PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace: Outside U.S.

in chronological order

  Joseph Roffignac (1766-1846) — also known as Louis Philippe Joseph de Rouffignac — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in Angoulême, France, 1766. Fled France in 1789 to escape the guillotine, presumably over disloyalty to the revolutionary regime; mayor of New Orleans, La., 1820-28. French ancestry. Suffered a stroke, and dropped the gun he was holding, which accidentally discharged, shooting him in the head and killing him, in Périgueux, France, 1846 (age about 80 years). Burial location unknown.
  Richard Valentine Morris (1768-1815) — also known as Richard V. Morris — of Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Morrisania, Westchester County (now part of Bronx, Bronx County), N.Y., March 8, 1768. U.S. Navy Captain, starting in 1798; criticized by his superiors for his inaction as commander during an attempted blockade of Tripoli in 1803; he faced a Naval Court of Inquiry in 1804 and was dismissed from the Navy; member of New York state assembly from Westchester County, 1813-14. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 13, 1815 (age 47 years, 66 days). Interment at St. Anne's Episcopal Churchyard, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Lewis Morris (1726-1798) and Mary (Walton) Morris (1727-1794); married, January 24, 1797, to Anne Walton (1773-1858); nephew of Richard Morris (1730-1810) and Gouverneur Morris (1752-1816); grandnephew of Robert Hunter Morris; great-grandson of Lewis Morris (1671-1746); great-granduncle of Gouverneur Morris Carnochan (1865-1915); second great-granduncle of Gouverneur Morris Carnochan (1892-1943); first cousin of Lewis Richard Morris; first cousin once removed of Gouverneur Morris (1809-1894).
  Political family: Morris-Ingersoll family of New York and Connecticut (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Swan (1754-1830) — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.; Paris, France. Born in Scotland, 1754. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; twice wounded at the Battle of Bunker Hill; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1777-78; imprisoned for debt in Paris, from 1808 to about 1830. Died in Paris, France, July 31, 1830 (age about 76 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1776 to Hepzibah Clarke.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James Swan (built 1944, wrecked 1952) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Lorenzo de Zavala (1788-1836) — also known as Manuel Lorenzo Justiniano de Zavala y Sáenz — of Mérida, Yucatan; La Porte, Harris County, Tex. Born in Tecoh, Yucatan, October 3, 1788. Active in politics in Mexico, 1812-34; imprisoned in 1814-17 by Mexican authorities over his advocacy of democratic reforms; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Harrisburg, 1835; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Harrisburg, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; Vice President of the Texas Republic, 1836. Died, of pneumonia, November 15, 1836 (age 48 years, 43 days). Interment at de Zavala Family Cemetery, La Porte, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Anastasio de Zavala y Velázquez and Maria Bárbara Sáenz y Castro; married 1807 to Teresa Correa y Correa (died 1831); married, November 12, 1831, to Emily West.
  Zavala County, Tex. is named for him.
  Albert Lange (1801-1869) — of Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind. Born in Charlottenburg, Prussia (now part of Berlin, Germany), December 16, 1801. Republican. He belonged to a secret society which advocated a constitutional government for the German Empire; in 1824, the conspiracy was uncovered; he was convicted of treason and sentenced to fifteen years in in prison; pardoned in 1829, and left Germany for the United States; U.S. Consul in Amsterdam, 1849-50; Indiana state auditor, 1861-63; mayor of Terre Haute, Ind., 1863-67. Died in Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind., July 25, 1869 (age 67 years, 221 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Terre Haute, Ind.
  Lange Elementary School (now closed), in Terre Haute, Indiana, was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Stephen Fuller Austin (1793-1836) — also known as Stephen F. Austin; "Father of Texas" — Born in Wythe County, Va., November 3, 1793. Member of Missouri territorial legislature, 1814-19; delegate to Texas Convention of 1832 from District of San Felipe de Austin, 1832; took petition to Mexico City for the establishment of Texas as a separate Mexican state, 1832; charged with attempting revolution, and imprisoned until 1835; delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Austin, 1833; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of San Felipe de Austin, 1835; candidate for President of the Texas Republic, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1836; died in office 1836. Member, Freemasons. Died of pneumonia, in Brazoria County, Tex., December 27, 1836 (age 43 years, 54 days). Original interment at Peach Point Cemetery, Gulf Prairie, Tex.; reinterment in 1910 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Moses Austin (1761-1821) and Maria (Brown) Austin (1768-1824).
  Austin County, Tex. is named for him.
  The city of Austin, Texas, is named for him.  — Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, Texas, is named for him.  — Austin College, Sherman, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Handbook of Texas Online
  Books about Stephen F. Austin: Gregg Cantrell, Stephen F. Austin : Empresario of Texas
  Henry P. Scholte (1805-1868) — of Pella, Marion County, Iowa. Born in Amsterdam, Netherlands, September 25, 1805. Republican. Preacher; joined the dissenters from the national church of the Netherlands; tried in 1834 for teaching heresy, expelled from the church, fined, and imprisoned; helped organize a group which emigrated to Iowa in 1847; lawyer; postmaster; delegate to Republican National Convention from Iowa, 1860. Dutch ancestry. Died August 25, 1868 (age 62 years, 335 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Pella, Iowa.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lorenzo Brentano (1813-1891) — also known as Lorenz Peter Carl Brentano — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Mannheim, Germany, November 4, 1813. Republican. In Germany, he participated in the 1849 revolution; arrested and sentenced to life imprisonment; escaped to the United States; member of Illinois state house of representatives 61st District, 1863-65; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1864; Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1868; U.S. Consul in Dresden, 1872-76; U.S. Representative from Illinois 3rd District, 1877-79. German ancestry. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., September 18, 1891 (age 77 years, 318 days). Interment at Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Married to Caroline Brentano (1819-1893); father of Theodore Brentano (1854-1940).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Louis O'Sullivan (1813-1895) — also known as John L. O'Sullivan — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born, of American parents, in the North Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Gibraltar, November 15, 1813. Democrat. Member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1841-42; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1844; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Portugal, 1854; U.S. Minister to Portugal, 1854-58. Episcopalian; later Catholic. Cofounder and editor of The United States Magazine and Democratic Review, a journal that published the works of Emerson, Hawthorne and Whitman, as well as political essays on Jacksonian Democracy, 1837-46. Early advocate in 1840s for abolition of the death penalty. Invented the term "manifest destiny" to explain and justify the westward expansion of the United States. Took part in the failed expedition of Narcisco Lopez to take Cuba from Spanish rule; as a result, was charged in federal court in New York with violation of the Neutrality Act; tried and acquitted in March 1852. Died, of influenza and the effects of an earlier stroke, in a residential hotel in New York, New York County, N.Y., March 24, 1895 (age 81 years, 129 days). Interment at Moravian Cemetery, New Dorp, Staten Island, N.Y.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Charles James Faulkner (1806-1884) — also known as Charles J. Faulkner — of Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Va. (now W.Va.). Born in Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Va. (now W.Va.), July 6, 1806. Democrat. Member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1829-34, 1848-49; member of Virginia state senate, 1838-42; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1850; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1851-59 (10th District 1851-53, 8th District 1853-59); U.S. Minister to France, 1860; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to West Virginia state constitutional convention, 1872; U.S. Representative from West Virginia 2nd District, 1875-77. On his return from France in August 1861, was detained as a prisoner of state on charges of negotiating arms sales for the Confederacy while in Paris; released in December 1861 and negotiated his own exchange for Alfred Ely, a a Congressman from New York who had been taken prisoner by the Confederates at Bull Run. Died near Martinsburg, Berkeley County, W.Va., November 1, 1884 (age 78 years, 118 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Berkeley County, W.Va.
  Relatives: Father of Charles James Faulkner (1847-1929).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Luke Pryor Blackburn (1816-1887) — also known as Luke P. Blackburn — of Kentucky. Born in Woodford County, Ky., June 16, 1816. Physician; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1843; Governor of Kentucky, 1879-83. Baptist. In 1865, he was tried and acquitted in a Toronto court for violating Canadian neutrality, in connection with a Confederate scheme to spread yellow fever in Northern cities. Died in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., September 14, 1887 (age 71 years, 90 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Mitchell Blackburn (1787-1867) and Lavinia St. Clair (Bell) Blackburn (1794-1863); brother of Joseph Clay Stiles Blackburn; married, November 24, 1835, to Ella Boswell; married, November 17, 1857, to Julia Churchill; uncle of Corinne Blackburn (1869-1958; who married William Holt Gale); granduncle of Smith Alford Blackburn; great-granduncle of Charles Milton Blackburn; first cousin twice removed of Gabriel Slaughter; third cousin of Charles Rice Slaughter (1819-1862); third cousin once removed of Robert Pryor Henry, John Flournoy Henry and Gustavus Adolphus Henry.
  Political families: Blackburn-Slaughter-Buckner-Madison family of Kentucky; Pendleton-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Blackburn Correctional Complex (opened 1972), in Lexington, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Luke Pryor Blackburn: Nancy Disher Baird, Luke Pryor Blackburn : Physician, Governor, Reformer
  George Wythe Randolph (1818-1867) — also known as George W. Randolph — of Virginia. Born near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va., March 10, 1818. Lawyer; delegate to Virginia secession convention, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Confederate Secretary of War, 1862; after the collapse of the Confederacy, fled to Europe to avoid capture; pardoned in 1866. Episcopalian. Died of pulmonary pneumonia, near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va., April 3, 1867 (age 49 years, 24 days). Interment at Monticello Graveyard, Near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr. and Martha (Jefferson) Randolph; brother of Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and Virginia Jefferson Randolph (who married Nicholas Philip Trist); uncle of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge; grandson of Thomas Jefferson; granduncle of John Gardner Coolidge; great-grandson of Archibald Cary; second great-grandson of Richard Randolph; first cousin of Francis Wayles Eppes; first cousin once removed of Dabney Carr, John Wayles Eppes and Frederick Madison Roberts; first cousin twice removed of John Randolph of Roanoke; first cousin thrice removed of Richard Bland and Peyton Randolph (1721-1775); second cousin of Dabney Smith Carr; second cousin once removed of John Marshall, James Markham Marshall and Alexander Keith Marshall; second cousin twice removed of Theodorick Bland, Edmund Jenings Randolph and Beverley Randolph; third cousin of Thomas Marshall, John Jordan Crittenden, Thomas Turpin Crittenden, Robert Crittenden, James Keith Marshall and Carter Henry Harrison; third cousin once removed of Henry Lee, Charles Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee, Peyton Randolph (1779-1828), Henry St. George Tucker, Alexander Parker Crittenden, Thomas Leonidas Crittenden, Thomas Theodore Crittenden, John Augustine Marshall and Carter Henry Harrison II; third cousin twice removed of Thomas Theodore Crittenden, Jr., William Marshall Bullitt and Alexander Scott Bullitt; fourth cousin of Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell (1793-1862), Edmund Randolph and Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; fourth cousin once removed of Thomas Jones Hardeman, Bailey Hardeman, William Lewis Cabell, Fitzhugh Lee, George Craighead Cabell and William Henry Robertson.
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $100 notes in 1862-64.
  Albert Rhodes (b. 1840) — of Pennsylvania; Washington, D.C. Born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., 1840. U.S. Consul in Jerusalem, 1863-65; Rotterdam, as of 1866; Rouen, 1877-83; Elberfeld, 1883-85; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Netherlands, 1866; dismissed as Charge d'Affaires in February 1867, by Hugh Ewing, for suspected disloyalty. Burial location unknown.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  William Magear Tweed (1823-1878) — also known as William M. Tweed; William Marcy Tweed; "Boss Tweed" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 3, 1823. Democrat. Chairmaker; fire fighter; U.S. Representative from New York 5th District, 1853-55; member of New York state senate 4th District, 1868-73. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Odd Fellows; Freemasons. Convicted of embezzlement and sentenced to twelve years in prison; escaped; captured in Spain and brought back to New York. Died in prison, in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 12, 1878 (age 55 years, 9 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Tweed and Eliza (Magear) Tweed; married, September 18, 1844, to Mary Jane C. Skaden.
  Cross-reference: Charles O'Conor — Thomas Nast — George G. Barnard — Albert Cardozo
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Books about William M. Tweed: Seymour J. Mandelbaum, Boss Tweed's New York — Leo Hershkowitz, Tweed's New York : another look — Kenneth D. Ackerman, Boss Tweed: The Rise and Fall of the Corrupt Pol Who Conceived the Soul of Modern New York
  Robert Cumming Schenck (1809-1890) — also known as Robert C. Schenck — of Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio. Born in Franklin, Warren County, Ohio, October 4, 1809. Lawyer; member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1839-43; U.S. Representative from Ohio, 1843-51, 1863-71 (3rd District 1843-51, 1863-67, 5th District 1867-69, 3rd District 1869-71); U.S. Minister to Brazil, 1851-53; Great Britain, 1870-76; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. While U.S. minister to Great Britain in 1871, he promoted the sale of shares in the Emma Silver Mine Company, of which was a director; quietly sold his own shares before news about the mine's depletion caused their value to collapse. His diplomatic immunity enabled him to avoid facing fraud charges in a British court. Died in Washington, D.C., March 23, 1890 (age 80 years, 170 days). Interment at Woodland Cemetery, Dayton, Ohio.
  Cross-reference: John W. Chanler
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — U.S. State Dept career summary
Patrick F. Egan Patrick F. Egan (1841-1919) — of Lincoln, Lancaster County, Neb. Born in County Longford, Ireland, August 13, 1841. Republican. Irish home rule advocate; prosecuted in Dublin, 1880, for sedition; grain elevator business; delegate to Republican National Convention from Nebraska, 1888; U.S. Minister to Chile, 1889-93. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., September 30, 1919 (age 78 years, 48 days). Interment at St. Raymond's Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  Henry Reed Rathbone (1837-1911) — Born in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., July 1, 1837. Lawyer; major in the Union Army during the Civil War; on April 14, 1865, he was seated in the box at Ford's Theater with President Abraham Lincoln; when John Wilkes Booth shot the president, Rathbone attempted to apprehend Booth, and suffered knife wounds; subsequently his mental health deteriorated; U.S. Consul in Hanover, as of 1882-83. On December 23, 1883, he killed his wife, and stabbed himself in a suicide attempt; he was charged with murder, convicted, and found insane; he died more than 25 years later, in the Asylum for the Criminal Insane, Hildesheim, Germany, August 14, 1911 (age 74 years, 44 days). Original interment at Stadtfriedhof Engesohde, Hanover, Germany; reinterment 1952 to unknown location.
  Relatives: Step-son of Ira Harris (1802-1875); son of Jared Lewis Rathbone and Pauline (Pinney) Rathbone (1810-1894); brother of Jared Lawrence Rathbone; married, July 11, 1867, to Clara Hamilton Harris (1834-1883; daughter of Ira Harris (1802-1875)); father of Henry Riggs Rathbone (1870-1928); second cousin once removed of Daniel Burrows; second cousin thrice removed of Ezekiel Cornell; third cousin of Lorenzo Burrows; fourth cousin once removed of Ezra Cornell.
  Political families: Cornell family of New York; Pendleton family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Beckford Mackey — U.S. Consul in Rio Grande do Sul, as of 1884-85; San Jose, as of 1892; on April 14, 1885, in Rio Grande do Sol, Brazil, he shot and wounded a newspaper editor who was assaulting him in a theater; arrested and imprisoned by Brazilian authorities; tried in June, and found not guilty. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of J. T. Mackey.
  William Stanley Hollis (1866-1930) — also known as W. Stanley Hollis — of Massachusetts; Chevy Chase, Montgomery County, Md. Born in Chelsea, Suffolk County, Mass., April 4, 1866. U.S. Consul in Mozambique Island, as of 1894; Lourenco Marques, 1898-1909; Dundee, 1909-10; U.S. Consul General in Beirut, 1911-17; London, 1919-20; Lisbon, 1920-27. In September, 1894, in Mozambique, he shot and wounded a local resident who he thought was a burglar; arrested and tried by Portugese authorities, convicted of homicide, and sentenced to six months in prison. Died, following a stroke, in Chevy Chase, Montgomery County, Md., June 8, 1930 (age 64 years, 65 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Capt. George Fearing Hollis and Eliza A. (Simmons) Hollis; married 1898 to Lena Cogswell Hobbs; married 1918 to Alice Davidson.
  Albert Hiram Lennox (1842-1907) — also known as Albert H. Lennox; Albert Hiram Lenox — of Camden, Camden County, N.J. Born in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., December 22, 1842. Shipbroker; commission merchant; Vice-Consul for Haiti in Philadelphia, Pa., 1877-83; Consul for Greece in Philadelphia, Pa., 1881-91; Consul for Haiti in Philadelphia, Pa., 1883-91; in 1891, he and other officers of some mutual benefit associations were charged in Philadelphia with obtaining money under false pretenses; in 1894, he resisted eviction for non-payment of rent; he was no longer consul, but falsely claimd diplomatic immunity; the government of Haiti contradicted his claim, and a scandal resulted. Died in Camden, Camden County, N.J., July 4, 1907 (age 64 years, 194 days). Interment at Colestown Cemetery, Cherry Hill Township, Camden County, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Elizabeth Jane Lenox and Hiram Lenox (1818-1892); married to Emma Stoy (1846-1923).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Louis Stern (c.1856-1901) — of St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minn. Born in Germany, about 1856. Democrat. Naturalized U.S. citizen; newspaper reporter; U.S. Commercial Agent (Consul) in Bamberg, 1893-1901. Jewish. Arrested and fined in Kissingen, Germany, 1895, for insulting the Baron von Thuengen; also charged with misrepresenting his 15-year-old son as being twelve in order to get cheaper passage to Europe for him on a steamship; the U.S. Consul General in Berlin asserted that Mr. Stern was "very harshly and unjustly treated". Depressed over financial problems and perceived anti-Semitism, he began neglecting his work; he was recalled as commercial agent in 1901, but remained at Bamberg; his failure to return money he had collected on behalf of U.S. citizens led to a judgement against him for 2,000 marks, which he was unable to pay; he died by self-inflicted gunshot, in the public gardens at Bamberg, Germany, June 10, 1901 (age about 45 years). Burial location unknown.
  Charles Henry Meyer (1826-1898) — also known as Charles H. Meyer; Carl H. Meyer; Karl Heinrich Meyer — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Schleiz, Germany, March 15, 1826. Dry goods importer; banker; Consul for Germany in Philadelphia, Pa., 1872-98; silk ribbon manufacturer. German ancestry. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., August 14, 1898 (age 72 years, 152 days). During a lawsuit following his death, his successor as German Consul alleged that Mr. Meyer had defaulted with at least $11,000 of the consulate's funds; this was denied by the executors of his estate, and the outcome of the dispute is unknown. Interment at Woodlands Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Christoph Heinrich Meyer (1795-1856) and Marie (Felder) Meyer (1806-1881); married, April 16, 1857, to Sophie Karoline Wilhelmine Brossman (1829-1881).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Martin Reinberg (b. 1852) — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Tuckum, Russia (now Tukums, Latvia), June 20, 1852. Naturalized U.S. citizen; U.S. Vice Consul in Guayaquil, 1883-84; U.S. Vice Consul General in Guayaquil, 1884-1902; founded an export and banking company in Guayaquil, Martin Reinberg & Company; in 1901, the company became bankrupt, with debts over one million dollars; following an investigation, his arrest was ordered by Ecuadorian authorities, who suspected him of embezzlement or bank fraud; removed from his consular post. Jewish. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Mendel Reinberg (1825-1900) and Paulina (Eder) Reinberg (1830-1911); brother of David S. Reinberg (1857?-?) and Isaac A. Reinberg.
  Political family: Reinberg family of Cincinnati, Ohio.
  John Goodnow (born c.1858) — of Minnesota. Born about 1858. Republican. Minnesota's most prominent advocate of William McKinley for president in 1896; U.S. Consul General in Shanghai, 1897-1905; charges of malfeasance against him were made by Americans in China to the State Department in 1902, and to President Theodore Roosevelt in December 1904; two months later, his resignation was announced; became an advisor to the Chinese government in 1906. Burial location unknown.
  Hyman Costrell (b. 1890) — also known as Jack Robbins — of New Haven, New Haven County, Conn.; New York. Born in Kurenitz, Russia (now Belarus), October 19, 1890. Communist. Arrested in 1905 in Russia and jailed three months for demonstrating and distributing circulars against the Czarist government; naturalized U.S. citizen; plumber; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 8th District, 1934. Jewish. Burial location unknown.
  Frederic Duncan MacMaster — also known as Frederic MacMaster — Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; member of Theodore Roosevelt's "Rough Rider" regiment; U.S. Consul in Zanzibar, 1905-06; dismissed from his consular position in 1906 over multiple instances of misconduct, including the assault of police officers in a bar-room; en route to the U.S., he stopped in Nice, France, and obtained a bank loan by pretending to be U.S. Consul Harold S. Van Buren. Burial location unknown.
  Charles Miot — U.S. Consular Agent in SAINT Marc, 1897-1908; Dismissed from his consular position in 1908 by the U.S. State Department for allegedly aiding Haitian rebels. Burial location unknown.
  William Ellerton Alger (1856-1917) — also known as William E. Alger — Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., September 1, 1856. U.S. Consular Agent in Puerto Cortes, 1891-1902; U.S. Consul in Puerto Cortes, 1902-04; Tegucigalpa, 1904-09; Mazatlan, 1909-16; Fernie, 1917; Guatemala City, 1917, died in office 1917; in 1909, he was accused, in a petition signed by Americans in Puerto Cortez, of conflict of interest, due to his marriage to a Honduran woman, the sister of a provincial governor, owning lands and cattle due to his marriage, and raising children in Honduras; the State Department investigated these accusations. Died in Guatemala City, Guatemala, March 9, 1917 (age 60 years, 189 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Anne Langdon 'Annie' (Lodge) Alger (1816-1883) and William Rounseville Alger (1822-1905); married 1888 to Lucille Violantte DeLeon (1871-1959); married 1896 to Mucia Paz (1868-1944).
  William Bruce MacMaster, Jr. (1875-1912) — also known as William B. MacMaster, Jr. — of New York. Born, of American parents, in Colombia, June 28, 1875. Rancher; U.S. Vice Consul in Cartagena, 1904-08; U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul in Cartagena, 1908-12, died in office 1912; stabbed by two Colombians in the summer of 1909; pressed charges against his attackers, one of whom was an influential newspaper editor; arrested by Colombian authorities in June 1910 on charges that, years earlier, he shot a a Colombian citizen, in what he said was self-defense; initially acquitted, then found guilty, then exonerated by a higher court. While hunting alone, was shot multiple times and killed by an unknown assassin, near Cartagena, Colombia, August 11, 1912 (age 37 years, 44 days). Interment at Church and Convent of Santo Domingo, Cartagena, Colombia.
  Relatives: Son of William Bruce MacMaster (1838-1891).
  Washington G. Lithgow (1840-1925) — also known as Washington Lithgow — of Charlestown, Middlesex County (now part of Boston, Suffolk County), Mass.; Plainfield, Union County, N.J.; Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. Born, of American parents, in Puerto Plata, Santo Domingo (now Dominican Republic), July 4, 1840. Republican. U.S. Vice Consul in Puerto Plata, 1875-99; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1880; Consul-General for Dominican Republic in San Juan, P.R., 1899; in 1912, due to his alleged support for rebels, he was ordered expelled from the Dominican Republic; the U.S. State Department interceded in his behalf, and the order was revoked. Died in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic, December 8, 1925 (age 85 years, 157 days). Interment somewhere in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic.
  Relatives: Married, July 17, 1863, to Ellen Prentiss Peirce; grandfather of Arthur Washington Lithgow (1915-2004; actor and director); great-grandfather of John Arthur Lithgow (born 1945; American actor in theater, television, and movies).
  James Mark Sullivan (1873-1933) — also known as James M. Sullivan — of New York. Born in Ireland, 1873. U.S. Minister to Dominican Republic, 1913-15. Participated in the 1916 Easter Uprising in Ireland; arrested by the British authorities, but not executed due to his American diplomatic passport. Died in 1933 (age about 60 years). Interment at Glasnevin Cemetery, Dublin, Ireland.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Olney Arnold (1861-1916) — of Providence, Providence County, R.I. Born in Cumberland, Providence County, R.I., September 8, 1861. Democrat. Treasurer and manager Rogers Screw Company; president, Angell Land Company; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Rhode Island, 1888; member of Rhode Island state house of representatives, 1908; candidate for Governor of Rhode Island, 1908, 1909; U.S. Diplomatic Agent to Egypt, 1913-16, died in office 1916; U.S. Consul General in Cairo, 1914-16, died in office 1916; under investigation in 1916 on charges of making unneutral utterances. Unitarian. Died in Lisbon, Portugal, March 5, 1916 (age 54 years, 179 days). Interment at Swan Point Cemetery, Providence, R.I.
  Relatives: Son of William G. Arnold and Lucy M. (Aldrich) Arnold; married, April 12, 1889, to Grace Angell.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Victor Hugo Duras — also known as Victor H. Duras — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Nebraska. Republican. Candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1908 (12th District), 1910 (14th District); alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1912; U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul in Liège, 1913-14; U.S. Vice Consul in Petrograd, 1914-15; arrested in August, 1916, in Russia, on suspicion of being a German spy; freed in 1917. Burial location unknown.
  Presumably named for: Victor Hugo
  Roger Culver Tredwell (1885-1961) — also known as Roger C. Tredwell — of Bloomington, Monroe County, Ind.; Washington, D.C.; Ridgefield, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., January 12, 1885. U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul General in Yokohama, 1910-11; U.S. Deputy Consul General in London, 1911; U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul in Burslem, 1911-12; Dresden, 1912; U.S. Consul in Bristol, 1913-14; Amsterdam, 1914; Naples, 1914; Leghorn, 1914-15; Turin, 1915-16; Rome, 1916-17; while working as American consul, he was arrested and imprisoned by the Russian Bolshevik authorities in Tashkent, 1918-19; U.S. Consul General in Hong Kong, 1925-29; Stockholm, as of 1932. Died in Ridgefield, Fairfield County, Conn., July 12, 1961 (age 76 years, 181 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Alanson Tredwell and Frances Vail (Culver) Tredwell; married to Winifred van Shaick Reed (died 1921).
  See also Wikipedia article
  David C. Kerr — U.S. Vice Consul in Birmingham, as of 1917; arrested in Washington, D.C. in May 1924, and charged with accepting bribes while vice consul at Vancouver, to issue visas to Chinese, so they could enter the U.S. illegally. Burial location unknown.
  Smedley Darlington Butler (1881-1940) — also known as Smedley Butler; "The Fighting Quaker"; "Old Gimlet Eye" — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in West Chester, Chester County, Pa., July 30, 1881. Republican. Major general in U.S. Marine Corps; received a Medal of Honor for the capture of Veracruz, Mexico, 1914; received another for the capture of Fort Riviere, Haiti, 1915; Philadelphia police commissioner, 1924-25; arrested and court-martialed in 1931 over his unauthorized disclosure of an incident unflattering to Italian dictator Italian Benito Mussolini; retired from the service rather than apologize to Mussolini; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1932. Quaker. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., June 21, 1940 (age 58 years, 327 days). Interment at Oaklands Cemetery, West Chester, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Stalker Butler and Maud Mary (Darlington) Butler; married, June 30, 1905, to Ethel Conway Peters (1879-1962); grandson of Smedley Darlington and Samuel Butler; second great-grandnephew of Edward Darlington (1755-1825); first cousin thrice removed of Isaac Darlington, William Darlington (1782-1863), Esther Darlington (1793-1877; who married James B. Roberts), Edward Darlington (1795-1884) and William Darlington (1804-1879); second cousin twice removed of Edward C. Darlington; fourth cousin of Darlington Hoopes (1896-1989).
  Political family: Darlington-Butler family of West Chester, Pennsylvania.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
Samuel Insull Samuel Insull (1859-1938) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill.; Kenilworth, Cook County, Ill.; near Libertyville, Lake County, Ill. Born in London, England, November 11, 1859. Republican. Associate of Thomas Edison and executive of electric utilities; one of the founders of the company that became General Electric; also had major holdings in railroads; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1904; when his utility holding company collapsed, wiping out the stockholders, he fled the country; indicted in 1932 on fraud and embezzlement charges; ultimately extradited from Turkey in 1934; tried in Chicago and found not guilty. Congregationalist. Member, Union League. Died from a heart attack, in the Place de la Concorde station on the Paris Métro subway system, Paris, France, July 16, 1938 (age 78 years, 247 days). Interment at Putney Vale Cemetery, London, England.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Insull and Emma (Short) Insull; married, May 24, 1899, to Margaret A. Bird (1875-1953; actress, stage name 'Gladys Wallis').
  Cross-reference: Forest A. Harness
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Time Magazine, November 29, 1926
  Ernest Lee Jahncke (1877-1960) — also known as "Commodore" — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., October 13, 1877. Republican. Engineer; president, Jahncke Dry Docks, New Orleans; U.S. assistant secretary of the Navy, 1929-33; named a Commodore in 1931, and a Rear Admiral in the naval reserve in 1955; delegate to Republican National Convention from Louisiana, 1932, 1936 (alternate). Episcopalian. German ancestry. Member, Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Expelled from the International Olympic Committee in July 1936 after taking a strong stand against the Nazi-organized Berlin Games. Died in Pass Christian, Harrison County, Miss., November 16, 1960 (age 83 years, 34 days). Entombed at Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Son of Frederick 'Fritz' Jahncke (1847-1911) and Margaret (Lee) Jahncke (1853-1913); brother of Walter Frederick Jahncke (1880-1947); married, June 1, 1907, to Cora Van Voorhis 'Mimi' Stanton (1883-1970; granddaughter of Edwin McMasters Stanton).
  Political family: Jahncke-Stanton family of New Orleans, Louisiana.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Felix L. Sparks — of Colorado. Colonel in the U.S. Army during World War II; one of the heroes of the Anzio beachhead in 1944; on April 29, 1945, he captured the Dachau concentration camp, and under orders to permit no one in or out, refused entry to a brigadier general from another unit; court-martial charges were drawn up, and Sparks was arrested; the charges were dismissed by General Patton; justice of Colorado state supreme court, 1956. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Robert Alexander Vogeler (1911-1992) — also known as Robert A. Vogeler — of Bedford, Westchester County, N.Y.; Cos Cob, Greenwich, Fairfield County, Conn.; Mt. Kisco, Westchester County, N.Y.; Horseheads, Chemung County, N.Y. Born in Jackson Heights, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., September 6, 1911. Republican. Vice-president, International Telephone and Telegraph; arrested by the Hungarian Communist government in 1949, tortured, tried and convicted of espionage; released in 1951; honored guest, Republican National Convention, 1952. Episcopalian. German and French ancestry. Died in Horseheads, Chemung County, N.Y., April 22, 1992 (age 80 years, 229 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Willy R. Vogeler and Marie J. (Besse) Vogeler; married 1939 to Lucile Eykens (1914-1979); married, October 10, 1987, to Muriel E. Rose.
  Cross-reference: Nathaniel P. Davis
  John Stewart Service (1909-1999) — also known as John S. Service — Born in Chengdu, China, August 3, 1909. U.S. Consul in Wellington, as of 1947. One of several U.S. diplomats whose wartime reports from China detailed the weakness and corruption of Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalist government, and and accurately predicted the triumph of the Chinese Communists in the ensuing civil war. These reports were held against him as evidence of disloyalty, notably by Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy, who in 1950 called him "a known associate and collaborator with Communists." Under pressure from McCarthy, the State Department dismissed him in 1951; he was reinstated by a unanimous ruling of the U.S. Supreme Court in 1956. Died in Oakland, Alameda County, Calif., February 3, 1999 (age 89 years, 184 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1932 to Carolina Schulz.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Gus Hall (1910-2000) — also known as Arvo Kustaa Halberg — of Youngstown, Mahoning County, Ohio; Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Virginia, St. Louis County, Minn., October 8, 1910. Communist. Steelworker; union organizer and one of the leaders of the steelworkers' strike in 1937; candidate for mayor of Youngstown, Ohio, 1937; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; indicted in 1948, and convicted in 1949, under the Smith Act, of conspiring to teach the violent overthrow of the U.S. government; fled to Mexico; arrested in 1951 and sent back; spent eight years in prison; candidate for President of the United States, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1984. Finnish ancestry. Died, of complications from diabetes, in Lenox Hill Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 13, 2000 (age 90 years, 5 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park, Ill.
  Relatives: Married 1935 to Elizabeth Turner.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Joseph Edward Casey (1898-1980) — also known as Joseph E. Casey — of Clinton, Worcester County, Mass. Born in Clinton, Worcester County, Mass., December 27, 1898. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1924 (alternate), 1932, 1940, 1944, 1948; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 3rd District, 1935-43; defeated, 1926, 1928; candidate for U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1942. Catholic. Member, Knights of Columbus; Elks; Eagles; American Legion. In 1951-52, a U.S. Senate committee investigated transactions in which a group he led made enormous profits from the purchase and re-sale of surplus U.S. tanker ships following World War II; since federal law required that sales be made only to U.S. citizens, his group allegedly set up several dummy corporations purportedly under American ccontrol, and faked financial statements for them, to buy the tankers on behalf of shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis. A federal indictment against him, over these actions, was unsealed in February 1954, but the charges were dismissed in September. Onassis, also indicted, pleaded guilty and paid a fine. Died September 1, 1980 (age 81 years, 249 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of John Edward Casey and Winifred M. (Carey) Casey; married to Constance Dudley.
  Cross-reference: Julius C. Holmes — Edward R. Stettinius, Jr.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
Julius C. Holmes Julius Cecil Holmes (1899-1968) — also known as Julius C. Holmes — of Lawrence, Douglas County, Kan. Born in Pleasanton, Linn County, Kan., April 24, 1899. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Foreign Service officer; U.S. Vice Consul in Marseille, as of 1926; Smyrna, as of 1927-29; Tirana, 1930; general in the U.S. Army during World War II; executive officer, U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, 1942; assistant U.S. Secretary of State, 1944-45; U.S. Consul General in Hong Kong, 1959-61; U.S. Ambassador to Iran, 1961-65. In 1951-52, a U.S. Senate committee investigated how a group, including Holmes as well as former U.S. Rep. Joseph E. Casey and former Secretary of State Edward R. Stettinius, Jr., made large profits from the purchase and re-sale of surplus U.S. tanker ships following World War II. Under federal law, ships could be sold only to U.S citizens, so the group allegedly set up several dummy corporations purportedly under American control, and faked financial statements for them, to buy the tankers on behalf of Greek-Argentine shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis. A federal indictment against Holmes was ultimately dropped. Onassis, also indicted, pleaded guilty and paid a fine. Died July 16, 1968 (age 69 years, 83 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Louella Jane (Trussell) Holmes (1867-1956) and James Reuben Holmes (1868-1946); married to Henrietta Allen (1900-1972).
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: New York Times, February 24, 1954
  Edward Reilly Stettinius, Jr. (1900-1949) — also known as Edward R. Stettinius, Jr. — Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., October 22, 1900. U.S. Secretary of State, 1944-45; U.S. Representative to United Nations, 1945-46. In 1951-52, a U.S. Senate committee investigated transactions in which a group, including Stettinus as well as former U.S. Rep. Joseph E. Casey and diplomat Julius C. Holmes, made large profits from the purchase and re-sale of surplus U.S. tanker ships following World War II. Since federal law required that sales be made only to U.S. citizens, the group allegedly set up dummy corporations purportedly under American control, and faked financial statements for them, to buy the tankers on behalf of Greek-Argentine shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis. Criminal indictments against Casey and Holmes were ultimately dismissed; Onassis pleaded guilty and paid a fine. Died in Greenwich, Fairfield County, Conn., October 31, 1949 (age 49 years, 9 days). Interment at Locust Valley Cemetery, Locust Valley, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Edward R. Stettinius and Judith (Carrington) Stettinius.
  Epitaph: "Blessed Are The Pure In Heart."
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Wheeler Thayer (1910-1969) — also known as Charles W. Thayer — of Villanova, Delaware County, Pa.; Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Villanova, Delaware County, Pa., February 9, 1910. U.S. Vice Consul in Moscow, 1937, 1940; Berlin, 1937-38; Hamburg, 1939-40; Kabul, as of 1943; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War II; head of the State Department's international broadcasting division, including the "Voice of America", 1947-49; U.S. Consul General in Munich, 1952-53; in March 1953, when attacks on his loyalty by U.S. Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy inspired a State Department investigation into his diplomatic career, he resigned from the Foreign Service; writer. Died, during heart surgery, in Salzburg, Austria, August 27, 1969 (age 59 years, 199 days). Interment at Church of the Redeemer Cemetery, Bryn Mawr, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of George C. Thayer and Gertrude May (Wheeler) Thayer (c.1870-1964); brother of Avis Howard Thayer (1912-1981; who married Charles Eustis Bohlen); married, March 27, 1950, to Cynthia (Dunn) Cochrane (daughter of James Clement Dunn); uncle of Avis Thayer Bohlen (1940-).
  Political family: Bohlen-Eustis-Thayer family of Bryn Mawr and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Anthony Dryden Marshall (1924-2014) — also known as Anthony D. Marshall; Tony Marshall; Anthony Dryden Kuser — of Providence, Providence County, R.I.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 30, 1924. Republican. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; U.S. Consul in Istanbul, as of 1958-59; U.S. Ambassador to Malagasy Republic, 1969-71; Trinidad and Tobago, 1972-73; Kenya, 1973-77; Seychelles, 1976-77; in 1971, he was accused in press reports of involvement in a supposed plot to overthrow the President, Philibert Tsiranana; the Malagasy government declared him persona non grata, and expelled him fron the country; theatrical producer; guardian of his ailing mother, Brooke Astor; alleged to have diverted millions of dollars to his own theatrical productions, and removed works of art from her apartment; his son Philip sued, alleging abuse and demanding his removal as guardian; an independent investigation found no evidence for abuse, but revealed financial misconduct; indicted in 2007, and tried on 16 charges in 2009; the trial lasted six months; ultimately convicted and sentenced to one to three years in prison; served eight weeks and was released on medical parole. Member, Rotary. Died, at New York Presbyterian Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 30, 2014 (age 90 years, 184 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Step-son of Charles H. Marshall and Vincent Astor; son of John Dryden Kuser (1897-1964) and Brooke (Russell) Marshall (1902-2007); married, July 26, 1947, to Elizabeth Cynthia Cryan; married, December 29, 1962, to Thelma Hoegnell (divorced 1992); married 1992 to Charlene (Tyler) Gilbert; great-grandson of John Fairfield Dryden.
  Political family: Dryden-Marshall family of New York City, New York.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Anthony D. Marshall: Meryl Gordon, Mrs. Astor Regrets: The Hidden Betrayals of a Family Beyond Reproach
  Deane Roesch Hinton (1923-2017) — also known as Deane R. Hinton — of Illinois. Born in Fort Missoula, Missoula County, Mont., March 12, 1923. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; Foreign Service officer; U.S. Ambassador to Zaire, 1974-75; El Salvador, 1981-83; Pakistan, 1983-86; Costa Rica, 1987-90; Panama, 1990-94; declared persona non grata by the government of Zaire, June 18, 1975. Died in San Jose, Costa Rica, March 28, 2017 (age 94 years, 16 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Joe A. Hinton and Doris (Roesch) Hinton.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
Oliver L. North Oliver Laurence North (b. 1943) — also known as Oliver L. North; Ollie North — of Virginia. Born in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., October 7, 1943. Republican. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Vietnam War; central figure in the Iran-Contra scandal of 1986; he was in charge of a secret (and illegal) government operation to sell weapons to Iran and provide the profits to the then-unrecognized Nicaraguan "contras", who were fighting a civil war against the "Sandinista" government there; convicted in 1989 on federal charges of obstructing Congress, destroying documents, and accepting an illegal gratuity; an appeals court later overturned the guilty verdict; candidate for U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1994; host of a radio talk show in 1995-2003, and is a television commentator. Member, National Rifle Association. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Married, November 13, 1968, to Betsy Stuart.
  Cross-reference: Harry E. Bergold, Jr.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Image source: Time Magazine, July 13, 1987
  William A. Wilson (b. 1914) — of California. Born in 1914. U.S. Ambassador to Vatican, 1984-86; reprimanded by the State Department for his unauthorized diplomatic mission to Libya. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Tom Metzger — of California; Warsaw, Kosciusko County, Ind. Democratic candidate for U.S. Representative from California 43rd District, 1980; candidate in Democratic primary for U.S. Senator from California, 1982; convicted in 1991 of burning a cross (as a form of hate speech or intimidation) and sentenced to prison; in 1992, he was arrested in Canada for violating immigration laws. Member, John Birch Society; Ku Klux Klan. Still living as of 2012.
  See also Wikipedia article
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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