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Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble: 1910 to 1919

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in approximate chronological order

Jotham P. Allds Jotham Powers Allds (1865-1923) — also known as Jotham P. Allds — of Norwich, Chenango County, N.Y. Born in Claremont, Sullivan County, N.H., February 1, 1865. Republican. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Chenango County, 1896-1902; member of New York state senate, 1903-10 (26th District 1903-06, 27th District 1907-08, 37th District 1909-10); resigned 1910; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1908. Accused by Sen. Benn Conger, in 1910, of accepting bribes from bridge companies nine years earlier; following an investigation, the State Senate found him guilty by a vote of 40 to 9, and he resigned to avoid expulsion. Died, of liver disease, at Norwich Memorial Hospital, Norwich, Chenango County, N.Y., September 11, 1923 (age 58 years, 222 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Jotham Gillis Allds (1797-1866) and Lucy Charlotte (Powers) Allds (1820-1918).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: New York Red Book 1907
  Benn Conger (1856-1922) — of Groton, Tompkins County, N.Y. Born in Groton, Tompkins County, N.Y., October 29, 1856. President, Corona Typewriter Co.; member of New York state assembly from Tompkins County, 1900-01; member of New York state senate 41st District, 1909-10; resigned 1910. In 1910, he accused Sen. Jotham P. Allds, the majority leader, of accepting a bribe from bridge companies; Allds was investigated and ultimately resigned. Conger, who had also taken part in the bribery scheme, was criticized for not coming forward sooner; facing a likely attempt to expel him, he resigned a few days later. Died in Groton, Tompkins County, N.Y., February 28, 1922 (age 65 years, 122 days). Interment at Groton Rural Cemetery, Groton, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Corydon Wilson Conger (1826-1901) and Mary Jane (Brown) Conger (1830-1915); married 1880 to Florence C. Buck (1860-1945); third cousin twice removed of Hugh Conger; fourth cousin once removed of James Lockwood Conger, Anson Griffith Conger, Harmon Sweatland Conger, Omar Dwight Conger (1818-1898), Moore Conger, Frederick Ward Conger, Chauncey Stewart Conger and Charles Franklin Conger.
  Political families: Conger family of New York; Conger-Hungerford family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  George N. Rigby — of Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y.; Ormond Beach, Volusia County, Fla. Republican. Member of New York state assembly from Westchester County 1st District, 1904-05; member of condemnation commission for appraising property for site of proposed Hill View Reservoir in Westchester County; censured by the New York Supreme Court in 1910 for unnecessary delay, such as holding 65 hearings o one parcel; removed from the position in 1915 because he had moved to Florida; mayor of Ormond Beach, Fla., 1924-26. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Maud Lawrence (c.1882-1924; suicide).
  James Kellogg Apgar (1862-1940) — also known as James K. Apgar — of Peekskill, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Peekskill, Westchester County, N.Y., November 8, 1862. Republican. Private secretary and clerk to Assembly Speaker James W. Husted, 1884-87 and 1890; clerk to Assembly Speaker Fremont Cole, 1888-89; clerk to Lt. Gov. Charles T. Saxton, 1894-96; private secretary to Rep. William L. Ward, 1896-97; member of New York state assembly from Westchester County 3rd District, 1899-1907; defeated, 1897; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1900; member of condemnation commission for appraising property for site of proposed Hill View Reservoir in Westchester County; censured by the New York Supreme Court in 1910 for unnecessary delay, such as holding 65 hearings on one parcel; Westchester County Register, 1919-24; village president of Peekskill, New York, 1925-27. Member, Freemasons; Royal Arch Masons; Elks. Died in Peekskill, Westchester County, N.Y., September 21, 1940 (age 77 years, 318 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph A. Apgar and Eleanor (Herbert) Apgar; married, June 21, 1892, to Cecilia Annie Bellefeuille.
  William Bruce MacMaster, Jr. (1875-1912) — also known as William B. MacMaster, Jr. — of New York. Born, of American parents, in Colombia, June 28, 1875. Rancher; U.S. Vice Consul in Cartagena, 1904-08; U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul in Cartagena, 1908-12, died in office 1912; stabbed by two Colombians in the summer of 1909; pressed charges against his attackers, one of whom was an influential newspaper editor; arrested by Colombian authorities in June 1910 on charges that, years earlier, he shot a a Colombian citizen, in what he said was self-defense; initially acquitted, then found guilty, then exonerated by a higher court. While hunting alone, was shot multiple times and killed by an unknown assassin, near Cartagena, Colombia, August 11, 1912 (age 37 years, 44 days). Interment at Church and Convent of Santo Domingo, Cartagena, Colombia.
  Relatives: Son of William Bruce MacMaster (1838-1891).
  Hiram Charles Gill (1866-1919) — also known as Hiram C. Gill — of Seattle, King County, Wash. Born July 23, 1866. Republican. Mayor of Seattle, Wash., 1910-11, 1914-18; recalled 1911; defeated, 1912. Recalled from office as mayor in 1911 over his permissive attitude toward gambling and prostitution. Died January 7, 1919 (age 52 years, 168 days). Interment at Evergreen-Washelli Memorial Park, Seattle, Wash.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Berri (1848-1917) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., September 12, 1848. Republican. Carpet merchant; printing business; newspaper publisher; officer or director of banks, electric utilities, and the New York Telephone Company; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1904, 1908, 1912, 1916; delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1915; member, New York State Board of Regents, 1916-17. Congregationalist. Member, Union League. In 1911, he was arraigned on a charge of criminal libel over an article he published in his newspaper, brought by three candidates for Supreme Court, Herbert T. Ketcham, Patrick E. Callahan, and William Willett, Jr.; the case was withdrawn a few days later when the other two candidates discovered that Willett had indeed (as Berri charged) paid bribes for his nomination. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., April 19, 1917 (age 68 years, 219 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of William Berri ; married 1869 to Frances Williams Morris (died c.1910).
  Clarence Seward Darrow (1857-1938) — also known as Clarence S. Darrow — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Kinsman, Trumbull County, Ohio, April 18, 1857. Democrat. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1896; member of Illinois state house of representatives 17th District, 1903-05; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1904, 1924. Member, American Civil Liberties Union. Defense attorney for, among many others, Patrick Eugene Prendergast, who murdered Chicago mayor Carter H. Harrison. In 1911, he was charged with bribing jurors in a California case; tried and acquitted; a second trial resulted in a hung jury. Famously cross-examined William Jennings Bryan during the 1925 "Scopes Monkey Trial.". Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., March 13, 1938 (age 80 years, 329 days). Cremated; ashes scattered; statue at Rhea County Courthouse Grounds, Dayton, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Amirus Darrow and Emily (Eddy) Darrow.
  Cross-reference: William B. Lloyd
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books by Clarence Darrow: Why I Am an Agnostic and Other Essays — The Story of My Life
  Books about Clarence Darrow: Arthur Weinberg, ed., Attorney for the Damned: Clarence Darrow in the Courtroom — Mike Papantonio, Clarence Darrow, the journeyman — Irving Stone, Clarence Darrow for the Defense — Richard J. Jensen, Clarence Darrow : The Creation of an American Myth — Geoffrey Cowan, The People v. Clarence Darrow : The Bribery Trial of America's Greatest Lawyer
  William H. Bradley (1859-1925) — of Greenville, Montcalm County, Mich. Born in Spencer Township, Kent County, Mich., February 26, 1859. Republican. Wholesale grocer; mayor of Greenville, Mich., 1908-09; member of Michigan state senate 18th District, 1909-12. In 1911, he was accused of bribery by Sherman M. Townsend, a former Sergeant-at-Arms of the state senate; an investigation was conducted; a resolution to expel him from the Senate failed on a vote of 14 to 15. Died in 1925 (age about 66 years). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Greenville, Mich.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Edward M. Grout Edward Marshall Grout (1861-1931) — also known as Edward M. Grout — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Greens Farms, Westport, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 27, 1861. Democrat. Lawyer; law partner of William J. Gaynor, later New York City mayor; candidate for mayor of Brooklyn, N.Y., 1895; borough president of Brooklyn, New York, 1898-1901; New York City Controller, 1902-05; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1904; president of Union Bank in Brooklyn; after the bank closed in 1911, he was indicted for perjury, based on the sworn report he had made of the bank's condition to the New York Banking Department; tried in 1915 and convicted; sentenced to prison; in 1916 the conviction was overturned, and he was not retried. Died in Greens Farms, Westport, Fairfield County, Conn., November 9, 1931 (age 70 years, 13 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Grout and Fanny (Marshall) Grout; married, June 4, 1889, to Ida L. Loeschigk (died 1929); descendant *** of Jonathan Grout (1737-1807).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, November 1901
  Lawrence Gresser (1851-1935) — also known as Lorenz Gresser; "Honest Larry" — of Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in Bavaria, Germany, January 1, 1851. Shoe manufacturer; borough president of Queens, New York, 1908-11; removed 1911; removed from office as borough president by Gov. John A. Dix, for neglect of duty in failing to prevent corruption among his subordinates. Died, in the rectory of the Church of the Holy Family, Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., January 30, 1935 (age 84 years, 29 days). Interment at St. John's Cemetery, Middle Village, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Johann Gresser (1821-1874) and Phillipina (Bingert) Gresser (1827-1882); married 1869 to Margaret Beck (died 1901); married 1904 to Kathryn Beechinor; father of Lawrence Thomas Gresser; grandfather of Lawrence T. Gresser, Jr. (1912?-?).
  Political family: Gresser family of New York.
  Harry M. Schriver — of Rock Island, Rock Island County, Ill. Mayor of Rock Island, Ill., 1911-15, 1919-23; on March 22, 1912, angry over personal attacks published by newspaper publisher and crime syndicate boss John Looney, he had Looney brought to the Rock Island police station and gave him a severe beating; during a riot on March 27, a sniper shot at the mayor in his office; convicted in 1923 on vice protection conspiracy charges. Burial location unknown.
  William Forte Willett, Jr. (1869-1938) — also known as William Willett, Jr. — of Far Rockaway, Queens, Queens County, N.Y.; Woodmere, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., November 27, 1869. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from New York 14th District, 1907-11; defeated, 1904; candidate for Justice of New York Supreme Court 2nd District, 1911; indicted in 1912 on charges that he bought the nomination for Supreme Court justice; tried and convicted in 1914, sentenced to one year in prison and fined $1,000; released on parole in 1916. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Elks. Died, from a heart attack, in his room at the Hotel McAlpin, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., February 12, 1938 (age 68 years, 77 days). Interment at The Evergreens Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of William Willett and Marion Willett; married 1895 to Marie Rebecca Van Tassel (1872-1950).
  Cross-reference: William Berri — Joseph Cassidy
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Wodrow Archbald (1848-1926) — also known as Robert W. Archbald — of Scranton, Lackawanna County, Pa. Born in Carbondale, Lackawanna County, Pa., September 10, 1848. Lawyer; common pleas court judge in Pennsylvania, 1884-88; district judge in Pennsylvania, 1888-1901; U.S. District Judge for the Middle District of Pennsylvania, 1901-11; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit, 1911-13; removed 1913. Impeached by the U.S. House of Representatives in 1912 on conflict of interest charges; convicted (removed from office) by the U.S. Senate on four articles of impeachment. Died, from a heart attack, in Martha's Vineyard, Dukes County, Mass., August 19, 1926 (age 77 years, 343 days). Interment at Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of James Archbald and Augusta (Frothingham) Archbald; married, January 21, 1875, to Elizabeth Baldwin Cannon.
  See also federal judicial profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Cornelius Hanford (1849-1926) — of Seattle, King County, Wash. Born in Van Buren County, Iowa, April 21, 1849. Republican. Lawyer; member Washington territorial council, 1877; member of Washington territorial House of Representatives, 1889-90; U.S. District Judge for Washington, 1890-1905; U.S. District Judge for the Western District of Washington, 1905-12; resigned 1912. Member, Sons of the American Revolution. Resigned as judge under threat of impeachment, 1912. Died in 1926 (age about 77 years). Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Seattle, Wash.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Hanford and Abby J. (Holgate) Hanford; married, November 15, 1875, to Clara M. Baldwin.
  Joseph Cassidy (c.1866-1920) — also known as "Curley Joe"; "The King of Queens" — of Long Island City (now part of Queens), Queens County, N.Y.; Far Rockaway, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born about 1866. Democrat. Borough president of Queens, New York, 1902-05; defeated, 1905, 1909; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1904; leader of Queens County Democratic Party, 1910-11; indicted in 1912 for selling a nomination for for Supreme Court Justice to William Willett; convicted in 1914, and sentenced to one year to eighteen months in prison; released in 1916. Suffered a stroke of apoplexy, and died soon after, in Far Rockaway, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., November 21, 1920 (age about 54 years). Burial location unknown.
Thomas E. Watson Thomas Edward Watson (1856-1922) — also known as Thomas E. Watson — of Thomson, McDuffie County, Ga. Born in Columbia County, Ga., September 5, 1856. Lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1882-83; Presidential Elector for Georgia, 1888; U.S. Representative from Georgia 10th District, 1891-93; Populist candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1896; Populist candidate for President of the United States, 1904, 1908; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 1912; controversial for his writings attacking the Catholic Church; arrested in 1912 on obscenity charges over three chapters in his book The Catholic Hierarchy; tried and acquitted in 1916; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1921-22; died in office 1922. Died September 26, 1922 (age 66 years, 21 days). Interment at Thomson Cemetery, Thomson, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of John S. Watson and Ann Eliza (Maddox) Watson.
  Cross-reference: John I. Kelley
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, September 1908
  John Looney (1865-1942) — also known as Patrick John Looney — of Rock Island, Rock Island County, Ill. Born in Ottawa, La Salle County, Ill., October 5, 1865. Lawyer; newspaper publisher; indicted with others in 1897 over a scheme to defraud the city of Rock Island in connection with a storm drain construction project; convicted, but the verdict was overturned on appeal; candidate for Illinois state house of representatives, 1900; created and led a crime syndicate in northwest Illinois, with interests in gambling, prostitution, extortion, and eventually bootlegging and automobile theft; indicted in 1907 on 37 counts of bribery, extortion, and libel, but acquitted; shot and wounded by hidden snipers on two occasions in 1908; on February 22, 1909, he was shot and wounded in a gunfight with business rival W. W. Wilmerton; on March 22, 1912, after publishing personal attacks on Rock Island Mayor Henry M. Schriver, he was arrested, brought to the police station, and severely beaten by the mayor himself; subsequent rioting killed two men and injured nine others; resumed control of the Rock Island rackets in 1921; in 1922, he was indicted for the murder of saloon keeper William Gabel, who had provided evidence against Looney to federal agents; arrested in Belen, N.M., in 1924, and later convicted of conspiracy and murder; sentenced to 5 years in prison for conspiracy and 14 years for murder; served 8 1/2 years. Irish ancestry. Died, of tuberculosis, in a sanitarium at El Paso, El Paso County, Tex., 1942 (age about 76 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Patrick Looney and Margaret Looney; married 1892 to Nora O'Connor (died 1903); nephew of Maurice T. Maloney (1853?-?).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Eugene F. Vacheron — of Ozone Park, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly, 1894-95, 1901 (Queens County 3rd District 1894-95, Queens County 2nd District 1901); resigned 1895; charged with bribery in 1895; tried and acquitted, but resigned from the Assembly; convicted of grand larceny, February 28, 1912. Burial location unknown.
Frank S. Sidway Frank St. John Sidway (1869-1938) — also known as Frank S. Sidway — of Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y. Born December 15, 1869. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; lawyer; chair of Erie County Republican Party, 1910; in 1912, he was found guilty of civil contempt in connection with his brother's divorce case, and fined $900; later, an appellate court reversed this decision; candidate in primary for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1914. Died, from a heart attack, in Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y., January 17, 1938 (age 68 years, 33 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Franklin Sidway and Charlotte (Spalding) Sidway; married to Amelia Roberts (died 1972).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Library of Congress
William Lorimer William Lorimer (1861-1934) — also known as "The Blond Boss" — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Manchester, England, April 27, 1861. Republican. Real estate business; contractor; brick manufacturer; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1895-1901, 1903-09 (2nd District 1895-1901, 6th District 1903-09); delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1896, 1904, 1908; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1909-12. Scottish ancestry. He was accused of bribery in winning election to the Senate; in 1912, the Senate invalidated his election. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., September 13, 1934 (age 73 years, 139 days). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, Ill.
  Relatives: Married to Susan Mooney (1863-1918).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Autobiographies and Portraits of the President, Cabinet, etc. (1899)
  Washington G. Lithgow (1840-1925) — also known as Washington Lithgow — of Charlestown, Middlesex County (now part of Boston, Suffolk County), Mass.; Plainfield, Union County, N.J.; Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. Born, of American parents, in Puerto Plata, Santo Domingo (now Dominican Republic), July 4, 1840. Republican. U.S. Vice Consul in Puerto Plata, 1875-99; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1880; Consul-General for Dominican Republic in San Juan, P.R., 1899; in 1912, due to his alleged support for rebels, he was ordered expelled from the Dominican Republic; the U.S. State Department interceded in his behalf, and the order was revoked. Died in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic, December 8, 1925 (age 85 years, 157 days). Interment somewhere in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic.
  Relatives: Married, July 17, 1863, to Ellen Prentiss Peirce; grandfather of Arthur Washington Lithgow (1915-2004; actor and director); great-grandfather of John Arthur Lithgow (born 1945; American actor in theater, television, and movies).
William Sulzer William Sulzer (1863-1941) — also known as "Plain Bill" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Elizabeth, Union County, N.J., March 18, 1863. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly, 1890-94, 1914 (New York County 14th District 1890-92, New York County 10th District 1893-94, New York County 6th District 1914); Speaker of the New York State Assembly, 1893; U.S. Representative from New York, 1895-1912 (11th District 1895-1903, 10th District 1903-12); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1896, 1900, 1912 (speaker); Governor of New York, 1913; removed 1913; defeated, 1914, 1914. Presbyterian. German and Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Impeached and removed from office as governor, 1913. Died in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., November 6, 1941 (age 78 years, 233 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Sulzer and Lydia Sulzer; brother of Charles August Sulzer (1879-1919); married, January 7, 1908, to Clara Rodelheim.
  Cross-reference: Alexander S. Bacon
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: Men of Mark in America (1906)
J. Edward Addicks John Edward Charles O'Sullivan Addicks (1841-1919) — also known as J. Edward Addicks; "Gas Addicks"; "Napoleon of Gas"; "Frenzied Financier" — of Claymont, New Castle County, Del. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., November 21, 1841. Republican. Flour merchant; built and controlled the illuminating gas industry in Boston and other cities; tried for years without success to win a seat in the U.S. Senate; member of Republican National Committee from Delaware, 1904; delegate to Republican National Convention from Delaware, 1904; arrested in New York, 1913, over his refusal to acknowledge money judgements against him by creditors, and released on bond; jailed in 1915 for contempt of court. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., August 7, 1919 (age 77 years, 259 days). Interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of John E. C. O'Sullivan Addicks and Margaretta McLeod (Turner) Addicks; married 1864 to Laura Wattson Butcher; married to Rosalie Butcher; married, December 14, 1898, to Ida (Carr) Wilson.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Library of Congress
  David Dows (1885-1966) — also known as "Big Dave" — of Locust Valley, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y.; Bradley, Greenwood County, S.C. Born in Irvington, Westchester County, N.Y., August 12, 1885. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; worked in iron and steel mills; supervised construction of steel mills overseas; studied foreign industries as representative of a steamship line; horse breeder; bank director; Nassau County Sheriff, 1932-34; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1944; member, New York State Racing Commission, 1944-49; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 1956; South Carolina Republican state chair, 1956-58; candidate for Presidential Elector for South Carolina, 1956. Convicted of assault in 1913, over his treatment of a New York Times reporter who was attempting to interview him. Died in Hot Springs, Bath County, Va., August 13, 1966 (age 81 years, 1 days). Interment at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of David Dows (1857-1899) and Jane (Strahan) Dows (1859-1945); married, December 12, 1911, to Mary Gwendolyn Townsend Burden; married, May 19, 1937, to Emily Schweizer; father of Evelyn Byrd Dows (1912-1997; daughter-in-law of Cornelius Newton Bliss, Jr. (1874-1949)).
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Dows-Burden family of New York City, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Stephen J. Stilwell (1866-1942) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y.; Mamaroneck, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in New York, May 10, 1866. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state senate 21st District, 1909-13; removed 1913; charged in 1913 with extorting a bribe of $3,500 from George H. Kendall, president of the New York Bank Note company, over a bill that Kendall supported; tried in the State Senate and found not guilty on April 15 by a vote of 28 to 21; indicted on May 12 by a grand jury for soliciting a bribe; tried soon after, and convicted on May 24; this removed him from office; sentenced to four to eight years in prison; after his release, he moved to Mamaroneck and entered the real estate business; indicted in 1934 on charges that he defrauded his former stenographer of $9,000 when she came to him seeking a Naval Academy appointment for her son, but the case did not go to trial; arrested in March 1941 and indicted in April on charges that he attempted to bribe a Mamaroneck village trustee $1,000 to obtain a police job for an associate; pleaded guilty, but never sentenced; while incarcerated, his legs were amputated. Died, while a prisoner awaiting sentence, in Grasslands Hospital, Valhalla, Westchester County, N.Y., April 20, 1942 (age 75 years, 345 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Mary Delia (Archer) Stilwell (1833-1925) and William Jewitt Stilwell; married, February 14, 1887, to Celia A. Blanck.
  Carlton Prouty (1864-1931) — of Winnetka, Cook County, Ill. Born in Washington, D.C., November 20, 1864. Republican. Lawyer; insurance business; real estate dealer; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1908. In May, 1913, he was fined $500, and sentenced to three months in the county jail, for having violated the Illinois law which prohibits the remarriage of divorced persons within one year; he had married his former stenographer four days after being divorced from his first wife. Died in Evanston, Cook County, Ill., December 10, 1931 (age 67 years, 20 days). Interment at Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Merrick Franklin Prouty (1829-1898) and Anne Elizabeth (Jenks) Prouty; married 1913 to Mary Busscher; third cousin once removed of John Azro Prouty; fourth cousin of Charles Azro Prouty and George Herbert Prouty (1862-1918).
  Political family: Prouty family of Newport, Vermont.
  Upton Beall Sinclair (1878-1968) — also known as Upton Sinclair — of California. Born in Baltimore, Md., September 20, 1878. Novelist and social crusader; author of The Jungle, about the meat-packing industry in Chicago; arrested in 1914 for picketing in front of the Standard Oil Building in New York; Socialist candidate for U.S. Representative from California 10th District, 1920; Socialist candidate for U.S. Senator from California, 1922; candidate for Governor of California, 1926 (Socialist), 1930 (Socialist), 1934 (Democratic); Socialist candidate for Presidential Elector for California, 1928, 1932; received the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1943 for the novel Dragon's Teeth. Member, United World Federalists; League for Industrial Democracy; American Civil Liberties Union. Died in Bound Brook, Somerset County, N.J., November 25, 1968 (age 90 years, 66 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Cross-reference: Harry W. Laidler
  Campaign slogan (1934): "End Poverty in California."
  See also NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Upton Sinclair: I, Candidate for Governor and How I Got Licked (1934)
  Fiction by Upton Sinclair: The Jungle — Oil! A Novel — The Moneychangers — Dragons Teeth — Wide is the Gate
  Books about Upton Sinclair: Lauren Coodley, ed., Land of Orange Groves and Jails: Upton Sinclair's California — Greg Mitchell, The Campaign of the Century: Upton Sinclair's E.P.I.C. Race for Governor of California and the Birth of Media Politics — Kevin Mattson, Upton Sinclair and the Other American Century — Anthony Arthur, Radical Innocent: Upton Sinclair
  Miles R. Frisbie — of Schenectady, Schenectady County, N.Y. Member of New York state assembly from Schenectady County, 1907-08; charged with grand larceny and forgery, for obtaining $2,500 on fraudulent bonds and mortgages; tried on one charge of obtaining $1,000 from a woman in exchange for a fraudulent mortgage; pleaded insanity; convicted on June 12, 1914; sentenced to 5-10 years in prison. Burial location unknown.
  Edward Hull Crump (1874-1954) — also known as Edward H. Crump; Ed Crump; "Boss Crump" — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born near Holly Springs, Marshall County, Miss., October 2, 1874. Democrat. Head, E. H. Crump Buggy Manufacturing Co.; president, E. H. Crump & Co. (involved in banking, real estate, and insurance); mayor of Memphis, Tenn., 1910-16, 1940; resigned 1916; proceedings were brought for his ouster as mayor in 1915-16, based on charges that he failed to enforce state liquor laws; when the ouster suit was upheld by the state supreme court, he resigned; Shelby County Treasurer, 1917-23; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1936, 1940, 1944; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1931-35 (10th District 1931-33, 9th District 1933-35); member of Democratic National Committee from Tennessee, 1936-45. Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., October 16, 1954 (age 80 years, 14 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn.
  Relatives: Married to Bessie Byrd McLean.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Books about Edward Hull Crump: William D. Miller, Mr. Crump of Memphis
  Thomas Mott Osborne (1859-1926) — also known as Thomas M. Osborne; "Tom Brown" — of Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y. Born in Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y., September 23, 1859. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1896, 1924; Independent candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1898; mayor of Auburn, N.Y., 1903-05. Son of the founder of International Harvester; prison reformer; New York State Public Service Commissioner; New York State Fish and Game Commissioner, 1911; warden of Sing Sing Prison, Ossining, N.Y., 1914-16; indicted by a grand jury in 1915 for alleged perjury and neglect of duty; tried, but the charges were dismissed; commander of naval prison, Portsmouth, N.H., 1917-20. Died in Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y., October 20, 1926 (age 67 years, 27 days). Interment at Fort Hill Cemetery, Auburn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of David Munson Osborne and Eliza Lidy (Wright) Osborne (1830-1911); married 1886 to Agnes Devens (1865-1896); father of Charles Devens Osborne and Lithgow Osborne; first cousin six times removed of Benjamin Franklin; second cousin once removed of Charles Taylor Sherman, Barzillai Bulkeley Kellogg, William Tecumseh Sherman, Lampson Parker Sherman and John Sherman; third cousin once removed of Wharton Barker; third cousin thrice removed of Ira Yale; fourth cousin of Dwight Arthur Silliman; fourth cousin once removed of Howkin Bulkley Beardslee, Henry Jarvis Raymond, Edwin Olmstead Keeler (1846-1923) and Asbury Elliott Kellogg.
  Political families: Sherman family of Connecticut; Keeler-Floyd-Sherman-Bangs family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Donn M. Roberts (1867-1936) — of Indiana. Born in Annapolis, Crawford County, Ill., September 28, 1867. Mayor of Terre Haute, Ind., 1913-15. Convicted of bribery in 1915 and spent three and a half years in prison; convicted of embezzlement in 1936 and sentenced to prison. Released from prison following a heart attack, and died a few days later, in Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind., August 3, 1936 (age 68 years, 310 days). Interment at St. Joseph's Cemetery, Terre Haute, Ind.
Edward E. McCall Edward Everett McCall (1863-1924) — also known as Edward E. McCall — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., January 6, 1863. Democrat. Lawyer; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1903-13; resigned 1913; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1913; chair, New York State Public Service Commission, 1913-15; removed from office in November, 1915, because he owned stock in a company under commission jurisdiction; president, New Jersey Life Insurance Company, 1916. Died, of pneumonia, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., March 12, 1924 (age 61 years, 66 days). Burial location unknown.
  Presumably named for: Edward Everett
  Relatives: Son of John McCall and Katherine McCall; brother of John A. McCall (president, New York Life Insurance Company); married 1886 to Ella Frances Gaynor.
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Frank Buchanan (1862-1930) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born near Madison, Jefferson County, Ind., June 14, 1862. Democrat. Ironworker; U.S. Representative from Illinois 7th District, 1911-17; in 1915, when the U.S. was still neutral in World War I, he was president of "Labor's National Peace Council," which advocated a weapons embargo against the countries then at war; the organization secretly received funding from German agents; when a grand jury investigation was announced, he retaliated by introducing resolutions to impeach U.S. Attorney H. Snowden Marshall; indicted in December 1915, along with H. Robert Fowler, Frank S. Monnett, and others, for restraint of trade over the Peace Council's attempts to foment strikes in U.S. munitions plants; stood trial in May 1917, along with (ultimately) six co-defendants; the jury convicted three, but deadlocked over the other four, including Buchanan; he was not re-tried. Died, of heart disease, in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., April 18, 1930 (age 67 years, 308 days). Interment at Irving Park Boulevard Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Buchanan and Emeline (Connor) Buchanan; married, March 17, 1898, to Minnie Murphy.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Hiram Robert Fowler (1851-1926) — also known as H. Robert Fowler — of Elizabethtown, Hardin County, Ill. Born near Eddyville, Pope County, Ill., February 7, 1851. Democrat. Member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1893-95; member of Illinois state senate, 1900-04; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1908; U.S. Representative from Illinois 24th District, 1911-15; defeated, 1924; in 1915, when the U.S. was still neutral in World War I, he was general counsel for "Labor's National Peace Council," which advocated a weapons embargo against the countries then at war; the organization secretly received funding from German agents; indicted in December 1915, along with Frank Buchanan, Frank S. Monnett, and others, for restraint of trade over the Peace Council's attempts to foment strikes in U.S. munitions plants; stood trial in May 1917, along with (ultimately) six co-defendants; the jury convicted three, but deadlocked over the other four, including Fowler; he was not re-tried. Died January 5, 1926 (age 74 years, 332 days). Interment at Sunset Hill Cemetery, Harrisburg, Ill.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Frank Sylvestor Monnett (b. 1857) — also known as Frank S. Monnett — of Crawford County, Ohio. Born in Kenton, Hardin County, Ohio, March 19, 1857. Lawyer; Ohio state attorney general, 1896-1900; defeated in Democratic primary, 1926; Democratic candidate for U.S. Representative from Ohio 12th District, 1910; in 1915, when the U.S. was still neutral in World War I, he was a committee chair in "Labor's National Peace Council," which advocated a weapons embargo against the countries then at war; the organization secretly received funding from German agents; indicted in December 1915, along with H. Robert Fowler, Frank Buchanan, and others, for restraint of trade over the Peace Council's attempts to foment strikes in U.S. munitions plants; stood trial with seven co-defendants, but during the trial, the charges against him were dismissed. Died in Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Interment at Monnett Chapel Graveyard, Dallas Township, Crawford County, Ohio.
  Hudson Snowden Marshall (1870-1931) — also known as H. Snowden Marshall — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Baltimore, Md., January 15, 1870. Lawyer; law partner of Bartow S. Weeks, George Gordon Battle, and James A. O'Gorman; U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, 1913-17; in 1915-16, U.S. Rep. Frank Buchanan (who was at the time being indicted by a federal grand jury) introduced impeachment resolutions against Marshall; the charges, including malfeasance in the handling of past cases, were investigated by a House Judiciary subcommittee, which held hearings in New York, and inquired into the proceedings of the grand jury which had indicted Rep. Buchanan; Marshall wrote a critical letter to the subcommittee, impugning its motives; based on this letter, the full House voted to find him in contempt of Congress, and ordered his arrest; on appeal, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the authority of the House to punish for contempt extended only to actions which directly interfered with its proceedings. Member, American Bar Association. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 29, 1931 (age 61 years, 134 days). Interment at Kensico Cemetery, Valhalla, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Marshall and Rebecca (Snowden) Marshall; brother of Emily Rosalie Snowden Marshall (1858-1940; who married Somerville Pinkney Tuck); married 1900 to Isabel C. Stiles; uncle of Somerville Pinkney Tuck, Jr. (1891-1967); great-grandnephew of John Marshall.
  Political family: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
Roy Shattuck Roy Lloyd Shattuck (1871-1915) — also known as Roy Shattuck — of Brazil, Clay County, Ind. Born in Clay County, Ind., June 2, 1871. Republican. Lawyer; mayor of Brazil, Ind., 1903-09; candidate for U.S. Representative from Indiana 5th District, 1914. Arrested in February 1915, and arraigned in federal court in Indianapolis, along with four other 1914 candidates, for attempting to corrupt the election in Vigo County; pleaded not guilty, but died before he could be tried. Died in Brazil, Clay County, Ind., August 15, 1915 (age 44 years, 74 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Volney B. Shattuck and Henrietta Bessie (Pearce) Shattuck; married, November 7, 1894, to Olive Rosamond Carter.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Charles Edward Sebastian (1873-1929) — also known as Charles E. Sebastian — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Farmington, St. Francois County, Mo., March 30, 1873. Democrat. Police officer; Los Angeles Chief of Police, 1911-15; in 1915, he was accused of molesting several teenage girls in a rooming house next to the police station; indicted by the county grand jury for contributing to the delinquency of a minor; also indicted for criminal contempt of court for attempting to influence grand jurors; won election for mayor while these cases were pending; tried and acquitted on the molestation charge, but found guilty of contempt for interference with the grand jury; mayor of Los Angeles, Calif., 1915-16; resigned 1916; defeated, 1917. Died April 17, 1929 (age 56 years, 18 days). Interment at Glen Haven Memorial Park, Sylmar, Calif.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Green Crow (1883-1942) — also known as Robert G. Crow; Bob Crow — of Caruthersville, Pemiscot County, Mo. Born in Scott County, Mo., December 24, 1883. Republican. Insurance agent; postmaster at Caruthersville, Mo., 1909-14; indicted in October 1915 on federal charges of revealing information from the federal civil service examination, to help his half-brother, James L. Crow; pleaded guilty in April 1916, and was fined $500. Member, Elks; Eagles; Modern Woodmen. On December 21, 1914, he mysteriously disappeared from the Pontiac Hotel, St. Louis, Mo., leaving behind all of his clothes, and the room disordered as if a scuffle had taken place; he was thought to have been kidnapped and murdered by a gang, but a few months later, he was found to be serving in the U.S. Army. Died in Harlingen, Cameron County, Tex., September 16, 1942 (age 58 years, 266 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of James Levi Eugene Elijah Crow (1846-1896) and Mahulda Paralee (Rodden) Crow (1860-1884); half-brother of Charles Augustus Crow (1873-1938); married, September 16, 1904, to Ella Pauline Brown (1884-1922).
  James Mark Sullivan (1873-1933) — also known as James M. Sullivan — of New York. Born in Ireland, 1873. U.S. Minister to Dominican Republic, 1913-15. Participated in the 1916 Easter Uprising in Ireland; arrested by the British authorities, but not executed due to his American diplomatic passport. Died in 1933 (age about 60 years). Interment at Glasnevin Cemetery, Dublin, Ireland.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Olney Arnold (1861-1916) — of Providence, Providence County, R.I. Born in Cumberland, Providence County, R.I., September 8, 1861. Democrat. Treasurer and manager Rogers Screw Company; president, Angell Land Company; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Rhode Island, 1888; member of Rhode Island state house of representatives, 1908; candidate for Governor of Rhode Island, 1908, 1909; U.S. Diplomatic Agent to Egypt, 1913-16, died in office 1916; U.S. Consul General in Cairo, 1914-16, died in office 1916; under investigation in 1916 on charges of making unneutral utterances. Unitarian. Died in Lisbon, Portugal, March 5, 1916 (age 54 years, 179 days). Interment at Swan Point Cemetery, Providence, R.I.
  Relatives: Son of William G. Arnold and Lucy M. (Aldrich) Arnold; married, April 12, 1889, to Grace Angell.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Victor Hugo Duras — also known as Victor H. Duras — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Nebraska. Republican. Candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1908 (12th District), 1910 (14th District); alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1912; U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul in Liège, 1913-14; U.S. Vice Consul in Petrograd, 1914-15; arrested in August, 1916, in Russia, on suspicion of being a German spy; freed in 1917. Burial location unknown.
  Presumably named for: Victor Hugo
  Arthur Elmer Reimer (1882-1969) — also known as Arthur E. Reimer — of Massachusetts. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., January 15, 1882. Socialist. Tailor; lawyer; Socialist Labor candidate for President of the United States, 1912, 1916; Socialist Labor candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1913, 1914; jailed in Butte, Montana, 1916, for making a radical speech. Died in 1969 (age about 87 years). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Caleb Harrison — of Illinois. Socialist. Socialist Labor candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1916; jailed in Homestead, Pennsylvania in 1916 for making a radical speech. Burial location unknown.
  Earl Russel Browder (1891-1973) — also known as Earl Browder — of Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Wichita, Sedgwick County, Kan., May 20, 1891. Communist. As a result of his opposition to U.S. participation in World War I, he was convicted in 1917 of conspiracy against the draft laws and sentenced to sixteen months in prison; imprisoned again in 1919; pardoned in 1933; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1930 (6th District), 1932 (20th District), 1940 (14th District); General Secretary of the Communist Party of the U.S., 1934-44; candidate for President of the United States, 1936, 1940; arrested in 1939 for a passport violation, convicted, and sentenced to four years in prison (sentence commuted after fourteen months); expelled from the Communist Party, 1946. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., June 27, 1973 (age 82 years, 38 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Browder and Martha (Hankins) Browder; married 1926 to Raissa Berkman.
  Cross-reference: George E. Powers
  See also Wikipedia article
  Charles M. Slaughter — of Athens, Athens County, Ohio. Mayor of Athens, Ohio, 1910-14. Charged with misconduct as justice of the peace; convicted on a lesser charge of misappropriating public funds; served about a year in prison; pardoned; made restitution. Burial location unknown.
  William H. Reynolds (1868-1931) — of Long Beach, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., February 29, 1868. Republican. Builder; real estate developer; member of New York state senate 3rd District, 1894-95; indicted by a grand jury in August 1917 for perjury, over his 1912 expert testimony on the value of land sought by the city for a park; the grand jury alleged that he falsely denied any personal interest in the realty company which owned the property; also indicted in October 1917, with three others, for conspiracy defraud the city of $500,000 by inflating the appraisal; the indictments were dismissed in May 1920 over the prosecutor's delay of the trial; village president of Long Beach, New York, 1921-22; mayor of Long Beach, N.Y., 1922-24; removed 1924; defeated, 1925; indicted on May 1, 1924, along with the Long Beach city treasurer, for misappropriating city funds in connection with a bond issue; tried in June 1924, convicted, sentenced to six months in the county jail, and automatically removed from office as mayor; released pending appeal; the Appellate Division reversed the conviction in June 1925 and ordered a new trial; the indictment was dismissed in June 1927. English and Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Elks; Freemasons. Died, from heart disease, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 13, 1931 (age 63 years, 0 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of William Reynolds and Margaret (McChesney) Reynolds; married to Elise Guerrier.
  Samuel Crockett Sims — of Hazen, Prairie County, Ark. Member of Arkansas state senate 12th District, 1915-17; expelled 1917. In January, 1917, when Anti-Trading Stamp and Coupon bills were pending before his committee, he accepted a bribe to kill the bills, from a detective posing as a lobbyist for Eastern trading-stamp interests; arrested, charged with bribery, and later convicted; expelled from the Senate on a vote of 25 to 8. Burial location unknown.
  Ivison C. Burgess — of Russellville, Pope County, Ark. Member of Arkansas state senate 4th District, 1915-17; expelled 1917. In January, 1917, after he introduced legislation to regulate trading stamps and coupons, he accepted a bribe to kill the bills, from a detective posing as a lobbyist for Eastern trading-stamp interests; arrested, charged with bribery, and later convicted; expelled from the Senate on a vote of 25 to 8. Burial location unknown.
  Charles W. Dempster (c.1879-1941) — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa, about 1879. Republican. Lawyer; member of Montana state house of representatives, 1901-02; Supreme Secretary of the Fraternal Brotherhood, an insurance union; on February 1, 1917, when he was ousted by the brotherhood's Supreme Council on grounds of insubordination, he drew a revolver and held the council at bay for ten minutes; after being disarmed by a private detective, he was arrested for disturbing the peace; candidate in primary for California state senate 31st District, 1920; member of California state assembly, 1931-34 (57th District 1931-32, 61st District 1933-34); candidate for mayor of Los Angeles, Calif., 1932, 1933 (primary). Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Elks; Odd Fellows; Eagles. Died in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., July 20, 1941 (age about 62 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Grace Warner.
James E. Ferguson James Edward Ferguson (1871-1944) — also known as James E. Ferguson; "Pa Ferguson" — of Temple, Bell County, Tex. Born near Salado, Bell County, Tex., August 31, 1871. Democrat. Governor of Texas, 1915-17; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1916 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee). Indicted on embezzlement and other charges in 1917; soon after, was impeached by the Texas House, and removed from office by the Texas Senate. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., September 21, 1944 (age 73 years, 21 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Married, December 31, 1899, to Miriam Amanda Wallace (1875-1961).
  Cross-reference: M. M. Crane
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Blaine Jackson Brickwood (1888-1949) — also known as Blaine J. Brickwood — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., February 5, 1888. Lawyer; Honorary Consul for Venezuela in Chicago, Ill., 1915-20; on November 18, 1917, while driving, he struck and killed Walter Israel; censured by the coroner's jury which investigated the death; indicted on a charge of manslaughter; following a trial in June 1920, he was found not guilty by a jury; meanwhile, he was arrested on a charge of embezzlement. Died in Cook County, Ill., March 13, 1949 (age 61 years, 36 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Genevieve (Jackson) Brickwood (1851-1938) and Albert William Brickwood (1854-1915); brother of Albert William Brickwood, Jr. (1879-1941); married, November 16, 1912, to Bertie H. Meloy; nephew of John Thomas Brickwood.
  Political family: Brickwood family of Chicago and Forest Park, Illinois.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Victor L. Berger Victor Luitpold Berger (1860-1929) — also known as Victor L. Berger — of Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis. Born in Nieder-Rehbach, Austria, February 28, 1860. Socialist. Emigrated to the United States in 1878; school teacher; newspaper editor; U.S. Representative from Wisconsin 5th District, 1911-13, 1919, 1923-29; defeated, 1904, 1920; candidate for U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, 1918; delegate to Socialist National Convention from Wisconsin, 1920; Chairman of Socialist Party, 1927-29. Jewish ancestry. Member, International Typographical Union. He and Eugene V. Debs founded the Socialist Party. He opposed U.S. entry into World War I; in Chicago in 1918, he was tried and convicted under the Espionage Act, and sentenced to twenty years in prison; elected to Congress anyway, he was denied a seat in 1919-21 to to alleged disloyalty. In 1921, the U.S. Supreme Court reversed his conviction; the cases against him were withdrawn; he resumed his seat in Congress in 1923. Injured in a streetcar accident, and subsequently died, in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis., August 7, 1929 (age 69 years, 160 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of Ignatz Berger and Julia Berger; married, December 4, 1897, to Meta Schlicting.
  Cross-reference: William F. Kruse — Adolph Germer — J. Louis Engdahl — Irwin St. John Tucker
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Marxists Internet Archive
Eugene V. Debs Eugene Victor Debs (1855-1926) — also known as Eugene V. Debs — of Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind. Born in Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind., November 5, 1855. Socialist. Locomotive fireman on the Terre Haute and Indianapolis Railroad; secretary-treasurer of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen in 1880-93; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1885; founder in 1893 and president (1893-97) of the American Railway Union; arrested during a strike in 1894 and charged with conspiracy to commit murder; the charges were dropped, but he was jailed for six months for contempt of court; became a Socialist while incarcerated; candidate for President of the United States, 1900 (Social Democratic), 1904 (Socialist), 1908 (Socialist), 1912 (Socialist), 1920 (Socialist); in 1905, was a founder of the Industrial Workers of the World ("Wobblies"), which hoped to organize all workers in "One Big Union"; convicted under the Sedition and Espionage Act for an anti-war speech he made in 1918, and sentenced to ten years in federal prison; released in 1921. Member, Knights of Pythias; American Civil Liberties Union. Died in Lindlahr Sanitarium, Elmhurst, DuPage County, Ill., October 20, 1926 (age 70 years, 349 days). Interment at Highland Lawn Cemetery, Terre Haute, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Daniel Debs and Marguerite (Betterich) Debs; married, June 9, 1885, to Katherine 'Kate' Metzel (step-sister-in-law of Bertha D. Baur (1870-1967)).
  Cross-reference: Victor L. Berger — William A. Cunnea
  See also NNDB dossier
  Books about Eugene V. Debs: James Chace, 1912 : Wilson, Roosevelt, Taft and Debs : The Election that Changed the Country — Charles W. Carey, Jr., Eugene V. Debs : Outspoken Labor Leader and Socialist (for young readers)
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, September 1908
  William Bross Lloyd (1875-1946) — also known as William B. Lloyd; "The Millionaire Socialist" — of Winnetka, Cook County, Ill. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., February 27, 1875. Socialist. Candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1918; arrested in downtown Chicago, 1918, for refusing to remove a red flag from his limo; co-founder of Communist Labor Party, 1919; indicted for sedition, 1920; represented at trial by Clarence Darrow; convicted, sentenced to 1-5 years in prison; his sentence was commuted in 1922. Died, of cancer, in the Ritz-Carlton Hotel, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., June 30, 1946 (age 71 years, 123 days). Cremated; ashes scattered in North Atlantic Ocean.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Demarest Lloyd (social reformer, author) and Jessie (Bross) Lloyd; married to Lola Maverick (divorced 1916) and Madge Bird; grandson of William Bross (1825?-?).
  Rose Pastor Stokes — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Communist. Indicted in 1918 for sedition over a speech she made in Kansas City, and released on bail; arrested in Stamford, Conn., in September, 1921, to prevent her from giving a speech there; candidate for borough president of Manhattan, New York, 1921. Female. Burial location unknown.
  Roger Culver Tredwell (1885-1961) — also known as Roger C. Tredwell — of Bloomington, Monroe County, Ind.; Washington, D.C.; Ridgefield, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., January 12, 1885. U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul General in Yokohama, 1910-11; U.S. Deputy Consul General in London, 1911; U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul in Burslem, 1911-12; Dresden, 1912; U.S. Consul in Bristol, 1913-14; Amsterdam, 1914; Naples, 1914; Leghorn, 1914-15; Turin, 1915-16; Rome, 1916-17; while working as American consul, he was arrested and imprisoned by the Russian Bolshevik authorities in Tashkent, 1918-19; U.S. Consul General in Hong Kong, 1925-29; Stockholm, as of 1932. Died in Ridgefield, Fairfield County, Conn., July 12, 1961 (age 76 years, 181 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Alanson Tredwell and Frances Vail (Culver) Tredwell; married to Winifred van Shaick Reed (died 1921).
  See also Wikipedia article
  William F. Kruse (1894-1952) — also known as Bill Kruse — of Illinois. Born in Hoboken, Hudson County, N.J., 1894. Bookkeeper; indicted in Chicago, 1918, along with former U.S. Rep. Victor L. Berger, and three others, for making speeches that encouraged disloyalty and obstructed military recruitment; tried and convicted; sentenced to twenty years in prison; the conviction was later overturned; Socialist candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois 6th District, 1918, 1920; delegate to Socialist National Convention from Illinois, 1920; Socialist candidate for secretary of state of Illinois, 1921; Workers candidate for Governor of Illinois, 1928. German and Danish ancestry. Died in 1952 (age about 58 years). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  J. Louis Engdahl (1884-1932) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn., November 11, 1884. Writer and editor for Socialist and Communist newspapers; indicted in Chicago, 1918, along with former U.S. Rep. Victor L. Berger, and three others, for making speeches that encouraged disloyalty and obstructed military recruitment; tried and convicted; sentenced to twenty years in prison; the conviction was later overturned; Socialist candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois 7th District, 1918; delegate to Socialist National Convention from Illinois, 1920; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1924 (Workers), 1926 (Workers Communist); Communist candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1930; Communist candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 7th District, 1931. Swedish ancestry. Died, of pneumonia, in Moscow, Russia, November 21, 1932 (age 48 years, 10 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Irwin St. John Tucker — of Illinois. Socialist. Lecturer; indicted in Chicago, 1918, along with former U.S. Rep. Victor L. Berger, and three others, for making speeches that encouraged disloyalty and obstructed military recruitment; tried and convicted; sentenced to twenty years in prison; the conviction was later overturned; candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois 10th District, 1918; delegate to Socialist National Convention from Illinois, 1920. Burial location unknown.
  Adolph Germer (1881-1966) — of Belleville, St. Clair County, Ill.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Wehlau, East Prussia (now Znamensk, Kaliningrad Oblast), January 15, 1881. Socialist. Miner; union official in various capacities for the United Mine Workers of America, 1906-16; member of Socialist National Committee from Illinois, 1911; candidate for Illinois state house of representatives, 1912; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1914; National Executive Secretary, Socialist Party of America, 1916-19; indicted in Chicago, 1918, along with former U.S. Rep. Victor L. Berger, and three others, for making speeches that encouraged disloyalty and obstructed military recruitment; tried and convicted; sentenced to twenty years in prison; the conviction was later overturned; candidate for New York state assembly from New York County 16th District, 1921. Member, United Mine Workers. Died in Rockford, Winnebago County, Ill., May, 1966 (age 85 years, 0 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Emil M. Herman (1879-1928) — of Seattle, King County, Wash.; Everett, Snohomish County, Wash. Born in Kamnitz, Bohemia (now Kamienice, Czechia), August 22, 1879. Socialist. Socialist candidate for Seattle city council, 1904; candidate for U.S. Representative from Washington, 1906 (at-large), 1908 (2nd District), 1909 (2nd District); State Secretary, Socialist Party of Washington, 1916-18; arrested in 1918, and convicted under the Espionage Act; sentenced to ten years in prison; served three years and four months; candidate for Governor of Washington, 1924. German ancestry. Member, Industrial Workers of the World. Died October 10, 1928 (age 49 years, 49 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Ruby Herman (1885?-?).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Maurice Sugar (1891-1974) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Brimley, Chippewa County, Mich., August 8, 1891. Lawyer; Socialist candidate for circuit judge in Michigan 3rd Circuit, 1917; Socialist candidate for justice of Michigan state supreme court, 1917; candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan 13th District, 1918 (Socialist), 1936 (Farmer-Labor); convicted in 1918 for resisting the draft, sentenced to a year in prison, and disbarred; readmitted to the Bar in 1923; pardoned in 1933; general counsel to the United Automobile Workers, 1937-46; Progressive candidate for Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1948. Jewish and Lithuanian ancestry. Member, National Lawyers Guild. Died in Cheboygan County, Mich., February 15, 1974 (age 82 years, 191 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Kalman Sugar and Mary Sugar; married 1914 to Jane Mayer Sugar (1878?-?).
  See also Wikipedia article
Elmer T. Allison Elmer T. Allison (1883-1982) — of Seattle, King County, Wash.; Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Bethel, Fairfield County, Conn.; Washington. Born in Houstonia, Pettis County, Mo., December 5, 1883. Communist. Sawmill worker; arrested in Cleveland, 1919, on charges of violating the state's criminal syndicalism law; Workers candidate for New York state senate 14th District, 1926; poet. Member, Industrial Workers of the World. Died in Olympia, Thurston County, Wash., July 18, 1982 (age 98 years, 225 days). Interment at Woodbine Cemetery, Puyallup, Wash.
  Relatives: Son of Nathaniel Allison and Mattie (Johnson) Allison; brother of Hortense Allison (who married Alfred Wagenknecht); married 1908 to Anna Theresa Swanson; married 1922 to Rose Rosen; uncle of Helen Allison Winter (1908-2001) (who married Carl Winter).
  Political family: Winter-Wagenknecht family.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Marxists Internet Archive
  Frederick J. Harwood — of Newark, Essex County, N.J.; New York. Socialist. State Secretary, New Jersey Socialist Party, 1919; when attempting to speak to a Socialist rally in Rahway, N.J., May 31, 1919, he was sprayed with a fire hose by Mayor David H. Trembley; charged with opposing and obstructing a police officer, and fined $50; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 24th District, 1938. Burial location unknown.
  James B. Furber (c.1868-1930) — of Rahway, Union County, N.J.; Linden, Union County, N.J. Born in Allegan, Allegan County, Mich., about 1868. Traveling salesman for National Cash Register Company; newspaper publisher; real estate developer; lawyer; mayor of Rahway, N.J., 1906, 1922-24; resigned 1906; charged with assault in connection with his participation in a Socialist rally in Rahway, N.J., May 31, 1919, which was ended by spraying the speaker and audience with a fire hose; Socialist candidate for U.S. Representative from New Jersey 5th District, 1920; Progressive candidate for Presidential Elector for New Jersey, 1924; elected (Democratic) mayor of Linden, N.J. 1930, but died before taking office. Suffered a paralytic stroke, while addressing a meeting of the Parent Democratic Club, and died soon after in St. Elizabeth Hospital, Elizabeth, Union County, N.J., November 12, 1930 (age about 62 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Father of Helen Josephine Furber (niece by marriage of George McGillivray (1871?-1959)).
  David H. Trembley (b. 1858) — of Rahway, Union County, N.J. Born in New Jersey, 1858. Carriage painter; mayor of Rahway, N.J., 1918-22; on May 31, 1919, he prevented a Socialist orator, Frederick Harwood, from speaking, by spraying him and his audience with a fire hose; subsequently arrested and charged with assault and inciting to riot; retaliated by arresting Justice of the Peace Gustav Theimer, who had indicted him, and arraigned him on a charge of improper procedure. French Huguenot ancestry. Burial location unknown.
  Charlotte Anita Whitney (c.1868-1955) — also known as Anita Whitney — of California. Born about 1868. Communist. Social worker; in 1919, she gave a radical speech in Oakland, California; as a result, she was arrested, tried, and found guilty of violating the state's syndicalism law; pardoned by Governor C. C. Young.; candidate for U.S. Senator from California, 1928, 1940 (Communist). Female. Died in San Francisco, Calif., February 4, 1955 (age about 87 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of George E. Whitney (1838?-?); niece of Stephen Johnson Field.
  Political family: Whitney-Field-Brewer-Wells family of California.
  Frederic Thomas Woodman (1872-1949) — also known as Frederic T. Woodman — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Concord, Merrimack County, N.H., June 25, 1872. Republican. Lawyer; member of New Hampshire state house of representatives, 1901-03; mayor of Los Angeles, Calif., 1916-19; defeated, 1919; indicted on bribery charges, March 1919; tried and found not guilty; banker. Died March 25, 1949 (age 76 years, 273 days). Interment at Angelus-Rosedale Cemetery, Los Angeles, Calif.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
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Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
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