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Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble: 1950 to 1959

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in approximate chronological order

  George William Crockett, Jr. (1909-1997) — also known as George W. Crockett, Jr. — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla., August 10, 1909. Democrat. Recorder's court judge in Michigan, 1966-78; U.S. Representative from Michigan 13th District, 1980-91; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1984, 1988; arrested during an anti-apartheid protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Kappa Alpha Psi; National Lawyers Guild. Served four months in federal prison for contempt of court in 1950, following his defense of a Communist leader on trial in New York for advocating the overthrow of the government. Among the founders of the nation's first interracial law firm. Ill with bone cancer in 1997, he suffered a stroke and died five days later, in Washington Home and Hospice, Washington, D.C., September 7, 1997 (age 88 years, 28 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Father of George W. Crockett III (1926?-).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Charles Fitch Hemans (1896-1971) — also known as Charles F. Hemans; "Baron of the Bathroom"; "Knight of the Doublecross" — of Eaton Rapids, Eaton County, Mich.; Howell, Livingston County, Mich.; Lansing, Ingham County, Mich. Born in Mason, Ingham County, Mich., April 12, 1896. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1924; candidate in primary for Michigan state house of representatives from Wayne County 1st District, 1926, 1928; member of University of Michigan board of regents, 1934-41; defeated, 1931, 1941; candidate in primary for U.S. Representative from Michigan 15th District, 1934; candidate for circuit judge in Michigan 30th Circuit, 1935; candidate in primary for Lieutenant Governor of Michigan, 1936. Implicated in the Michigan legislative bribery scandal in 1944; granted immunity from prosecution and testified that he had bribed many legislators in his hotel bathroom; later, another bribery case against legislators fell apart when he refused to testify and fled to Washington; arrested by FBI agents and arraigned on a federal fugitive witness charge; tried and convicted, and sentenced to four years in prison; pleaded guilty to bribery in 1950 and sentenced to five years probation and a $1,000 fine. Died January 29, 1971 (age 74 years, 292 days). Interment at Maple Grove Cemetery, Mason, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Lawton Thomas Hemans (1864-1916) and Minnie P. Hemans.
  Cross-reference: Carl F. DeLano — Gilbert H. Isbister — Robert B. McLaughlin — Charles S. Blondy — James B. Stanley — William C. Stenson — Earl W. McEwen, Sr. — Byron L. Ballard — Ernest G. Nagel — Charles C. Diggs, Sr. — James A. Burns — Earl C. Gallagher — Edward J. Walsh — Walter N. Stockfish — Adam Sumeracki — Joseph J. Kowalski
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Emanuel Haldeman-Julius (1889-1951) — also known as E. Haldeman-Julius; Emanuel Julius — of Girard, Crawford County, Kan. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., July 30, 1889. Socialist. Author; editor of the Socialist newspaper Appeal to Reason; founder of Haldeman-Julius Publications, publisher of many five-cent paperback books, called "Little Blue Books"; there were more than 6,000 titles, mostly literature, biography, self-improvement, and other educational topics, to make them widely accessible to the public; all together, from 1919 to 1951, over 500 million copies were printed and sold; candidate for U.S. Senator from Kansas, 1932; indicted by a federal grand jury in March, 1950 for income tax evasion; tried and convicted in April, 1951; sentenced to six months in prison, and fined $12,500; released pending appeal. Jewish; later Agnostic. Drowned in his swimming pool, in Girard, Crawford County, Kan., July 31, 1951 (age 62 years, 1 days). Possibly suicide, but the coroner ruled his death to be accidental. Interment at Cedarville Cemetery, Cedarville, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of David Julius and Elizabeth (Zamost) Julius; married, June 1, 1916, to Anna Marcet Haldeman (1887-1941; author, editor, playwright; niece of Jane Addams; granddaughter of John Huy Addams (1822-1881)); married 1942 to Susan Haney.
  Political family: Addams-Haldeman family of Sinking Spring, Pennsylvania.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William W. Voisine (1897-1959) — also known as Wilfred William Voisine — of Ecorse, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Michigan, November 20, 1897. Steel executive; village president of Ecorse, Michigan, 1936-37; members of a steelworker terrorist group, the Black Legion, repeatedly attempted to kill him in 1936; Jesse Pettijohn and Lawrence Madden were later convicted of conspiracy to commit murder; mayor of Ecorse, Mich., 1948-49, 1954-57. French Canadian ancestry. Convicted in April, 1950, of falsely testifying to a Congressional committee in 1948 that he had received only the regular price for steel; sentenced to two years in federal prison. In October, 1956, a warrant was issued for his arrest, along with several members of the city council, for knowingly permitting illegal gambling in Ecorse, in return for bribes and gratuities; Gov. G. Mennen Williams initiated removal proceedings against the officials. Died in 1959 (age about 61 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Abel Voisine (1859-1930) and Eugenia Jennie (Blais) Voisine (1870-1909); married, August 1, 1918, to Helen Pearl O'Brien.
  John Stewart Service (1909-1999) — also known as John S. Service — Born in Chengdu, China, August 3, 1909. U.S. Consul in Wellington, as of 1947. One of several U.S. diplomats whose wartime reports from China detailed the weakness and corruption of Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalist government, and and accurately predicted the triumph of the Chinese Communists in the ensuing civil war. These reports were held against him as evidence of disloyalty, notably by Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy, who in 1950 called him "a known associate and collaborator with Communists." Under pressure from McCarthy, the State Department dismissed him in 1951; he was reinstated by a unanimous ruling of the U.S. Supreme Court in 1956. Died in Oakland, Alameda County, Calif., February 3, 1999 (age 89 years, 184 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1932 to Carolina Schulz.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Howard Melvin Fast (1914-2003) — also known as Howard Fast; "E. V. Cunningham"; "Walter Ericson" — of Teaneck, Bergen County, N.J. Born in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., November 11, 1914. Communist. Novelist; in 1950, suspected of sedition, he was called before the House Un-American Activities Committee, where he refused to name fellow members of the Communist Party; convicted of contempt of Congress and sentenced to three months in prison; awarded the Stalin Peace Prize in 1953; American Labor candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 23rd District, 1952. Jewish. Died in Old Greenwich, Greenwich, Fairfield County, Conn., March 12, 2003 (age 88 years, 121 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Barney Fast and Ida (Miller) Fast; married, June 6, 1937, to Bette Cohen; married 1999 to Mercedes O'Connor.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Parnell Thomas (1895-1970) — also known as J. Parnell Thomas — of Allendale, Bergen County, N.J. Born in Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J., January 16, 1895. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; mayor of Allendale, N.J., 1926-30; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Bergen County, 1935-36; U.S. Representative from New Jersey 7th District, 1937-50; defeated, 1954. Pleaded no contest to payroll padding; resigned from Congress and sentenced to prison, 1950. Died in St. Petersburg, Pinellas County, Fla., November 19, 1970 (age 75 years, 307 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Elm Grove Cemetery, Mystic, Stonington, Conn.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Walter Ellsworth Brehm (1892-1971) — also known as Walter E. Brehm — of Logan, Hocking County, Ohio; Millersport, Fairfield County, Ohio. Born in Somerset, Perry County, Ohio, May 25, 1892. Republican. Dentist; member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1938-42; U.S. Representative from Ohio 11th District, 1943-53. Member, Grange; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Odd Fellows; Eagles; Elks; Kiwanis; Psi Omega. Convicted in 1951 of illegally accepting campaign contributions from a clerk in his office, and fined $5,000. Died in Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio, August 24, 1971 (age 79 years, 91 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Gilbert M. Brehm and Lucy E. (Lenhart) Brehm; married, September 20, 1923, to Lucille Fountain.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Gus Hall (1910-2000) — also known as Arvo Kustaa Halberg — of Youngstown, Mahoning County, Ohio; Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Virginia, St. Louis County, Minn., October 8, 1910. Communist. Steelworker; union organizer and one of the leaders of the steelworkers' strike in 1937; candidate for mayor of Youngstown, Ohio, 1937; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; indicted in 1948, and convicted in 1949, under the Smith Act, of conspiring to teach the violent overthrow of the U.S. government; fled to Mexico; arrested in 1951 and sent back; spent eight years in prison; candidate for President of the United States, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1984. Finnish ancestry. Died, of complications from diabetes, in Lenox Hill Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 13, 2000 (age 90 years, 5 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park, Ill.
  Relatives: Married 1935 to Elizabeth Turner.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Theophilus Eugene Connor (1897-1973) — also known as Bull Connor — of Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala. Born in Selma, Dallas County, Ala., July 11, 1897. Democrat. Sports reporter on Birmingham radio; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1935-37; Birmingham Commissioner of Public Safety, 1936-52, 1956-63; candidate in primary for Governor of Alabama, 1940, 1954; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alabama, 1948, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1968; arrested on December 26, 1951, on being found having a tryst in a hotel room with his secretary, Christina Brown; convicted of adultery, fined and sentenced to jail, but the conviction was overturned in 1952; member of Democratic National Committee from Alabama, 1960-63; an ardent white supremacist; his use of police dogs and fire hoses against civil rights demonstrators in 1962-63 provoked national outrage; candidate for mayor of Birmingham, Ala., 1963. Died in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala., March 10, 1973 (age 75 years, 242 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Birmingham, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Hugh King Connor Connor and Molly (Godwin) Connor; married 1920 to Beara Levens.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William T. Michaelson — of Cliffside Park, Bergen County, N.J. Mayor of Cliffside Park, N.J., 1950-51; indicted in 1951, and again in 1953, on charges of failure to enforce gambling laws; the charges were dropped in 1955. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
Corliss Lamont Corliss Lamont (1902-1995) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Englewood, Bergen County, N.J., March 28, 1902. Socialist. Author; lecturer; arrested on June 27, 1934, while picketing in support of a labor union at a furniture plant in Jersey City, N.J.; president, National Council of American-Soviet Friendship; this organization and its leaders were investigated for subversion by the U.S. House Committee on Un-American Activities; charged in 1946 with contempt of Congress for his refusal to provide records demanded by the committee; in 1951, the U.S. State Department denied a passport to him, based on his membership in what were deemed "Communist-front organizations"; on August 17, 1954, the U.S. Senate cited him with contempt of Congress for refusing to testify before Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy's subcommittee; subsequently indicted; pleaded not guilty; the indictment was dismissed in 1955; the Court of Appeals upheld the dismissal in 1956; candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 1952 (American Labor), 1958 (Independent Socialist). Member, American Civil Liberties Union; NAACP; Phi Beta Kappa; American Academy of Political and Social Science. Died, of heart failure, in Ossining, Westchester County, N.Y., April 26, 1995 (age 93 years, 29 days). Interment at Brookside Cemetery, Englewood, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas William Lamont (1870-1948) and Florence Haskell (Corliss) Lamont (died 1952); married, June 8, 1928, to Margaret Hayes Irish (c.1905-1977); married 1962 to Helen Lamb (died 1975); married 1986 to Beth Keehner; granduncle of Ned Lamont (1966?-).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Militant, November 3, 1958
  Joseph P. Luna — of Lodi, Bergen County, N.J. Democrat. Mayor of Lodi, N.J., 1944-51; defeated, 1951; indicted in 1951 on charges of failure to enforce gambling laws; the charges were dropped in 1955; recalled from office as borough councilman in 1960. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Charles A. Heft — of Fort Lee, Bergen County, N.J. Republican. Mayor of Fort Lee, N.J., 1940-51; defeated, 1951; indicted in 1951, along with three other city officials, on charges of failing to enforce gambling laws; the charges were dropped in 1955. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  William Albertson (1910-1972) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Odessa, Russia (now Ukraine), May 7, 1910. Communist. Candidate for New York state senate 16th District, 1932; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 17th District, 1934; secretary-treasurer, Local 16, Hotel and Restaurant Workers Union. Indicted, along with other Communist leaders, by a federal grand jury in August, 1951; tried, in Pittsburgh, starting in November 1952, and convicted in August, 1953, under the Smith Act, of conspiring to advocate the violent overthrow of the U.S. government; sentenced to five years in prison; the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the convictions in 1956. Expelled from the Communist Party in 1964 over claims that he served as an undercover police agent; in 1976, it was revealed that the charge was founded on a phony letter planted by the F.B.I. Died, in an automobile accident, February 19, 1972 (age 61 years, 288 days). Burial location unknown.
  William Marshall Boyle, Jr. (1903-1961) — also known as William M. Boyle, Jr.; Bill Boyle — of Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo. Born in Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, Kan., February 2, 1903. Democrat. Lawyer; Director, Kansas City Police, 1939; Chairman of Democratic National Committee, 1949-51; investigated in 1951 by the Senate Investigating Committee over his acceptance of fees from the American Lithifold Corporation of St. Louis, in return for using his influence as Democratic national chair to obtain loans for the company from the U.S. Reconstruction Finance Corporation; claimed to have been vindicated, but ultimately resigned under fire. Irish ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., August 30, 1961 (age 58 years, 209 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Clara Boyle; married to Genevieve Hayde.
  Joseph Edward Casey (1898-1980) — also known as Joseph E. Casey — of Clinton, Worcester County, Mass. Born in Clinton, Worcester County, Mass., December 27, 1898. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1924 (alternate), 1932, 1940, 1944, 1948; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 3rd District, 1935-43; defeated, 1926, 1928; candidate for U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1942. Catholic. Member, Knights of Columbus; Elks; Eagles; American Legion. In 1951-52, a U.S. Senate committee investigated transactions in which a group he led made enormous profits from the purchase and re-sale of surplus U.S. tanker ships following World War II; since federal law required that sales be made only to U.S. citizens, his group allegedly set up several dummy corporations purportedly under American ccontrol, and faked financial statements for them, to buy the tankers on behalf of shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis. A federal indictment against him, over these actions, was unsealed in February 1954, but the charges were dismissed in September. Onassis, also indicted, pleaded guilty and paid a fine. Died September 1, 1980 (age 81 years, 249 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of John Edward Casey and Winifred M. (Carey) Casey; married to Constance Dudley.
  Cross-reference: Julius C. Holmes — Edward R. Stettinius, Jr.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
Herman Methfessel Herman Methfessel (1900-1963) — of Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y.; Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 23, 1900. Democrat. Newspaper reporter; lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Richmond County 2nd District, 1935-38; Richmond County District Attorney, 1948-51. In September 1951, the New York State Crime Commission, investigating rackets on the Staten Island waterfront, heard testimony from Mrs. Anna Wentworth that she had seen District Attorney Methfessel in a gambling house, which implied that he was protecting vice; in response, he ordered her arrest and charged her with perjury. At the request of the Crime Commission, citing abuse of power, Gov. Thomas E. Dewey superseded him from all cases related to the investigation; in the meantime, he was defeated for re-election. In 1952, he and a subordinate were charged with official misconduct, but found not guilty. Injured in a one-car accident, and died the next day, in North Shore Hospital, Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., July 7, 1963 (age 62 years, 226 days). Burial location unknown.
  Cross-reference: Ellsworth B. Buck
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
  Joseph E. Venuti (born c.1915) — of Tuckahoe, Westchester County, N.Y. Born about 1915. Democrat. Plumber; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 27th District, 1944. Italian ancestry. He and two others were indicted in July 1951, and charged with conspiring to violate gambling laws; the trial was delayed while he was hospitalized with a stomach ailment; arrested in his hospital bed and transferred to jail; the other two co-defendants were tried separately and convicted; later, the convictions were reversed, and the indictment of Mr. Venuti was dismissed. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Venuti and Pauline Venuti.
  Cross-reference: Milton A. Gibbons
  Irving Charles Velson (1913-1976) — also known as Irving C. Velson; Irving Charles Shavelson; Charles Wilson; "Nick"; "Shavey" — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; San Francisco, Calif. Born in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., June 3, 1913. Machinist; boilermaker; shipfitter; president, Local 13, Shipbuilders Union; American Labor candidate for New York state senate 11th District, 1938; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; in 1951 and 1953, he was brought to testify before Congressional committees about his Communist and Soviet activities, including efforts to infiltrate the U.S. military with Soviet spies; he repeatedly refused to answer questions, invoking his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination; as a result, he was "barred for life" by the Shipbuilders' union; later, served as international representative for the (West Coast) International Longshoreman's and Warehousemen's Union. Venona Project documents (decrypted Soviet messages from the World War II era), released in 1995, show that he was an agent for Soviet military intelligence under the code name "Nick". Died in San Francisco, Calif., February 18, 1976 (age 62 years, 260 days). Cremated; ashes scattered in San Francisco Bay.
  Relatives: Son of Clara Lemlich Shavelson and Joseph 'Joe' Shavelson (1889-1951); married, January 26, 1937, to Ruth Young Velson (1916-?).
  Political family: Velson-Shavelson family of Brooklyn, New York.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Julius C. Holmes Julius Cecil Holmes (1899-1968) — also known as Julius C. Holmes — of Lawrence, Douglas County, Kan. Born in Pleasanton, Linn County, Kan., April 24, 1899. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Foreign Service officer; U.S. Vice Consul in Marseille, as of 1926; Smyrna, as of 1927-29; Tirana, 1930; general in the U.S. Army during World War II; executive officer, U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, 1942; assistant U.S. Secretary of State, 1944-45; U.S. Consul General in Hong Kong, 1959-61; U.S. Ambassador to Iran, 1961-65. In 1951-52, a U.S. Senate committee investigated how a group, including Holmes as well as former U.S. Rep. Joseph E. Casey and former Secretary of State Edward R. Stettinius, Jr., made large profits from the purchase and re-sale of surplus U.S. tanker ships following World War II. Under federal law, ships could be sold only to U.S citizens, so the group allegedly set up several dummy corporations purportedly under American control, and faked financial statements for them, to buy the tankers on behalf of Greek-Argentine shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis. A federal indictment against Holmes was ultimately dropped. Onassis, also indicted, pleaded guilty and paid a fine. Died July 16, 1968 (age 69 years, 83 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Louella Jane (Trussell) Holmes (1867-1956) and James Reuben Holmes (1868-1946); married to Henrietta Allen (1900-1972).
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: New York Times, February 24, 1954
  Edward Reilly Stettinius, Jr. (1900-1949) — also known as Edward R. Stettinius, Jr. — Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., October 22, 1900. U.S. Secretary of State, 1944-45; U.S. Representative to United Nations, 1945-46. In 1951-52, a U.S. Senate committee investigated transactions in which a group, including Stettinus as well as former U.S. Rep. Joseph E. Casey and diplomat Julius C. Holmes, made large profits from the purchase and re-sale of surplus U.S. tanker ships following World War II. Since federal law required that sales be made only to U.S. citizens, the group allegedly set up dummy corporations purportedly under American control, and faked financial statements for them, to buy the tankers on behalf of Greek-Argentine shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis. Criminal indictments against Casey and Holmes were ultimately dismissed; Onassis pleaded guilty and paid a fine. Died in Greenwich, Fairfield County, Conn., October 31, 1949 (age 49 years, 9 days). Interment at Locust Valley Cemetery, Locust Valley, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Edward R. Stettinius and Judith (Carrington) Stettinius.
  Epitaph: "Blessed Are The Pure In Heart."
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Milton A. Gibbons (born c.1900) — of Tuckahoe, Westchester County, N.Y. Born about 1900. Democrat. Police officer; mayor of Tuckahoe, N.Y., 1949-65; defeated (Republican), 1965; he and two others, including Joseph Venuti, were indicted in July 1951, and charged with conspiring to violate gambling laws; tried and convicted; sentenced to three months in jail, but released on bail a week later, pending appeal; in January 1953, the appellate court unanimously reversed his conviction and dismissed the indictment.; in 1962, he started a petition drive for a Constitutional amendment to allow prayer in public schools. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Elisa Cuyar (c.1903-1961).
Israel Amter Israel Amter (1881-1954) — of Ohio; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Denver, Colo., March 26, 1881. Communist. Musician; Workers Communist candidate for U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1928; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1930 (23rd District), 1938 (at-large); candidate for Governor of New York, 1932, 1934, 1942; candidate for borough president of Manhattan, New York, 1933. Indicted in 1951 for conspiring to teach and advocate the violent overthrow of the government, but due to poor health, was never tried. Died, from Parkinson's disease, in Columbus Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 24, 1954 (age 73 years, 243 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1903 to Sadie Van Veen.
  Image source: Marxists Internet Archive
  William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (1868-1963) — also known as W. E. B. Du Bois — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Accra, Ghana. Born in Great Barrington, Berkshire County, Mass., February 23, 1868. College professor; sociologist; historian; civil rights leader; Pan-Africanist; one of the founders of the NAACP; received the Spingarn Medal in 1920; member of New York American Labor Party Executive Committee, 1949; American Labor candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 1950; in 1951, he and four other leaders of the Peace Information Center, which was alleged to be acting on behalf of the Soviet Union, were indicted for their failure to register as foreign agents; the case was dismissed in 1952, but his passport was withheld until 1958; awarded the Lenin Peace Prize in 1959. African ancestry. Member, NAACP. In 1895, he was the first African-American to receive a Ph.D. from Harvard University. Died in Accra, Ghana, August 27, 1963 (age 95 years, 185 days). Entombed at Du Bois Memorial Centre, Accra, Ghana.
  Relatives: Son of Alfred Du Bois and Mary Silvina (Burghardt) Du Bois; married, May 12, 1896, to Nina Gomer (1871-1950); married 1951 to Shirley Graham (1896-1977).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by W. E. B. Du Bois: The Souls of Black Folk
  George Frost Kennan (1904-2005) — also known as George F. Kennan — of Pennsylvania. Born in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis., February 16, 1904. Foreign Service officer; U.S. Vice Consul in Tallinn, as of 1929; U.S. Consul in Berlin, as of 1932; U.S. Ambassador to Soviet Union, 1952; Yugoslavia, 1961; the government of the Soviet Union declared him persona non grata on October 3, 1952; received the 1956 Pulitzer Prize in History for his book Russia Leaves the War; received the 1968 Pulitzer Prize in Biography for his Memoirs; received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1989. Member, Council on Foreign Relations. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., March 17, 2005 (age 101 years, 29 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery, Princeton, N.J.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about George Kenan: Walter Isaacson, The Wise Men : Six Friends and the World They Made — John Lewis Gaddis, George F. Kennan: An American Life
  Daniel W. West (b. 1909) — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn.; Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Algood, Putnam County, Tenn., September 5, 1909. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1960, 1964 (alternate); member of Michigan state house of representatives, 1963-65 (Wayne County 6th District 1963-64, 24th District 1965); defeated in primary, 1954 (Wayne County 6th District), 1956 (Wayne County 6th District), 1958 (Wayne County 6th District), 1960 (Wayne County 6th District), 1965 (24th District). Convicted of various crimes, including burglary, larceny, and forgery, in Minnesota, Iowa, and Washington, D.C., and was sentenced to prison in those places; came to Michigan and assumed the identity of a deceased New York attorney of the same name; indicted in late 1964 on state charges of voter registration fraud and federal charges of income tax fraud and forgery; in January 1965, his seat in the Michigan House was declared vacant. Burial location unknown.
Vincent Hallinan Vincent Hallinan (1896-1992) — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in San Francisco, Calif., December 16, 1896. Progressive. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; lawyer; innovator in courtroom tactics; defense attorney for longshoreman union leader Harry Bridges, who had been accused of being a Communist; jailed six months for contempt of court in 1952; candidate for President of the United States, 1952; indicted in 1953 on income tax evasion charges; convicted and sentenced to 18 months in prison. Irish ancestry. Died in San Francisco, Calif., October 2, 1992 (age 95 years, 291 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1932 to Vivian Moore (1910-1999).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: The Militant, December 8, 1958
  Clark E. Tucker (1897-1971) — of Kansas City, Wyandotte County, Kan. Born December 1, 1897. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; lawyer; mayor of Kansas City, Kan., 1947-55; indicted in 1952, along with two city commissioners, on charges related to city procurement of asphalt. Died December 18, 1971 (age 74 years, 17 days). Interment at Highland Park Cemetery, Kansas City, Kan.
  Albert Jason Lima (1907-1989) — also known as Albert J. Lima — of San Francisco, Calif.; Oakland, Alameda County, Calif. Born in Mendocino County, Calif., August 31, 1907. Communist. Candidate for U.S. Representative from California 1st District, 1940, 1942; candidate for Presidential Elector for California, 1972. Convicted in 1952 of conspiracy to overthrow the United States government; the verdict was overturned on appeal. Died, of cancer, in Oakland, Alameda County, Calif., June 3, 1989 (age 81 years, 276 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Helen Lima (1917-2005).
  Political family: Adams-Baldwin-Otis family of Boston, Massachusetts (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Lawrence J. Murray, Jr. (1910-2000) — of Haverstraw, Rockland County, N.Y.; Pearl River, Rockland County, N.Y.; Nyack, Rockland County, N.Y. Born in New York, June 20, 1910. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Rockland County, 1938-40; removed 1940; charged, in January 1940, with embezzling $49,102 from Miss May Dunnigan, his mentally incompetent law client (also sister-in-law to U.S. Postmaster General James A. Farley); the money was lost in gambling on horse races; tried, convicted on all counts, and hence automatically disbarred and removed from office; sentenced to five to ten years in prison; his sentence was commuted in 1942; arrested in 1952, along with other bookmakers, for illegally taking bets. Irish ancestry. Died March 15, 2000 (age 89 years, 269 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Lawrence J. Murray (born 1874) and Emma (Brennan) Murray.
Arthur H. Wicks Arthur H. Wicks (1887-1985) — also known as A. H. Wicks — of Kingston, Ulster County, N.Y.; Lake Katrine, Ulster County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 24, 1887. Republican. Worked in piano manufacturing business; employed in the engineering department of the New York City Board of Water Supply, and then in construction of subways; owner and operator of steam laundry in Kingston; director, Governor Clinton Hotel; member of New York state senate, 1927-56 (29th District 1927-44, 34th District 1945-56); delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1940 (alternate), 1944 (alternate), 1948, 1952 (Honorary Vice-President), 1956; resigned in November 1953 as Senate Majority Leader and acting Lieutenant Governor, while under threat of ouster over his Sing Sing prison visits to convicted extortionist and labor leader Joseph S. Fay. Member, Freemasons; Junior Order; Rotary. Died in Lake Katrine, Ulster County, N.Y., February 18, 1985 (age 97 years, 56 days). Burial location unknown.
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
  Ernest King Bramblett (1901-1966) — also known as Ernest K. Bramblett — of Pacific Grove, Monterey County, Calif. Born in Fresno, Fresno County, Calif., April 25, 1901. Republican. Insurance business; mayor of Pacific Grove, Calif., 1938-46; U.S. Representative from California, 1947-55 (11th District 1947-53, 13th District 1953-55). Protestant. Member, Phi Delta Kappa; Elks; Moose; Rotary; Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Knights Templar; Shriners. Investigated by a federal grand jury in Washington over payroll padding in his office; he had hired his wife, received kickbacks from employees who did no work, and made false statements to the House disbursing officer; indicted on 18 counts in June 1953; pleaded not guilty; tried in February 1954; convicted on seven counts; his conviction was stayed pending appeal, but ultimately upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court; fined $5,000, placed on one-year probation, and separately required to pay restitution. Died December 27, 1966 (age 65 years, 246 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of James Mitchell Bramblett and Bettie Frances (King) Bramblett; married, May 5, 1924, to Lois Candace Bowker.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Charles Wheeler Thayer (1910-1969) — also known as Charles W. Thayer — of Villanova, Delaware County, Pa.; Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Villanova, Delaware County, Pa., February 9, 1910. U.S. Vice Consul in Moscow, 1937, 1940; Berlin, 1937-38; Hamburg, 1939-40; Kabul, as of 1943; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War II; head of the State Department's international broadcasting division, including the "Voice of America", 1947-49; U.S. Consul General in Munich, 1952-53; in March 1953, when attacks on his loyalty by U.S. Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy inspired a State Department investigation into his diplomatic career, he resigned from the Foreign Service; writer. Died, during heart surgery, in Salzburg, Austria, August 27, 1969 (age 59 years, 199 days). Interment at Church of the Redeemer Cemetery, Bryn Mawr, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of George C. Thayer and Gertrude May (Wheeler) Thayer (c.1870-1964); brother of Avis Howard Thayer (1912-1981; who married Charles Eustis Bohlen); married, March 27, 1950, to Cynthia (Dunn) Cochrane (daughter of James Clement Dunn); uncle of Avis Thayer Bohlen (1940-).
  Political family: Bohlen-Eustis-Thayer family of Bryn Mawr and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edward C. Peirce (c.1895-1955) — of New Bedford, Bristol County, Mass. Born about 1895. Democrat. Member of Massachusetts state senate, 1930; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1944, 1952; mayor of New Bedford, Mass., 1952-53; convicted in 1953 on charges of conspiracy to protect gambling, and sentenced to four years in prison; served twenty months. Died, of cancer, in a nursing home at New Bedford, Bristol County, Mass., January 31, 1955 (age about 60 years). Burial location unknown.
  Anthony Dreier — of Nanticoke, Luzerne County, Pa. Mayor of Nanticoke, Pa., 1953; convicted in 1953 on charges of soliciting and accepting a bribe for a police appointment. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Joseph Raymond McCarthy (1908-1957) — also known as Joseph R. McCarthy; Joe McCarthy; "Tail-Gunner Joe" — of Appleton, Outagamie County, Wis. Born in Grand Chute, Outagamie County, Wis., November 14, 1908. Republican. Lawyer; circuit judge in Wisconsin 10th Circuit, 1940-46; served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, 1947-57; died in office 1957; delegate to Republican National Convention from Wisconsin, 1948; speaker, 1952. Catholic. Claimed in a 1950 speech that he had a list of 205 Communists employed in the U.S. State Department; went on to conduct hearings and investigations into alleged subersive activities and Communist influence on society; with his sensationalist tactics and disregard for fairness and due process, he dominated the American political scene for a period of time, now called the McCarthy Era; public opinion turned against him when he tried to investigate the Army; in December 1953, the Senate voted 67-22 to censure him for "contemptuous conduct" and abuse of select committee privilege. Died of a liver ailment at Bethesda Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., May 2, 1957 (age 48 years, 169 days). Interment at St. Mary's Cemetery, Appleton, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of Timothy McCarthy (1867-1946) and Bridget (Tierney) McCarthy (1870-1941); married, September 29, 1953, to Jean Fraser Kerr (1924-1979).
  Cross-reference: L. Brent Bozell — Norman Armour — Joseph C. Grew — Robert Woods Bliss — William Phillips — Albert Cohn — Corliss Lamont — Merwin K. Hart — Charles W. Thayer — John S. Service
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Joseph R. McCarthy: Richard H. Rovere, Senator Joe McCarthy — Arthur Herman, Joseph McCarthy : Reexamining the Life and Legacy of America's Most Hated Senator — Ellen Schrecker, The Age of McCarthyism — Thomas C. Reeves, The Life and Times of Joe McCarthy : A Biography
  Fiction about Joseph R. McCarthy: William F. Buckley, Jr., The Redhunter : a novel based on the life of Senator Joe McCarthy
  Elizabeth Gurley Flynn (1890-1964) — also known as "Rebel Girl" — of New York. Born in Concord, Merrimack County, N.H., August 7, 1890. Communist. Speaker and organizer for the Industrial Workers of the World ("Wobblies") in 1906-16; one of the founders of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), which later expelled her for being a Communist; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1942 (Communist, at-large), 1954 (Peoples' Rights, 24th District); convicted under the anti-Communist Smith Act, and sentenced to three years in prison; released in 1957; became National Chair of the Communist Party U.S.A. in 1961. Female. Irish ancestry. Member, American Civil Liberties Union; Industrial Workers of the World. Died in Russia, September 5, 1964 (age 74 years, 29 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park, Ill.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Harold Giles Hoffman (1896-1954) — also known as Harold G. Hoffman — of South Amboy, Middlesex County, N.J. Born in South Amboy, Middlesex County, N.J., February 7, 1896. Republican. Colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I; real estate business; banker; newspaper columnist and radio commentator; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Middlesex County, 1923-24; mayor of South Amboy, N.J., 1925-27; U.S. Representative from New Jersey 3rd District, 1927-31; New Jersey Commissioner of Motor Vehicles, 1930-35; Governor of New Jersey, 1935-38; defeated in primary, 1940, 1946; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1936 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business); colonel in the U.S. Army during World War II. Methodist. Member, Junior Order; Patriotic Order Sons of America; American Legion; Freemasons; Elks; Eagles; Royal Arcanum. Suspended in 1954 as head of the New Jersey unemployment compensation system for an investigation of financial irregularities. Subsequently, when he died, his written confession of embezzlement schemes was disclosed. Died, of a heart attack, in his room at the Blake Hotel, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., June 4, 1954 (age 58 years, 117 days). Interment at Christ Church Cemetery, South Amboy, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Frank Hoffman and Ada Crawford (Thom) Hoffman; married, September 10, 1919, to Lillie Moss.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
Anne Braden Anne McCarty Braden (1924-2006) — also known as Anne Braden; Anne McCarty — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., July 28, 1924. Newspaper reporter; labor organizer; civil rights activist starting in the 1940s; in May 1954, to fight segregation, she and her husband bought a house in a white neighborhood on behalf of a Black family; this sparked furious and violent opposition and the bombing of the house; she and others were charged with sedition; her husband was the first to be convicted, but then, in 1956, all state sedition laws were struck down; Communist candidate for Presidential Elector for Kentucky, 1972. Female. Episcopalian. Died in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., March 6, 2006 (age 81 years, 221 days). Interment at Eminence Cemetery, Eminence, Ky.
  Relatives: Married 1948 to Carl Braden (1914-1975).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Kentucky Center for African-American Heritage
  Thomas W. Flatley (born c.1888) — of Erie, Erie County, Pa. Born about 1888. Democrat. Mayor of Erie, Pa., 1952-54; resigned 1954; arrested in October 1954 and charged with taking part in a gambling racket; admitted to receiving payments and pleaded guilty; sentenced to one to two years in jail, and fined $1,000. Burial location unknown.
  Arthur Asher Miller (1915-2005) — also known as Arthur Miller — of Roxbury, Litchfield County, Conn. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 17, 1915. Democrat. Playwright; author of such plays as "Death of a Salesman" and "The Crucible"; received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1949; because he was suspected of ties to Communist organizations, his passport was denied in 1954; compelled to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1956; he refused to name his political colleagues, and was found guilty of contempt of Congress in 1957; the conviction was overturned on appeal; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Connecticut, 1968. Agnostic. Jewish ancestry. Died in Roxbury, Litchfield County, Conn., February 10, 2005 (age 89 years, 116 days). Interment at Great Oak Cemetery, Roxbury, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Isidore Miller and Augusta (Barnett) Miller; brother of Joan Copeland (actress); married, August 5, 1940, to Mary Grace Slattery (divorced 1956); married, January 29, 1956, to Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962; actress; divorced 1961); married, February 17, 1962, to Inge Morath (1923-2002).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Roger Alfred Davis (1889-1967) — also known as Roger A. Davis — of Hartly, Kent County, Del. Born in Delaware, March 2, 1889. Grocer; member of Delaware state house of representatives from Kent County 4th District, 1931-32, 1953-54; arrested, in April 1954, by Maryland State Police, on U.S. Route 50, and charged with drunk and reckless driving, as well as disorderly conduct; jailed overnight, pleaded guilty, and fined. Died in Hartly, Kent County, Del., December 6, 1967 (age 78 years, 279 days). Interment at Odd Fellows Cemetery, Camden, Del.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Alfred Davis (1845-1928) and Sarah Ann (Jones) Davis (1850-1937); married 1918 to Hannah Boulden Kirk (1895-1971); father of Roger Elmer Davis; third cousin thrice removed of Daniel Rodney and Caleb Rodney (1767-1840).
  Political families: Rodney family of Delaware; Lawrence-Andrew-Rodney-Parrish family of Adel, Georgia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Hugh W. Cross (b. 1896) — of Jerseyville, Jersey County, Ill. Born in Jerseyville, Jersey County, Ill., August 24, 1896. Republican. Member of Illinois state house of representatives 38th District, 1933-40; Speaker of the Illinois State House of Representatives, 1939-40; Lieutenant Governor of Illinois, 1941-49; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1944, 1948; member, Interstate Commerce Commission, 1949-55; resigned under fire from the Interstate Commerce Commission in 1955, following a unanimous vote of the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations to open an inquiry into the propriety of his actions influencing the award of a Chicago transportation contract; the committee later reported that he had "made a mistake and acted indiscreetly". Member, American Legion; Freemasons; Shriners; Jesters; Elks; Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Delta Phi. Burial location unknown.
John T. McManus John T. McManus (1904-1961) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Montrose, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 25, 1904. Reporter and movie critic for the New York Times; movie and radio critic for Time magazine; entertainment editor for PM (newspaper); general manager, Weekly Guardian newspaper; president, Newspaper Guild of New York, 1943-47; international vice president of the American Newspaper Guild; member, New York CIO Council; member of New York American Labor Party Executive Committee, 1945; candidate for Governor of New York, 1950 (American Labor), 1954 (American Labor), 1958 (Independent Socialist); in 1956, called before a U.S. Senate subcommittee, he took the Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination in refusing to answer questions about the Communist Party. Died, of a heart attack, in Montrose, Westchester County, N.Y., November 22, 1961 (age 56 years, 362 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Edward J. McManus; married to Jane Bedell.
  Image source: The Militant, November 24, 1958
  Charles G. Johnson (1880-1957) — also known as Gus Johnson — of Sacramento, Sacramento County, Calif. Born October 12, 1880. Republican. California state treasurer, 1923-56; resigned 1956; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1932. Resigned under fire in 1956, while subject of an inquiry into over $100,000 in unpaid personal loans from banks with state-deposited funds; no charges were ever filed. Died, four days after suffering a stroke, at Sutter Hospital, Sacramento, Sacramento County, Calif., October 14, 1957 (age 77 years, 2 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Orville E. Hodge — of Illinois. Illinois state auditor of public accounts, 1953-56. Convicted of embezzling state funds; sentenced to prison. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  John August Britting (1898-1968) — also known as John A. Britting — of East Farmingdale, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in New Jersey, April 3, 1898. Republican. Deputy treasurer of Suffolk County, 1942-54; member of New York state assembly from Suffolk County 3rd District, 1955-56; called to testify in 1956 during an investigation of his handling of tax-foreclosed properties as deputy county treasurer (known as the "land grab" scandal), he took the Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination to refuse to answer questions; indicted on bribery and conspiracy charges for channeling properties to favored speculators and receiving part of the profits; tried in 1958 and convicted; sentenced to five to ten years in prison and fined $27,000; released pending appeal; also convicted in a related case in 1959; in 1960, his prison sentence was reduced to one to two years. German ancestry. Died in October, 1968 (age 70 years, 0 days). Interment at Sacred Heart Cemetery, Southampton, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Edna Burns (1907-1979).
  Cross-reference: Cadman H. Frederick
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Cadman H. Frederick (b. 1880) — of Babylon, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y. Born, in the British West Indies, May 22, 1880. Republican. Real estate developer; one of the founders of the Suffolk Title and Guarantee Company, 1925; banker; mayor of Babylon, N.Y., 1937-38. Resigned in 1956 as president and director of the Suffolk County Federal Savings and Loan Association, in the midst of an investigation of the sale of tax-foreclosed properties by Suffolk County. He and others shared profits on the sale of these properties with Deputy County Treasurer John A. Britting. Burial location unknown.
  Terry Doyle Schrunk (b. 1913) — also known as Terry D. Schrunk — of Portland, Multnomah County, Ore. Born in Stayton, Marion County, Ore., March 10, 1913. Democrat. Fire fighter; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; Multnomah County Sheriff, 1949-56; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Oregon, 1952; mayor of Portland, Ore., 1957-72; indicted in March, 1957 on bribery and perjury charges; tried and found not guilty; another indictment, for conspiracy to obtain wiretaps and other related charges, was dismissed in September, 1957. Presbyterian. Member, Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion; Purple Heart; Elks; Eagles; Freemasons. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of James Schrunk and Pearl Margaret (Doyle) Schrunk; married, May 17, 1936, to Virginia Dorothy Price.
  Anthony Franciosa (1928-2006) — also known as Tony Franciosa; Anthony George Papaleo — of Brentwood, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 25, 1928. Democrat. Actor; hit and kicked a press photographer at the Los Angeles Civic Center on April 19, 1957; arrested for assault, pleaded guilty, served to ten days in jail, and fined $250; honored guest, Democratic National Convention, 1960. Italian ancestry. Suffered a stroke, and died a few days later, in UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., January 19, 2006 (age 77 years, 86 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Married 1952 to Beatrice Bakalyar; married, May 4, 1957, to Shelley Winters (1920-2006); married, December 31, 1961, to Judith (Balaban) Kanter; married, November 29, 1970, to Rita Theil.
  See also NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Howard Melish (1910-1986) — also known as W. Howard Melish — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., May 11, 1910. Episcopal priest; vice-chair of New York American Labor Party, 1945-49; ousted in 1957 as rector of Holy Trinity Church in Brooklyn, over his allegedly pro-Communist activities as chairman of the National Council of Soviet-American Friendship. Episcopalian. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., June 15, 1986 (age 76 years, 35 days). Interment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Marguerite (McComas) Melish (1873-1941) and John Howard Melish (1874-1969); married to Mary Jane Dietz (1913-1999).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Llewelyn Sherman Adams (1899-1986) — also known as Sherman Adams; "The Abominable No Man"; "The Great Stone Face" — of Lincoln, Grafton County, N.H. Born in East Dover, Dover, Windham County, Vt., January 8, 1899. Republican. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War I; lumberman; member of New Hampshire state house of representatives, 1941-44; Speaker of the New Hampshire State House of Representatives, 1943-44; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Hampshire, 1944, 1952 (speaker); U.S. Representative from New Hampshire 2nd District, 1945-47; delegate to New Hampshire state constitutional convention from Lincoln, 1948; Governor of New Hampshire, 1949-53; defeated, 1946; assistant to President Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1953-58; forced to resign in 1958 following disclosure that he had accepted gifts from a Boston businessman seeking preferred treatment from federal agencies. Episcopalian. Member, Sons of the American Revolution; Freemasons; Shriners; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; American Legion; Forty and Eight; Grange; Elks; Society of Colonial Wars; Foresters. Died in Hanover, Grafton County, N.H., October 27, 1986 (age 87 years, 292 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Lincoln, N.H.
  Relatives: Son of Clyde A. Adams and Winnie Marian (Sherman) Adams; married, July 28, 1923, to Rachael Leona White.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Clennon Washington King, Jr. (c.1921-2000) — also known as Clennon King; "The Black Don Quixote" — of Miami, Miami-Dade County, Fla. Born about 1921. Minister; Independent Afro-American candidate for President of the United States, 1960; candidate for mayor of Miami, Fla., 1996. African ancestry. Attempted to enroll in the then-all-white University of Mississippi in 1958, and was sent to the state's insane asylum; attempted to join and integrate Jimmy Carter's all-white Baptist Church in Plains, Ga., on the eve of the 1976 presidential election. Jailed on numerous occasions for his flamboyant tactics. Died, of prostate cancer, in Miami, Miami-Dade County, Fla., February 12, 2000 (age about 79 years). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Albany, Ga.
  Bobby Seale (b. 1936) — also known as Robert George Seale — of Oakland, Alameda County, Calif. Born in Dallas, Dallas County, Tex., October 22, 1936. Joined U.S. Air Force in 1955; charged with insubordination and being AWOL, and dishonorably discharged; sheet metal worker; co-founder, with Huey Newton, of the Black Panther Party, 1966; one of eight defendants charged in 1969 with crossing state lines to incite a riot at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago; the judge ordered him bound and gagged during the trial, and sentenced him to four years in prison for contempt of court; Peace and Freedom candidate for California state assembly 17th District, 1968; in 1970, he was charged in New Haven, Conn., with ordering the murder of Alex Rackley, a Black Panther who had confessed to being a police informant; the jury was unable to reach a verdict, and the charges were eventually dropped; candidate for mayor of Oakland, Calif., 1973. African ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
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The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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