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The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble: 1800 to 1849

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in approximate chronological order

Oliver Wolcott, Jr. Oliver Wolcott, Jr. (1760-1833) — of Litchfield, Litchfield County, Conn.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Litchfield, Litchfield County, Conn., January 11, 1760. Connecticut state comptroller, 1788-90; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1795-1800; banker; Governor of Connecticut, 1817-27; delegate to Connecticut state constitutional convention, 1818. Congregationalist. Accused, by political adversaries in 1800, of setting fire to the State Department, and resigned from the Cabinet in protest against the investigation. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., June 1, 1833 (age 73 years, 141 days). Interment at East Cemetery, Litchfield, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Oliver Wolcott, Sr. and Laura (Collins) Wolcott; brother of Mary Ann Wolcott (1765-1805; who married Chauncey Goodrich) and Frederick Wolcott; nephew of Erastus Wolcott and Ursula Wolcott (1724-1788; who married Matthew Griswold (1714-1799)); grandson of Roger Wolcott (1679-1767); granduncle of Roger Wolcott (1847-1900); third great-grandson of William Leete; first cousin of Roger Griswold; first cousin twice removed of John William Allen, James Samuel Wadsworth, Henry Titus Backus, Christopher Parsons Wolcott and Matthew Griswold (1833-1919); first cousin thrice removed of Charles Frederick Wadsworth, James Wolcott Wadsworth, Edward Oliver Wolcott and Alfred Wolcott; first cousin four times removed of James Wolcott Wadsworth, Jr. and Selden Chapin; first cousin five times removed of James Jermiah Wadsworth and Frederic Lincoln Chapin; first cousin six times removed of James Wadsworth Symington; second cousin once removed of William Pitkin, Gaylord Griswold, Samuel Clesson Allen, William Wolcott Ellsworth and Henry Leavitt Ellsworth; second cousin twice removed of Elisha Hunt Allen and George Washington Wolcott; second cousin thrice removed of Edmund Holcomb, Albert Asahel Bliss, Philemon Bliss, William Fessenden Allen and Frederick Hobbes Allen; second cousin four times removed of Judson H. Warner, Nelson Platt Wheeler, William Egbert Wheeler and Henry Augustus Wolcott; second cousin five times removed of Alexander Royal Wheeler; third cousin of Daniel Pitkin; third cousin once removed of Enoch Woodbridge, Joseph Silliman (1756-1829) and Timothy Pitkin; third cousin twice removed of Leveret Brainard, Edwin Carpenter Pinney, Roger Calvin Leete and John Robert Graham Pitkin; third cousin thrice removed of Joseph Pomeroy Root, George Griswold Sill (1829-1907), Frederick Walker Pitkin, George Buckingham Beecher, Luther S. Pitkin and Claude Carpenter Pinney; fourth cousin of Benjamin Tallmadge, Elizur Goodrich, William Woodbridge and Joseph Silliman (1786?-1850); fourth cousin once removed of Frederick Augustus Tallmadge, Josiah C. Chittenden, Abel Madison Scranton, Frederick Enoch Woodbridge and Joseph Fitch Silliman.
  Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: One Hundredth Anniversary (1919)
  John Rowan (1773-1843) — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born near York, York County, Pa., July 12, 1773. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Kentucky state constitutional convention, 1799; secretary of state of Kentucky, 1804-08; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 3rd District, 1807-09; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1813-17, 1822-24; Judge, Kentucky Court of Appeals, 1819-21; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1825-31. Built the mansion "Federal Hill", later made famous by his cousin, the songwriter Stephen Foster, in the song "My Old Kentucky Home." Fought a duel about 1801 with an acquaintance, James Chambers, in which the latter was killed; arrested and tried on murder charges, but acquitted. Died in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., July 13, 1843 (age 70 years, 1 days). Interment at Bardstown Cemetery, Bardstown, Ky.
  Relatives: Married to Agnes Anne Lytle; father of John Rowan, Jr. (1807-1855); uncle of Robert Todd Lytle.
  Political family: Rowan-Lytle family of Kentucky.
  Cross-reference: Joseph Hamilton Daviess
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Joseph Hamilton Daviess (1774-1811) — also known as Joe Daviess — of Danville, Boyle County, Ky.; Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Bedford County, Va., March 4, 1774. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Kentucky, 1800-06; major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Welsh ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Around 1801, he served as a second to John Rowan in his duel with James Chambers; after Chambers was killed, he fled to avoid prosecution as accomplice to murder, and became a fugitive, but when Rowan was arrested, he returned to act as Rowan's legal counsel. Shot and killed in the Battle of Tippecanoe, in what is now Tippecanoe County, Ind., November 7, 1811 (age 37 years, 248 days). Interment at Tippecanoe Battlefield Park, Battle Ground, Ind.
  Relatives: Brother-in-law of John Marshall (1755-1835).
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Biddle-Randolph family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Anderson-Marshall family of Ohio and West Virginia; Pendleton-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Daviess counties in Ind., Ky. and Mo., and Jo Daviess County, Ill., are named for him.
  Robert Morris (1734-1806) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Liverpool, England, January 31, 1734. Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1776; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1785; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1789-95. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Financier of the American Revolution, but went broke in the process. Imprisoned for debt from February 1798 to August 1801. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 8, 1806 (age 72 years, 97 days). Entombed at Christ Church Burial Ground, Philadelphia, Pa.; statue at Independence National Historical Park, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Morris (1711-1750) and Elizabeth (Murphet) Morris (1712-1778); married, March 2, 1769, to Mary White (1749-1827); father of Thomas Morris and Henrietta 'Hetty' Morris (1774-1816; who married James Markham Marshall (1764-1848)); great-grandfather of John Augustine Marshall.
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Biddle-Randolph family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Morris Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $10 silver certificate in the 1870s and 1880s.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Robert Morris: Charles Rappleye, Robert Morris: Financier of the American Revolution
  Richard Valentine Morris (1768-1815) — also known as Richard V. Morris — of Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Morrisania, Westchester County (now part of Bronx, Bronx County), N.Y., March 8, 1768. U.S. Navy Captain, starting in 1798; criticized by his superiors for his inaction as commander during an attempted blockade of Tripoli in 1803; he faced a Naval Court of Inquiry in 1804 and was dismissed from the Navy; member of New York state assembly from Westchester County, 1813-14. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 13, 1815 (age 47 years, 66 days). Interment at St. Anne's Episcopal Churchyard, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Lewis Morris (1726-1798) and Mary (Walton) Morris (1727-1794); married, January 24, 1797, to Anne Walton (1773-1858); nephew of Richard Morris (1730-1810) and Gouverneur Morris (1752-1816); grandnephew of Robert Hunter Morris; great-grandson of Lewis Morris (1671-1746); great-granduncle of Gouverneur Morris Carnochan (1865-1915); second great-granduncle of Gouverneur Morris Carnochan (1892-1943); first cousin of Lewis Richard Morris; first cousin once removed of Gouverneur Morris (1809-1894).
  Political family: Morris-Ingersoll family of New York and Connecticut (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel Chase (1741-1811) — of Maryland. Born near Princess Anne, Somerset County, Md., April 17, 1741. Delegate to Continental Congress from Maryland, 1774-78, 1781-82, 1783-85; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; state court judge in Maryland, 1788; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1796-1811; died in office 1811. Episcopalian. Articles of impeachment were filed against him in 1804 on charges of malfeasance in office; tried by the Senate in 1805 and acquitted of all charges. Died in Washington, D.C., June 19, 1811 (age 70 years, 63 days). Interment at Old St. Paul's Cemetery, Baltimore, Md.
  Cross-reference: Luther Martin
  See also congressional biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William W. Irvin (1779-1842) — of Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio. Born near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va., April 5, 1779. Democrat. Lawyer; common pleas court judge in Ohio, 1803-04; impeached and removed from office as judge by the state legislature, 1804; member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1806-07, 1825-27; Speaker of the Ohio State House of Representatives, 1825-26; justice of Ohio state supreme court, 1810-15; candidate for Governor of Ohio, 1822; U.S. Representative from Ohio 9th District, 1829-33. Died March 27, 1842 (age 62 years, 356 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Lancaster, Ohio.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Benjamin Sebastian — of Kentucky. Judge, Kentucky Court of Appeals, 1792-1806. Accused of being a paid agent of Spain; the charge was investigated by the Kentucky legislature, and he resigned in disgrace. Burial location unknown.
  Samuel Swartwout (1783-1856) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, N.Y., November 17, 1783. He was participant in Aaron Burr's "Western Conspiracy"; delivered a message from Burr to Gen. James Wilkinson in New Orleans; subsequently arrested in November 1806 for misprision of treason, but released a few months later; early promoter of railroads; openly supported the Texas Republic in its war for independence from Mexico; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1829-38; in 1838, it was alleged that he had embezzled more than $1.2 million from the New York customs house, and fled to England; later investigation implicated a subordinate of his as having obtained most of that money; forfeited his property and returned to the U.S. in 1841. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 21, 1856 (age 73 years, 4 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Abraham Swartwout and Maria (North) Swartwout; married 1814 to Alice Ann Cooper.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jonathan Dayton (1760-1824) — of Elizabethtown, Essex County (now Elizabeth, Union County), N.J. Born in Elizabethtown, Essex County (now Elizabeth, Union County), N.J., October 16, 1760. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Essex County, 1786-87, 1790, 1814-15; Delegate to Continental Congress from New Jersey, 1787-89; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Representative from New Jersey at-large, 1791-99; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1795-99; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1799-1805. Episcopalian. Member, Society of the Cincinnati; Freemasons. Arrested in 1807 on charges of conspiring with Aaron Burr in treasonable projects; gave bail and was released, but never brought to trial. Died in Elizabethtown, Essex County (now Elizabeth, Union County), N.J., October 9, 1824 (age 63 years, 359 days). Entombed at St. John's Churchyard, Elizabeth, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Elias Dayton (1737-1807); distant relative *** of William Lewis Dayton.
  Political family: Dayton family of Elizabeth, New Jersey.
  The city of Dayton, Ohio, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas McKean (1734-1817) — of New Castle, New Castle County, Del.; Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in New London Township, Chester County, Pa., March 19, 1734. Lawyer; member of Delaware colonial Assembly, 1765-76; common pleas court judge in Delaware, 1765-74; Delegate to Continental Congress from Delaware, 1774-76; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Delaware house of assembly, 1777-83; President of Delaware, 1777; chief justice of Pennsylvania state supreme court, 1777-99; signer, Articles of Confederation, 1781; delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1789-90; Governor of Pennsylvania, 1799-1808; impeached by the Pennsylvania legislature in 1807, but no trial was ever held. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., June 24, 1817 (age 83 years, 97 days). Original interment at First Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.; reinterment in 1843 at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of William McKean and Letitia (Finley) McKean; married to the sister-in-law of Francis Hopkinson (1737-1791); married 1763 to Mary Borden (died 1773); married 1774 to Sarah Armitage.
  Political family: Hopkinson-McKean family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  McKean County, Pa. is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Thomas McKean Thompson McKennanThomas McKean Pettit
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Aaron Burr (1756-1836) — also known as Aaron Edwards — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Newark, Essex County, N.J., February 6, 1756. Democrat. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; member of New York state assembly, 1784-85, 1797-99, 1800-01 (New York County 1784-85, 1797-99, Orange County 1800-01); New York state attorney general, 1789-91; appointed 1789; U.S. Senator from New York, 1791-97; Vice President of the United States, 1801-05. Presbyterian. Killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel, July 11, 1804. Tried for treason in 1807 and acquitted. Died, after several strokes, at the Winants or Port Richmond Hotel, Port Richmond, Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., September 14, 1836 (age 80 years, 221 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery, Princeton, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Aaron Burr (1716-1757) and Esther (Edwards) Burr (1732-1758); brother of Sarah Burr (1754-1797; who married Tapping Reeve); married, July 2, 1782, to Theodosia (Bartow) Prevost (1746-1794; first cousin twice removed of Francis Stebbins Bartow); married 1833 to Eliza (Bowen) Jumel (1775-1865); father of Theodosia Burr (1783-1813; who married Joseph Alston); nephew of Pierpont Edwards; third great-grandson of Thomas Willett; ancestor of Karla Ballard; first cousin of Theodore Dwight and Henry Waggaman Edwards; first cousin four times removed of Anson Foster Keeler (1887-1943); second cousin of John Davenport and James Davenport; second cousin once removed of Theodore Davenport; second cousin twice removed of Charles Robert Sherman; second cousin thrice removed of Charles Taylor Sherman, William Tecumseh Sherman, Lampson Parker Sherman, John Sherman and Evert Harris Kittell; second cousin four times removed of Chauncey Mitchell Depew, Ezekiel Gilbert Stoddard, Stillman Stephen Light and Blanche M. Woodward; second cousin five times removed of Alfred Walstein Bangs, John Clarence Keeler, Louis Ezekiel Stoddard, John Cecil Purcell and Arthur Callen Kittell, Jr.; third cousin of Benjamin Tallmadge; third cousin once removed of Frederick Augustus Tallmadge; third cousin twice removed of Eli Thacher Hoyt, George Smith Catlin, John Appleton, Howkin Bulkley Beardslee, Joseph Pomeroy Root and Edward Williams Hooker; third cousin thrice removed of Greene Carrier Bronson, Abijah Catlin, David Munson Osborne, George Landon Ingraham, Dwight Arthur Silliman and Charles Dunsmore Millard; fourth cousin of Noah Phelps and Hezekiah Case; fourth cousin once removed of Parmenio Adams, Elisha Phelps, Ambrose Tuttle, Jesse Hoyt, Abiel Case, Henry Fisk Janes, Jairus Case, George Washington Wolcott, William Dean Kellogg and Almon Case.
  Political families: Keeler-Floyd-Sherman-Bangs family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Jonathan Dayton — Nathaniel Pendleton — John Smith — John Tayler — Walter D. Corrigan, Sr. — Cowles Mead — Luther Martin — William P. Van Ness — Samuel Swartwout — William Wirt — Theophilus W. Smith
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Aaron Burr: Milton Lomask, Aaron Burr: The Years from Princeton to Vice President, 1756-1805 — Milton Lomask, Aaron Burr: The Conspiracy and Years of Exile, 1805-1836 — Joseph Wheelan, Jefferson's Vendetta : The Pursuit of Aaron Burr and the Judiciary — Buckner F. Melton Jr., Aaron Burr : Conspiracy to Treason — Thomas Fleming, Duel: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Future of America — Arnold A. Rogow, A Fatal Friendship: Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr — H. W. Brands, The Heartbreak of Aaron Burr — David O. Stewart, American Emperor: Aaron Burr's Challenge to Jefferson's America — Donald Barr Chidsey, The great conspiracy: Aaron Burr and his strange doings in the West
  Fiction about Aaron Burr: Gore Vidal, Burr
  John Smith (c.1735-1824) — of Columbia (now part of Cincinnati), Hamilton County, Ohio. Born about 1735. Democrat. Member of Northwest Territory legislature, 1799-1803; delegate to Ohio state constitutional convention from Hamilton County, 1802; U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1803-08; resigned 1808. Indicted in Richmond, Virginia, 1807 on charges of participating in treasonous schemes with Aaron Burr; the charges were dropped after Burr was acquitted. Later that year, a Senate committee chaired by John Quincy Adams recommended that Smith be expelled from the Senate for his association with Burr. A trial was held in April 1808; Smith was represented by Francis Scott Key and Robert Goodloe Harper. The expulsion resolution failed on a vote of 19 to 10, one vote short of the two-thirds required. Died in St. Francisville, West Feliciana Parish, La., July 30, 1824 (age about 89 years). Burial location unknown.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  James Swan (1754-1830) — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.; Paris, France. Born in Scotland, 1754. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; twice wounded at the Battle of Bunker Hill; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1777-78; imprisoned for debt in Paris, from 1808 to about 1830. Died in Paris, France, July 31, 1830 (age about 76 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1776 to Hepzibah Clarke.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James Swan (built 1944, wrecked 1952) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Timothy Pickering (1745-1829) — of Salem, Essex County, Mass.; Luzerne County, Pa.; Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Salem, Essex County, Mass., July 17, 1745. Farmer; Essex County Register of Deeds, 1774-77; common pleas court judge in Massachusetts, 1775, 1802-03; member of Massachusetts state legislature, 1776; colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1789; U.S. Postmaster General, 1791-95; U.S. Secretary of War, 1795; U.S. Secretary of State, 1795-1800; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1803-11; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1813-17 (at-large 1813-15, 2nd District 1815-17); member of Massachusetts Governor's Council, 1817-18. Puritan; later Unitarian. Member, Society of the Cincinnati. Censured by the Senate in 1811 for violating an injunction of secrecy. Died in Salem, Essex County, Mass., January 29, 1829 (age 83 years, 196 days). Interment at Broad Street Cemetery, Salem, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Timothy Pickering (1703-1778) and Mary (Wingate) Pickering (1708-1784); married, April 8, 1776, to Rebecca White (1754-1828); granduncle of Dudley Leavitt Pickman; second great-granduncle of John Gardner Coolidge and Augustus Peabody Gardner; third great-granduncle of John Lee Saltonstall; fourth great-granduncle of Leverett Saltonstall, Richard Saltonstall, William Gurdon Saltonstall, John Lee Saltonstall, Jr. and William Amory Gardner Minot; fifth great-granduncle of William Lawrence Saltonstall and John Forbes Kerry; ancestor *** of Susan Walker FitzGerald; first cousin once removed of John Wingate Weeks (1781-1853); first cousin thrice removed of John Wingate Weeks (1860-1926); first cousin four times removed of Charles Sinclair Weeks; second cousin twice removed of John Albion Andrew (1818-1867); second cousin thrice removed of Isaac Libbey, John Forrester Andrew and Henry Hersey Andrew; second cousin four times removed of Llewellyn Libby and William F. Nason; second cousin five times removed of Augustine B. Libby, Albanah Harvey Libby and Frederick Edwin Hanscom; third cousin once removed of Luther Walter Badger; third cousin twice removed of Amos Tuck; third cousin thrice removed of Hiram Augustus Huse (1840-1907) and Hiram Augustus Huse (1843-1902).
  Political families: Rodney family of Delaware; Holden-Davis-Lawrence-Garcelon family of Massachusetts; Weeks-Bigelow-Andrew-Prescott family; Saltonstall-Weeks family of Massachusetts; Lawrence-Andrew-Rodney-Parrish family of Adel, Georgia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Timothy Pickering: David McLean, Timothy Pickering and the Age of the American Revolution — Gerald H. Clarfield, Timothy Pickering and the American Republic
  William Hull (1753-1825) — Born in Derby, New Haven County, Conn., June 24, 1753. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1798-1805; Governor of Michigan Territory, 1805-12; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Following his surrender of Detroit to the British in 1812, was found guilty by a court-martial of cowardice, neglect of duty, and unofficerlike conduct, and sentenced to death; President Madison accepted this decision but remitted the sentence. Died in Newton, Middlesex County, Mass., November 29, 1825 (age 72 years, 158 days). Interment at Newton Cemetery, Newton, Mass.
  John Armstrong, Jr. (1758-1843) — also known as "Old Soldier"; "Monsieur Tombo" — of Pennsylvania; Dutchess County, N.Y. Born in Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pa., November 25, 1758. Republican. Major in Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; secretary of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1783-87; Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1787-88; U.S. Senator from New York, 1800-02, 1803-04; U.S. Minister to France, 1804-10; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Secretary of War, 1813-14; blamed for the British capture of Washington, D.C. in August 1814, and forced to resign; member of New York state assembly from Dutchess County, 1825. Catholic. Died in Red Hook, Dutchess County, N.Y., April 1, 1843 (age 84 years, 127 days). Entombed at Rhinebeck Cemetery, Rhinebeck, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John Armstrong and Rebecca (Lyon) Armstrong (1719-1797); brother of James Armstrong; married, January 18, 1789, to Alida Livingston (1761-1822; daughter of Robert R. Livingston (1718-1775); sister-in-law of Morgan Lewis; sister of Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813) and Edward Livingston; granddaughter of Robert Livingston); grandfather of John Jacob Astor III; great-grandfather of William Waldorf Astor; second great-grandfather of William Astor Chanler and Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler (1869-1942).
  Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lorenzo de Zavala (1788-1836) — also known as Manuel Lorenzo Justiniano de Zavala y Sáenz — of Mérida, Yucatan; La Porte, Harris County, Tex. Born in Tecoh, Yucatan, October 3, 1788. Active in politics in Mexico, 1812-34; imprisoned in 1814-17 by Mexican authorities over his advocacy of democratic reforms; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Harrisburg, 1835; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Harrisburg, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; Vice President of the Texas Republic, 1836. Died, of pneumonia, November 15, 1836 (age 48 years, 43 days). Interment at de Zavala Family Cemetery, La Porte, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Anastasio de Zavala y Velázquez and Maria Bárbara Sáenz y Castro; married 1807 to Teresa Correa y Correa (died 1831); married, November 12, 1831, to Emily West.
  Zavala County, Tex. is named for him.
  David Brydie Mitchell (1760-1837) — of Savannah, Chatham County, Ga.; Milledgeville, Baldwin County, Ga. Born in Muthill, Perthshire, Scotland, October 22, 1760. Georgia state attorney general, 1795; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1796; mayor of Savannah, Ga., 1801-02; U.S. Attorney for Georgia, 1802-04; Governor of Georgia, 1809-13, 1815-17; U.S. Indian Aagent to the Creek Nation, 1817-21; resigned from this position following charges that he was smuggling African slaves into the country. Scottish ancestry. Died in Milledgeville, Baldwin County, Ga., April 22, 1837 (age 76 years, 182 days). Interment at Memory Hill Cemetery, Milledgeville, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of John Mitchell.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Albert Lange (1801-1869) — of Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind. Born in Charlottenburg, Prussia (now part of Berlin, Germany), December 16, 1801. Republican. He belonged to a secret society which advocated a constitutional government for the German Empire; in 1824, the conspiracy was uncovered; he was convicted of treason and sentenced to fifteen years in in prison; pardoned in 1829, and left Germany for the United States; U.S. Consul in Amsterdam, 1849-50; Indiana state auditor, 1861-63; mayor of Terre Haute, Ind., 1863-67. Died in Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind., July 25, 1869 (age 67 years, 221 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Terre Haute, Ind.
  Lange Elementary School (now closed), in Terre Haute, Indiana, was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Richard Cutts (1771-1845) — of Pepperell, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Saco, York County, Maine, June 28, 1771. Democrat. Member of Massachusetts state legislature, 1790; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1801-13 (at-large 1801-05, 14th District 1805-13); imprisoned for debt, 1828. Died in Washington, D.C., April 7, 1845 (age 73 years, 283 days). Original interment at St. John's Church Cemetery, Lafayette Square, Washington, D.C.; reinterment in 1857 at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Married, March 31, 1804, to Anna Payne (1779-1832; sister-in-law of James Madison and John George Jackson (1777-1825)).
  Political families: Jackson-Lee family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Pendleton-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Stuart Foote (1804-1880) — also known as "Hangman Foote" — Born in Fauquier County, Va., February 28, 1804. U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1847-52; Governor of Mississippi, 1852-54; Representative from Tennessee in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Fought four duels; fled Alabama in 1830 to escape prosecution for dueling. Exchanged blows with Thomas Hart Benton on the floor of the U.S. Senate. Expelled from the Confederate Congress in early 1865 for going North on an unauthorized peace mission. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., May 20, 1880 (age 76 years, 82 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Helm Foote (1772-1817) and Helen Gibbon (Stuart) Foote (1776-1815); married, March 22, 1827, to Elizabeth Winters (1810-1855); married, June 15, 1859, to Rachel Douglas Boyd (1831-1882).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Henry Eaton (1790-1856) — also known as John H. Eaton — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born near Scotland Neck, Halifax County, N.C., June 18, 1790. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1815-16; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1818-21, 1821-29; U.S. Secretary of War, 1829-31; Governor of Florida Territory, 1834-36; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1836-40. Member, Freemasons. Resigned from Cabinet in 1831 during the scandal (called the "Petticoat Affair") over past infedelities of his second wife, Peggy Eaton. Died in Washington, D.C., November 17, 1856 (age 66 years, 152 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Eaton County, Mich. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Robert Potter (c.1800-1842) — of Oxford, Granville County, N.C. Born near Williamsboro, Vance County, N.C., about 1800. Member of North Carolina house of commons from Granville County, 1828, 1834; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 6th District, 1829-31; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Nacogdoches, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of the Navy, 1836; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Red River and Fannin, 1840-42; died in office 1842. Resigned from the U.S. Congress in 1831 after maiming two men in a jealous rage; convicted, and sentenced to six months in prison. Expelled in 1834 from the North Carolina House for cheating at cards. Shot and killed by members of an opposing faction who surrounded his home, in Harrison County (part now in Marion County), Tex., March 2, 1842 (age about 42 years). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Marion County, Tex.; reinterment in 1928 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Potter County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Stephen Fuller Austin (1793-1836) — also known as Stephen F. Austin; "Father of Texas" — Born in Wythe County, Va., November 3, 1793. Member of Missouri territorial legislature, 1814-19; delegate to Texas Convention of 1832 from District of San Felipe de Austin, 1832; took petition to Mexico City for the establishment of Texas as a separate Mexican state, 1832; charged with attempting revolution, and imprisoned until 1835; delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Austin, 1833; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of San Felipe de Austin, 1835; candidate for President of the Texas Republic, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1836; died in office 1836. Member, Freemasons. Died of pneumonia, in Brazoria County, Tex., December 27, 1836 (age 43 years, 54 days). Original interment at Peach Point Cemetery, Gulf Prairie, Tex.; reinterment in 1910 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Moses Austin (1761-1821) and Maria (Brown) Austin (1768-1824).
  Austin County, Tex. is named for him.
  The city of Austin, Texas, is named for him.  — Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, Texas, is named for him.  — Austin College, Sherman, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Handbook of Texas Online
  Books about Stephen F. Austin: Gregg Cantrell, Stephen F. Austin : Empresario of Texas
  William Stanbery (1788-1873) — of Newark, Licking County, Ohio. Born in Essex County, N.J., August 10, 1788. Lawyer; member of Ohio state senate, 1824-25; U.S. Representative from Ohio 8th District, 1827-33; censured by the Congress for use of unparliamentary language, July 11, 1832. Died in Newark, Licking County, Ohio, January 23, 1873 (age 84 years, 166 days). Interment at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Newark, Ohio.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  James Blair (1786-1834) — of South Carolina. Born in The Waxhaws, Lancaster County, S.C., September 26, 1786. Democrat. Planter; sheriff; U.S. Representative from South Carolina, 1821-22, 1829-34 (9th District 1821-22, 8th District 1829-34); resigned 1822; died in office 1834; in 1832, he assaulted newspaper editor Duff Green, breaking some bones, and fined $350. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Washington, D.C., April 1, 1834 (age 47 years, 187 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Theophilus Washington Smith (1784-1845) — also known as Theophilus W. Smith — of Edwardsville, Madison County, Ill. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., September 28, 1784. Studied law in the office of Aaron Burr; lawyer; newspaper editor; candidate for Illinois state attorney general, 1820; member of Illinois state senate, 1823-26; advocated the legalization of slavery in Illinois; justice of Illinois state supreme court, 1825-42; impeached by the Illinois Legislature in 1833, on charges of oppressive conduct and corruption; the Senate acquitted him on a vote of 12-10 (two-thirds required). Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., May 6, 1845 (age 60 years, 220 days). Original interment in unknown location; reinterment at Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Rodney Smith (1750-1791) and Mary (Thurston) Smith (1754-1820); father of Adeline Clarissa Smith (1812-1866; who married Jesse Burgess Thomas (1777-1853)) and Louise M. Smith (who married Levi Day Boone); uncle of Frances Everallyn Rose (1809-1836; who married William Wallace Irwin).
  Political family: Thomas-Smith-Irwin family of Pennsylvania (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Andrew Jackson Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) — also known as "Old Hickory"; "The Farmer of Tennessee"; "King Andrew the First" — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born, in a log cabin, in The Waxhaws, Lancaster County, S.C., March 15, 1767. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Tennessee, 1790-97; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1796-97; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1797-98, 1823-25; justice of Tennessee state supreme court, 1798; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Governor of Florida Territory, 1821; President of the United States, 1829-37; censured by the U.S. Senate in 1834 over his removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States; on January 30, 1835, while attending funeral services at the Capitol Building for Rep. Warren R. Davis of South Carolina, he was shot at with two guns -- which both misfired -- by Richard Lawrence, a house painter (later found not guilty by reason of insanity). Presbyterian. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Killed Charles Dickinson in a pistol duel, May 30, 1806; also dueled with Thomas Hart Benton and Waightstill Avery. Elected in 1910 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Died, of dropsy (congestive heart failure), in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., June 8, 1845 (age 78 years, 85 days). Interment at The Hermitage, Nashville, Tenn.; statue erected 1853 at Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1856 at Jackson Square, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Jackson (1730-1767) and Elizabeth (Hutchinson) Jackson (1737-1781); married, January 17, 1794, to Rachel (Donelson) Robards (1767-1828; aunt of Andrew Jackson Donelson (1799-1871)).
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Caffery family of Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Francis P. Blair
  Jackson counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Mich., Miss., Mo., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Tenn., Tex., W.Va. and Wis., and Hickory County, Mo., are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Andrew J. DonelsonAndrew Jackson MillerAndrew J. FaulkAndrew Jackson TitusAndrew Jackson IsacksAndrew Jackson HamiltonAndrew J. HarlanAndrew J. KuykendallAndrew J. ThayerElam A. J. GreeleyAndrew Jackson IngleAndrew J. OgleAndrew Jackson CarrAndrew J. WatermanAndrew J. BentleyAndrew J. RogersWilliam A. J. SparksAndrew Jackson PoppletonAndrew J. HunterAndrew Jackson BryantAndrew J. BealeA. J. ClementsAndrew Jackson BakerAndrew J. FeltA. J. KingAndrew J. SawyerAndrew Jackson GreenfieldAndrew Jackson CaldwellAndrew Jackson GahaganAndrew Jackson BishipAndrew Jackson HoustonAndrew J. CobbAndrew J. MontagueAndrew J. BarchfeldAndrew J. BallietAndrew J. KirkAndrew J. LivingstonA. J. SherwoodAndrew Jackson StewartAndrew J. MayAndrew J. McConnicoAndrew J. SawyerAndrew J. BrewerAndrew BettwyAndrew J. TransueAndrew Jackson GravesAndrew Jackson GilbertAndrew J. GoodwinAndrew J. HinshawAndy YoungAndrew Jackson Kupper
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $20 bill; from the 1860s until 1927, his portrait appeared on on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $5 to $10,000. In 1861, his portrait appeared on Confederate States $1,000 notes.
  Campaign slogan: "Let the people rule."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Tennessee Encyclopedia
  Books about Andrew Jackson: Robert Vincent Remini, The Life of Andrew Jackson — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Freedom, 1822-1832 — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Democracy, 1833-1845 — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Empire, 1767-1821 — Andrew Burstein, The Passions of Andrew Jackson — David S. Heidler & Jeanne T. Heidler, Old Hickory's War: Andrew Jackson and the Quest for Empire — Donald B. Cole, The Presidency of Andrew Jackson — H. W. Brands, Andrew Jackson : His Life and Times — Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House — Donald Barr Chidsey, Andrew Jackson, Hero
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Henry P. Scholte (1805-1868) — of Pella, Marion County, Iowa. Born in Amsterdam, Netherlands, September 25, 1805. Republican. Preacher; joined the dissenters from the national church of the Netherlands; tried in 1834 for teaching heresy, expelled from the church, fined, and imprisoned; helped organize a group which emigrated to Iowa in 1847; lawyer; postmaster; delegate to Republican National Convention from Iowa, 1860. Dutch ancestry. Died August 25, 1868 (age 62 years, 335 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Pella, Iowa.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Smith (1788-1851) — of Texas. Born in Kentucky, May 20, 1788. Delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Columbia, 1835; Provisional Governor of Texas, 1835-36; impeached as governor by the provisional council in 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of the Treasury, 1836-38; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1840; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush. Died in Los Angeles County, Calif., March 4, 1851 (age 62 years, 288 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of James Smith and Magdalen (Woods) Smith.
  Robert Wilson (1793-1856) — also known as "Honest Bob" — of Texas. Born in Easton, Talbot County, Md., December 7, 1793. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; delegate to Texas Convention of 1832 from District of San Jacinto, 1832; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Harrisburg and Liberty, 1836-38, 1839; candidate for President of the Texas Republic, 1838, 1843; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1845. Member, Freemasons. Expelled from Texas Republic Senate, December 26, 1838, for using profanity and disclosing secrecy; subsequently returned to office. Died May 25, 1856 (age 62 years, 170 days). Original interment in private or family graveyard; reinterment at Glenwood Cemetery, Houston, Tex.
  Israel DeWolf Andrews (c.1813-1871) — also known as Israel D. Andrews — of Maine. Born in New Brunswick, about 1813. Naturalized U.S. citizen; imprisoned for debt more than once; U.S. Consul in SAINT John, 1843-48; U.S. Special Diplomatic Agent to Canada, 1849-54; U.S. Consul General in Toronto, 1855-57; successfully advocated for reciprocal trade agreements. Died, reportedly due to alcoholism, in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., February 17, 1871 (age about 58 years). Interment at Hillside Cemetery, Eastport, Maine.
  Relatives: Son of Israel Andrews and Elizabeth (Scott) Andrews.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Franklin Mitchell (1806-1865) — of Lockport, Niagara County, N.Y. Born in Bucks County, Pa., February 18, 1806. U.S. Representative from New York 33rd District, 1837-41. Convicted of forgery in 1841 and sentenced to Sing Sing prison in New York; pardoned due to ill health; moved to Ohio. Died in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, September 27, 1865 (age 59 years, 221 days). Interment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Jesse Hoyt (1792-1867) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New Canaan, Fairfield County, Conn., June 28, 1792. Lawyer; law partner of Martin Van Buren and Benjamin F. Butler; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1823; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1838-41; removed from office in 1841, over allegations of embezzlement. Died March 17, 1867 (age 74 years, 262 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Goold Hoyt (1766-1826) and Sarah (Reed) Hoyt (1768-1821); sixth great-grandnephew of Thomas Welles; third cousin once removed of Daniel Chapin; third cousin twice removed of Pierpont Edwards, Harold Sheffield Van Buren, Mabel Thorp Boardman, Sheffield Phelps (1864-1902) and Asbury Elliott Kellogg; third cousin thrice removed of Josiah Cowles, Simeon Baldwin and Phelps Phelps; fourth cousin of Graham Hurd Chapin and Martin E. Weed; fourth cousin once removed of John Davenport, Aaron Burr, James Davenport, Theodore Dwight, Henry Waggaman Edwards, Hanford Nichols Lockwood, George Smith Catlin and Barzillai Bulkeley Kellogg.
  Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Sherman family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Samuel W. Davies (c.1776-1843) — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in England, about 1776. Mayor of Cincinnati, Ohio, 1833-43. Tried by the city council in 1842 for mishandling a bank riot, and found guilty, but excused due to poor health. Died December 22, 1843 (age about 67 years). Burial location unknown.
  John M. Hansford (c.1800-1844) — of Texas. Born about 1800. Member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1838-40; judge of Texas Republic, 1840-42. Resigned as judge in 1842 while being impeached over his handling of a trial arising out of the "Regulator-Moderator War" in East Texas. Killed by members of the Regulators who had seized his home, in Texas, 1844 (age about 44 years). Burial location unknown.
  Hansford County, Tex. is named for him.
Cassius M. Clay Cassius Marcellus Clay (1810-1903) — also known as Cassius M. Clay; "The Lion of White Hall" — of Madison County, Ky. Born in Madison County, Ky., October 19, 1810. Probably the best-known Southern emancipationist; freed his own slaves in 1844 and edited the only Southern antislavery newspaper in 1845-47; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1835-37, 1840; delegate to Whig National Convention from Kentucky, 1839 (speaker); shot point-blank during a speech in 1843, he used a Bowie knife to cut off the attacker's ear and nose and cut out one eye; tried for mayhem and found not guilty; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1860; U.S. Minister to Russia, 1861-62, 1863-69; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Died, of kidney failure, in Madison County, Ky., July 22, 1903 (age 92 years, 276 days). Interment at Richmond Cemetery, Richmond, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Green Clay and Sally (Lewis) Clay (1776-1867); brother of Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878); married to Mary Jane Warfield; father of Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932) and Laura Clay; nephew of Matthew Clay (1754-1815); uncle of William Cassius Goodloe (1841-1889); first cousin of Matthew Clay (1795?-1827); second cousin of Henry Clay (1777-1852) and Porter Clay; second cousin once removed of Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay, Jr. and James Brown Clay; second cousin twice removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884); second cousin thrice removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Clement Comer Clay; third cousin once removed of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Wilson-Dunn-Goodloe family of Indiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Other politicians named for him: Cassius M. C. TwitchellCassius C. PillsburyCassius C. Dowell
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
John Tyler John Tyler (1790-1862) — also known as "The Accidental President" — of Williamsburg, Va. Born in Charles City County, Va., March 29, 1790. Whig. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1811-16, 1823-25, 1839-40; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Representative from Virginia 23rd District, 1817-21; Governor of Virginia, 1825-27; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1827-36; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1829-30; delegate to Whig National Convention from Virginia, 1839 (Convention Vice-President); Vice President of the United States, 1841; defeated, 1836; President of the United States, 1841-45; delegate to Virginia secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Virginia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; died in office 1862. Episcopalian. English ancestry. A bill to impeach him was defeated in the House of Representatives in January 1843. Died, probably from a stroke, in a hotel room at Richmond, Va., January 18, 1862 (age 71 years, 295 days). Interment at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of John Tyler and Mary (Armistead) Tyler (1761-1797); married, March 20, 1813, to Letitia Christian; married, June 26, 1844, to Julia Gardiner (1820-1889; daughter of David Gardiner (1784-1844)); father of David Gardiner Tyler; third cousin of George Madison; third cousin once removed of Zachary Taylor; third cousin twice removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton and Aylett Hawes Buckner; third cousin thrice removed of James Francis Buckner and Bronson Murray Cutting.
  Political families: Saltonstall-Davis-Frelinghuysen-Appleton family of Massachusetts; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut; Mapes-Jennings-Denby-Neuman family of New York and Arizona; Tyler-Mapes family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Benjamin Tappan
  Tyler County, Tex. is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John T. RichJohn T. CuttingJohn Tyler CooperJohn Tyler Hammons
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about John Tyler: Oliver P. Chitwood, John Tyler : Champion of the Old South — Norma Lois Peterson, Presidencies of William Henry Harrison and John Tyler — Jane C. Walker, John Tyler : A President of Many Firsts — Edward P. Crapol, John Tyler, the Accidental President — Gary May, John Tyler: The 10th President, 1841-1845 — Donald Barr Chidsey, And Tyler Too
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Louis P. Cooke (1811-1849) — of Texas. Born in Tennessee, 1811. Colonel in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1838-39, 1841-42; Texas Republic Secretary of the Navy, 1839-41. Charged in 1843 with the murder of Captain Mark Lewis; at trial, the jury deadlocked, and he escaped before a second trial could be held. Wounded in an Indian raid on Corpus Christi in 1844 and lost an eye. Died, of cholera, in Brownsville, Cameron County, Tex., 1849 (age about 38 years). Interment somewhere in New Orleans, La.
  Benjamin Tappan (1773-1857) — of Steubenville, Jefferson County, Ohio. Born in Northampton, Hampshire County, Mass., May 25, 1773. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Ohio state senate from Trumbull County, 1803-04; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; common pleas court judge in Ohio, 1816-23; candidate for Governor of Ohio, 1826; Presidential Elector for Ohio, 1832; U.S. District Judge for Ohio, 1833; U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1839-45. Censured by the Senate on May 10, 1844, over his disclosure to the New York Evening Post of a secret message from President John Tyler outlining terms for the annexation of Texas. Died in Steubenville, Jefferson County, Ohio, April 20, 1857 (age 83 years, 330 days). Interment at Union Cemetery, Steubenville, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Tappan (1747-1831) and Sarah (Homes) Tappan (1748-1826); married, March 20, 1801, to Nancy Wright (1778-1822; sister of John Crafts Wright); uncle of Susannah Tappan (who married Hiram Barney (1811-1895)); fourth cousin of Mason Weare Tappan.
  Political family: Tappan-Merrill-Wright family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Michael Walsh (1810-1859) — also known as Mike Walsh — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Youghal, County Cork, Ireland, May 4, 1810. Democrat. Convicted about 1845 for publication of a libel; member of New York state assembly, 1847-48, 1852 (New York County 1847, New York County 12th District 1848, 1852); U.S. Representative from New York 4th District, 1853-55. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., March 17, 1859 (age 48 years, 317 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
John Van_Buren John Van Buren (1810-1866) — also known as "Prince John" — of Albany, Albany County, N.Y. Born in Hudson, Columbia County, N.Y., February 10, 1810. Lawyer; New York state attorney general, 1845-47; appointed 1845; defeated, 1847, 1865; in September 1845, during a trial, he and opposing counsel Ambrose L. Jordan came to blows in the courtroom; both were sentenced to 24 hours solitary confinement in jail; his resignation as Attorney General was refused by the governor. Died, from exposure, on board the ship Scotia, en route from Liverpool to New York, in the North Atlantic Ocean, October 13, 1866 (age 56 years, 245 days). Interment at Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Martin Van Buren and Hannah (Hoes) Van Buren; married, June 22, 1841, to Elizabeth Vanderpoel (1810-1844); nephew of James Isaac Van Alen; second cousin once removed of Barent Van Buren; second cousin thrice removed of Dirck Ten Broeck (1686-1751) and Cornelis Cuyler; third cousin once removed of Thomas Brodhead Van Buren; third cousin twice removed of Harold Sheffield Van Buren; fourth cousin once removed of James Livingston.
  Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Ambrose Latting Jordan (1789-1865) — also known as Ambrose L. Jordan — of Cooperstown, Otsego County, N.Y.; Hudson, Columbia County, N.Y. Born in Hillsdale, Columbia County, N.Y., May 5, 1789. Whig. Lawyer; Otsego County Surrogate, 1815-18; Otsego County District Attorney, 1818-20; newspaper editor; member of New York state assembly from Columbia County, 1825; member of New York state senate 3rd District, 1826-29; resigned 1829; in September 1845, during a trial, he and the opposing counsel (New York Attorney General John Van Buren) came to blows in the courtroom; both were sentenced to 24 hours in jail; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1846; New York state attorney general, 1848-49. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 16, 1865 (age 76 years, 72 days). Interment at Hudson City Cemetery, Hudson, N.Y.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Louis Hargis (1802-1886) — also known as "Bally John" — of Jackson, Breathitt County, Ky.; Morehead, Rowan County, Ky. Born in Washington County, Va., March 4, 1802. Lawyer; Breathitt County Court Clerk; removed from office as Court Clerk, 1846, over unspecified charges against him; delegate to Kentucky state constitutional convention, 1849; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1855-57. Died in Morehead, Rowan County, Ky., April 2, 1886 (age 84 years, 29 days). Interment somewhere in Morehead, Ky.
  Relatives: Father-in-law of Archibald Calloway Cope (1828-1907); father of Thomas Frazier Hargis; uncle of John Seldon Hargis; granduncle of Alexander Hamilton Hargis and James Henderson Hargis.
  Political family: Cockrell-South family of Kentucky.
John C. Fremont John Charles Frémont (1813-1890) — also known as "The Pathfinder"; "The Champion of Freedom" — Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., January 21, 1813. Republican. Explorer; Military Governor of California, 1847; arrested for mutiny, 1847; court-martialed; found guilty of mutiny, disobedience, and conduct prejudicial to order; penalty remitted by Pres. James K. Polk; U.S. Senator from California, 1850-51; candidate for President of the United States, 1856; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; Governor of Arizona Territory, 1878-81; speaker, Republican National Convention, 1888. Episcopalian. French ancestry. Died, of peritonitis, in a hotel room at New York, New York County, N.Y., July 13, 1890 (age 77 years, 173 days). Original interment at Trinity Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.; reinterment in 1891 at Rockland Cemetery, Nyack, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Jean Charles Frémont and Ann Whiting (Pryor) Frémont; married, October 19, 1841, to Jessie Benton (daughter of Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858)).
  Political families: Benton family; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Selah Hill
  Fremont County, Colo., Fremont County, Idaho, Fremont County, Iowa and Fremont County, Wyo. are named for him.
  Fremont Peak, in Monterey County and San Benito County, California, is named for him.  — Fremont Peak, in Coconino County, Arizona, is named for him.  — The city of Fremont, California, is named for him.  — The city of Fremont, Ohio, is named for him.  — The city of Fremont, Nebraska, is named for him.
  Politician named for him: John F. Hill
  Campaign slogan (1856): "Free Soil, Free Men, Fremont."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by John C. Fremont: Memoirs of My Life and Times
  Books about John C. Fremont: Tom Chaffin, Pathfinder: John Charles Fremont and the Course of American Empire — David Roberts, A Newer World : Kit Carson, John C. Fremont and the Claiming of the American West — Andrew Rolle, John Charles Fremont: Character As Destiny
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  Lorenzo Brentano (1813-1891) — also known as Lorenz Peter Carl Brentano — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Mannheim, Germany, November 4, 1813. Republican. In Germany, he participated in the 1849 revolution; arrested and sentenced to life imprisonment; escaped to the United States; member of Illinois state house of representatives 61st District, 1863-65; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1864; Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1868; U.S. Consul in Dresden, 1872-76; U.S. Representative from Illinois 3rd District, 1877-79. German ancestry. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., September 18, 1891 (age 77 years, 318 days). Interment at Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Married to Caroline Brentano (1819-1893); father of Theodore Brentano (1854-1940).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph Barker (c.1806-1862) — of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa. Born in Allegheny County, Pa., about 1806. Mayor of Pittsburgh, Pa., 1850-51; defeated, 1851, 1852. In 1849, after an anti-Catholic speech, he was arrested, charged with using obscene language, obstructing the streets, and causing a riot, convicted, and sentenced to a year in prison; elected mayor in 1850 while still incarcerated. While mayor, he was twice arrested on charges of assault and battery. In 1851, he was convicted of riot. Struck and killed by a railroad train, in Ross Township, Allegheny County, Pa., August 2, 1862 (age about 56 years). Interment at Allegheny Cemetery, Pittsburgh, Pa.
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
  The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
  Information on this page — and on all other pages of this site — is believed to be accurate, but is not guaranteed. Users are advised to check with other sources before relying on any information here.  
  The official URL for this page is: https://politicalgraveyard.com/trouble/1800-1849.html.  
  Links to this or any other Political Graveyard page are welcome, but specific page addresses may sometimes change as the site develops.  
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  More information: FAQ; privacy policy; cemetery links.  
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Copyright notices: (1) Facts are not subject to copyright; see Feist v. Rural Telephone. (2) Politician portraits displayed on this site are 70-pixel-wide monochrome thumbnail images, which I believe to constitute fair use under applicable copyright law. Where possible, each image is linked to its online source. However, requests from owners of copyrighted images to delete them from this site are honored. (3) Original material, programming, selection and arrangement are © 1996-2019 Lawrence Kestenbaum. (4) This work is also licensed for free non-commercial re-use, with attribution, under a Creative Commons License.
Site information: The Political Graveyard is created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum, who is solely responsible for its structure and content. — The mailing address is The Political Graveyard, P.O. Box 2563, Ann Arbor MI 48106. — This site is hosted by HDL. — The Political Graveyard opened on July 1, 1996; the last full revision was done on March 10, 2021.

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