, a dentist was convicted as Ullman's agent in soliciting protection money from physicians, and during the pendency of the criminal charges, disbarment proceedings were brought against him. However, he was never tried, and his obituary states that he was "exonerated". Died, in Lenox Hill Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 6, 1941 (age about 48 years). Entombed at Union Field Cemetery, Ridgewood, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Ullman and Kate Ullman; married to Esther or Estelle Blau.
  Martin Thomas Manton (1880-1946) — also known as Martin T. Manton — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Islip, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., August 2, 1880. Lawyer; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of New York, 1916-18; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit, 1918-39; resigned 1939. Catholic. Irish ancestry. U.S. District Attorney Thomas E. Dewey charged in 1939 that Judge Manton had received more than $400,000 from litigants; Dewey sent six specific instances the U.S. House Judiciary Committee for consideration of impeachment. Following the judge's resignation, he was indicted on bribery charges; tried and convicted; sentenced to two years in prison and fined $10,000; released in 1941. Died in Fayetteville, Onondaga County, N.Y., November 17, 1946 (age 66 years, 107 days). Interment at Immaculate Conception Cemetery, Fayetteville, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Michael Manton and Catherine (Mullen) Manton; married, July 3, 1907, to Eva M. Morier.
  Cross-reference: John L. Lotsch — Edwin Stark Thomas — Matthew T. Abruzzo
  See also federal judicial profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Earl Russel Browder (1891-1973) — also known as Earl Browder — of Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Wichita, Sedgwick County, Kan., May 20, 1891. Communist. As a result of his opposition to U.S. participation in World War I, he was convicted in 1917 of conspiracy against the draft laws and sentenced to sixteen months in prison; imprisoned again in 1919; pardoned in 1933; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1930 (6th District), 1932 (20th District), 1940 (14th District); General Secretary of the Communist Party of the U.S., 1934-44; candidate for President of the United States, 1936, 1940; arrested in 1939 for a passport violation, convicted, and sentenced to four years in prison (sentence commuted after fourteen months); expelled from the Communist Party, 1946. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., June 27, 1973 (age 82 years, 38 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Browder and Martha (Hankins) Browder; married 1926 to Raissa Berkman.
  Cross-reference: George E. Powers
  See also Wikipedia article
  Edwin Stark Thomas (1872-1952) — of New Haven, New Haven County, Conn. Born in Woodstock, McHenry County, Ill., November 11, 1872. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Connecticut state house of representatives from Orange, 1899-1900; defeated, 1900; secretary of Connecticut Democratic Party, 1902-12; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Connecticut, 1908 (alternate), 1912; executive secretary to Gov. Simeon Baldwin, 1911-13; U.S. District Judge for Connecticut, 1913-39; resigned 1939. During an investigation of his financial affairs and actions in certain cases by a federal grand jury, prompted by connections to the bribery case of another federal judge, Martin T. Manton, he resigned, citing illness. Died in Columbia, Tolland County, Conn., January 21, 1952 (age 79 years, 71 days). Interment at Grove Cemetery, Eastford, Conn.
  Relatives: Married 1931 to Jean Virginia Gordon (1890-1979).
  See also federal judicial profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Nathan Lieberman (c.1888-1939) — also known as Leonard Madden — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born about 1888. Republican. Lawyer; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1912; member of New York state assembly from New York County 17th District, 1921; in March 1939, he was charged, along with two others, over a stock fraud scheme; he pleaded not guilty and was released on bail; meanwhile, in a separate case, he was indicted in Broome County. Member, Freemasons; Elks. Died, apparently of pneumonia, while attempting to kill himself with poison, in his room at the Tudor Hotel (where he had registered under the assumed name "Leonard Madden"), Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., March 12, 1939 (age about 51 years). Burial location unknown.
Edgar J. Lauer Edgar J. Lauer (1871-1948) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 10, 1871. Republican. Lawyer; Judge, New York City Municipal Court, 1906-33; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1934-39; resigned 1939. In 1938, his wife pleaded guilty in Federal Court to charges that she smuggled expensive clothing and diamonds from Europe to the U.S.; she was fined and sentenced to three months in prison and fined. In 1939, the state legislature moved to investigate whether Judge Lauer had knowledge of his wife's smuggling activities; he denied this, but immediately resigned his seat. Died, in Mount Sinai Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 9, 1948 (age 76 years, 365 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Emanuel Lauer and Cecilia (Hornthal) Lauer; married to Elma M. Kramer.
  Image source: Empire State Notables (1914)
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
  The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
  Information on this page — and on all other pages of this site — is believed to be accurate, but is not guaranteed. Users are advised to check with other sources before relying on any information here.  
  The official URL for this page is: https://politicalgraveyard.com/trouble/1930-1939.html.  
  Links to this or any other Political Graveyard page are welcome, but specific page addresses may sometimes change as the site develops.  
  If you are searching for a specific named individual, try the alphabetical index of politicians.  
  More information: FAQ; privacy policy; cemetery links.  
  If you find any error or omission in The Political Graveyard, or if you have information to share, please see the biographical checklist and submission guidelines.  
Copyright notices: (1) Facts are not subject to copyright; see Feist v. Rural Telephone. (2) Politician portraits displayed on this site are 70-pixel-wide monochrome thumbnail images, which I believe to constitute fair use under applicable copyright law. Where possible, each image is linked to its online source. However, requests from owners of copyrighted images to delete them from this site are honored. (3) Original material, programming, selection and arrangement are © 1996-2019 Lawrence Kestenbaum. (4) This work is also licensed for free non-commercial re-use, with attribution, under a Creative Commons License.
Site information: The Political Graveyard is created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum, who is solely responsible for its structure and content. — The mailing address is The Political Graveyard, P.O. Box 2563, Ann Arbor MI 48106. — This site is hosted by HDL. — The Political Graveyard opened on July 1, 1996; the last full revision was done on March 10, 2021.

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