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Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble: 1870 to 1879

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in approximate chronological order

  William Woods Holden (1818-1892) — also known as William W. Holden — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Orange County, N.C., November 24, 1818. Newspaper editor; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1860; delegate to North Carolina secession convention, 1861; Governor of North Carolina, 1865, 1868-70; postmaster at Raleigh, N.C., 1873-81. Methodist. Impeached and removed from office as Governor in 1870, over corruption scandal. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., March 1, 1892 (age 73 years, 98 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Raleigh, N.C.
  Relatives: Married to Ann Augusta Young (1819-1852); father of Ida Augustus Holden (who married Calvin Josiah Cowles (1821-1907)); grandfather of Charles Holden Cowles.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Baldwin-Greene-Upson-Hoar family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  David Christy Butler (1829-1891) — also known as David C. Butler — of Nebraska. Born December 15, 1829. Republican. Member of Nebraska territorial House of Representatives, 1861; member Nebraska territorial council, 1864; Governor of Nebraska, 1867-71; removed 1871; member of University of Nebraska board of regents, 1869-71; impeached on March 4, 1871, and removed from office as Governor on June 2, 1871. Member, Freemasons. Died May 25, 1891 (age 61 years, 161 days). Interment at Pawnee City Cemetery, Pawnee City, Neb.
  Butler County, Neb. is named for him.
  Abraham Oakey Hall (1826-1898) — also known as A. Oakey Hall; "Elegant Oakey" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., July 26, 1826. Republican. Newspaper reporter; lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1856; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1869-72; indicted and tried in 1871-73 on charges of covering up corruption during his mayoralty; acquitted. Presbyterian; later Catholic. English, Welsh, and French ancestry. Died, of heart disease, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 7, 1898 (age 72 years, 73 days). Entombed at Trinity Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Clay Warmoth (1842-1931) — also known as Henry C. Warmoth — of Lawrence, Plaquemines Parish, La. Born in McLeansboro, Hamilton County, Ill., May 9, 1842. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Louisiana, 1868, 1888, 1896, 1900, 1908, 1912; Governor of Louisiana, 1868-72; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1888-92. Episcopalian. Impeached as Governor in 1872 during election contest over successor. Died in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., September 30, 1931 (age 89 years, 144 days). Interment at Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, La.
  Presumably named for: Henry Clay
  Relatives: Married, May 30, 1877, to Sally Durand.
  See also Wikipedia article
  William Magear Tweed (1823-1878) — also known as William M. Tweed; William Marcy Tweed; "Boss Tweed" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 3, 1823. Democrat. Chairmaker; fire fighter; U.S. Representative from New York 5th District, 1853-55; member of New York state senate 4th District, 1868-73. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Odd Fellows; Freemasons. Convicted of embezzlement and sentenced to twelve years in prison; escaped; captured in Spain and brought back to New York. Died in prison, in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 12, 1878 (age 55 years, 9 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Tweed and Eliza (Magear) Tweed; married, September 18, 1844, to Mary Jane C. Skaden.
  Cross-reference: Charles O'Conor — Thomas Nast — George G. Barnard — Albert Cardozo
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Books about William M. Tweed: Seymour J. Mandelbaum, Boss Tweed's New York — Leo Hershkowitz, Tweed's New York : another look — Kenneth D. Ackerman, Boss Tweed: The Rise and Fall of the Corrupt Pol Who Conceived the Soul of Modern New York
  Albert Cardozo (1828-1885) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., December 21, 1828. Lawyer; a close ally of corrupt New York City political boss William M. Tweed; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1868-72; resigned 1872; in 1872, an effort was made to impeach him, along with Justice George G. Barnard, on charges that they abused judicial power in various ways to serve Boss Tweed, as well as "robber barons" Jay Gould and Jim Fisk; rather than go through an impeachment trial, Cardozo resigned from the bench; meanwhile, Barnard's impeachment went forward, and he was unanimously convicted. Jewish. Portugese ancestry. Died, from Bright's disease, in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 8, 1885 (age 56 years, 322 days). Interment at Cypress Hills Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Michael H. Cardozo and Ellen (Hart) Cardozo; married to Rebecca Washington Nathan; father of Benjamin Nathan Cardozo (1870-1938).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Robert Cumming Schenck (1809-1890) — also known as Robert C. Schenck — of Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio. Born in Franklin, Warren County, Ohio, October 4, 1809. Lawyer; member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1839-43; U.S. Representative from Ohio, 1843-51, 1863-71 (3rd District 1843-51, 1863-67, 5th District 1867-69, 3rd District 1869-71); U.S. Minister to Brazil, 1851-53; Great Britain, 1870-76; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. While U.S. minister to Great Britain in 1871, he promoted the sale of shares in the Emma Silver Mine Company, of which was a director; quietly sold his own shares before news about the mine's depletion caused their value to collapse. His diplomatic immunity enabled him to avoid facing fraud charges in a British court. Died in Washington, D.C., March 23, 1890 (age 80 years, 170 days). Interment at Woodland Cemetery, Dayton, Ohio.
  Cross-reference: John W. Chanler
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — U.S. State Dept career summary
  George Gardner Barnard (c.1829-1879) — also known as George G. Barnard — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, N.Y., about 1829. Democrat. Lawyer; a close ally of corrupt New York City political boss William M. Tweed; Recorder, New York City, 1858-60; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1861-72; removed 1872; impeached by the New York legislature in 1872, on charges that he abused his judicial power through the takeover of several railroads, putting them under the control of receivers who were allied with "robber barons" Jay Gould and Jim Fisk; the Union Pacific and other railroads had to relocate their headquarters away from New York City to evade the jurisdiction of Barnard and Justice Albert Cardozo; Barnard was unanimously convicted by the Court of Impeachment, and also barred from holding office of any kind. Died, from Bright's disease, in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 27, 1879 (age about 50 years). Entombed at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Frederic Barnard (1780-1866) and Margaret (Allen) Barnard (1792-1869); brother of Joseph Folger Barnard (1823-1904); married, June 29, 1859, to Frances Anderson (1840-1874).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Brooks (1810-1873) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, November 10, 1810. Democrat. Newspaper publisher; member of Maine state house of representatives, 1835; member of New York state assembly from New York County 16th District, 1848; U.S. Representative from New York, 1849-53, 1863-66, 1867-73 (6th District 1849-53, 8th District 1863-66, 1867-73, 6th District 1873); died in office 1873; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1867. Censured by the House in 1873 for his role in the Credit Mobilier bribery scandal. Died in Washington, D.C., April 30, 1873 (age 62 years, 171 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Betsey (Folsom) Brooks (1780-1850) and James Brooks (1788-1814); married, July 10, 1841, to Mary Louisa Randolph; father of James Wilton Brooks; third cousin twice removed of Samuel Adams (1722-1803); fourth cousin once removed of Joseph Allen, Caleb Cushing and Orville Samuel Basford.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Saltonstall-Weeks family of Massachusetts; Adams-Waite-Forshee-Cowan family of Dexter, Michigan; Pike family of Lubec, Maine; Kidder family of Connecticut; Adams-Rusling family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Seeger — of St. Peter, Nicollet County, Minn. Republican. Minnesota state treasurer, 1872-73. After disclosure that he had accepted his predecessor's note for $112,000 of missing state funds, and had concealed this fact from investigators, he resigned; in spite of that, he was subsequently impeached and removed from office. The lost money was recovered from Seeger's bondsmen, and no criminal prosecution was made. Burial location unknown.
  Corliss P. Stone (1838-1906) — of Seattle, King County, Wash. Born in Franklin County, Vt., March 20, 1838. Mayor of Seattle, Wash., 1872-73. Caused a scandal in 1873, when he suddenly vacated his mayoralty; he fled to San Francisco with a married woman and $15,000 he had embezzled from his firm. Later returned to Seattle. Died in Seattle, King County, Wash., September 14, 1906 (age 68 years, 178 days). Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Seattle, Wash.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Oakes Ames (1804-1873) — of North Easton, Easton, Bristol County, Mass. Born in Easton, Bristol County, Mass., January 10, 1804. Republican. U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 2nd District, 1863-73. He and his brother Oliver Ames, president of the Union Pacific Railroad, prime movers in construction of the first transcontinental railroad line, completed in 1869; he was as censured by the House of Representatives in 1873 for his role in the Credit Mobilier bribery scandal. Died in Easton, Bristol County, Mass., May 8, 1873 (age 69 years, 118 days). Interment at Village Cemetery, North Easton, Easton, Mass.; memorial monument at Oliver and Oakes Ames Monument, Sherman, Wyo.
  Relatives: Son of Oliver Ames (1779-1863) and Susannah (Angier) Ames (1783-1847); brother of Oliver Ames, Jr.; married to Eveline Gilmore (1809-1882); father of Oliver Ames (1831-1895); third cousin thrice removed of John Adams; fourth cousin of Alfred Elisha Ames; fourth cousin once removed of Albert Alonzo Ames (1842-1911).
  Political family: Ames family of North Easton, Massachusetts (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The city of Ames, Iowa, is named for him.  — The community of Ames, Nebraska, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edmund Jackson Davis (1827-1883) — also known as Edmund J. Davis — of Texas. Born in St. Augustine, St. Johns County, Fla., October 2, 1827. Republican. District judge in Texas, 1856-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1866; Governor of Texas, 1870-74; defeated, 1873, 1880; member of Republican National Committee from Texas, 1872-74; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas 10th District, 1882. After his defeat as Governor, he refused to give up the office, and barricaded himself in the state capitol. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., February 7, 1883 (age 55 years, 128 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of Forbes N. Britton (1820?-1861).
  Cross-reference: J. Goldsteen Dupree
  Books about Edmund J. Davis: Carl H. Moneyhon, Edmund J. Davis of Texas: Civil War General, Republican Leader, Reconstruction Governor
Richard Croker Richard Welsted Croker (1841-1922) — also known as Richard Croker — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; County Dublin, Ireland. Born in Clonakilty, County Cork, Ireland, November 23, 1841. Democrat. Railroad mechanic; charged with the murder of a political enemy in 1874; tried and found not guilty; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1888, 1892. Irish ancestry. Member, Tammany Hall. Leader of Tammany Hall from 1886 until 1901. Suffered exposure during a snowstorm, was ill for months, and subsequently died, in County Dublin, Ireland, April 29, 1922 (age 80 years, 157 days). Original interment at Glencairn House Grounds, County Dublin, Ireland; reinterment in 1939 at Kilgobbin Cemetery, County Dublin, Ireland.
  Relatives: Son of Eyre Coote Croker (1800-1881) and Frances Laura (Welsted) Croker (1807-1894); married, November 1, 1873, to Elizabeth Frazer (1853-1914); married, November 26, 1914, to Bula Benton Edmonson (1884-1957).
  Cross-reference: Henry Woltman
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, February 1902
  William Adams Richardson (1821-1896) — of Massachusetts. Born in Tyngsborough, Middlesex County, Mass., November 2, 1821. Republican. Probate judge in Massachusetts, 1856; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1873-74; while Secretary of the Treasury, he hired John D. Sanborn to collect unpaid taxes and receive a commission, some of which went as a kickback to Richardson himself; this arrangement caused an uproar, and Richardson resigned under fire; Judge of U.S. Court of Claims, 1874-96. Unitarian. Died in Washington, D.C., October 19, 1896 (age 74 years, 352 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Almar F. Dickson (1846-1915) — of Edgartown, Martha's Vineyard, Dukes County, Mass.; East Haddam, Middlesex County, Conn. Born in East Haddam, Middlesex County, Conn., January 20, 1846. Democrat. On August 1, 1874, in Oak Bluffs, Massachusetts, in response to the suspected seduction of his wife and her two sisters, he and his brother-in-law Caleb Smith were among a group of five men who, at midnight during a storm, attempted to kidnap at gunpoint Samuel K. Elliot, one of the supposed perpetrators, so they could tar and feather him; Elliot successfully defended himself from the group, and during the affray, Caleb Smith was shot dead; Elliot was ruled to have acted in self-defense, and denied any improper relations with the women; the scandal was widely publicized in the press; Dickson and his wife were divorced soon after; U.S. Consul in Gaspé Basin, 1887-1908; candidate for Connecticut state house of representatives from East Haddam, 1910, 1912. Died in Hartford, Hartford County, Conn., April 17, 1915 (age 69 years, 87 days). Interment at Moodus Cemetery, Moodus, East Haddam, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel S. Dickson (1812-1871) and Hannah 'Betsy' (Hill) Dickson (1816-1877); married, August 14, 1870, to Elizabeth Chase 'Lizzie' Smith (1852-1915); married, May 17, 1883, to Callie (Brainard) Wetherell (1863-1936); second cousin once removed of Charles Russell Kelsey; third cousin twice removed of David Kelsey and Elisha Kelsey; third cousin thrice removed of Henry Champion, Epaphroditus Champion and Joshua Coit; fourth cousin once removed of Ashbel Griswold, David Parmalee Kelsey and Samuel Townsend Douglass (1814-1898).
  Political families: Pendleton family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Porter-Kelsey family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph Williams Thorne (b. 1816) — also known as J. Williams Thorne — of Chester County, Pa.; Warren County, N.C. Born in Pennsylvania, December 25, 1816. Republican. Delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1875; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1875; expelled 1875; member of North Carolina state senate; elected 1876. Expelled in 1875 from the North Carolina House as an "infidel," reportedly for his support of Darwin's theory of evolution. Interment at Longwood Cemetery, Longwood, Pa.
  John Doyle Lee (1812-1877) — also known as John D. Lee — Born in Kaskaskia, Randolph County, Ill., September 6, 1812. Member of Utah territorial House of Representatives, 1858. Mormon. Involved in the Mountain Meadows massacre on September 11, 1857, when a Mormon militia and Paiute Indian tribesmen slaughtered about 120 settlers who had been traveling through Utah by wagon train; indicted for murder almost twenty years later, and tried in 1875; the first trial ended in a hung jury; retried in 1876; convicted and sentenced to death; released for a time in order to settle his business affairs; executed by firing squad, at Mountain Meadows, Washington County, Utah, March 23, 1877 (age 64 years, 198 days). Interment at Panguitch Cemetery, Panguitch, Utah.
  Relatives: Grandfather of Louise Lee (1893-1974; who married Levi Stewart Udall) and Lela Lee (1895-1976; who married Jesse Addison Udall); great-grandfather of Stewart Lee Udall, Morris King Udall, Lee Kenyon Udall and Rex E. Lee; second great-grandfather of Milan Dale Smith, Jr. (1942-), Thomas Stewart Udall, Mark E. Udall, Gordon Harold Smith and Mike Lee.
  Political family: Udall family of Arizona.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Worth Belknap (1829-1890) — also known as William W. Belknap — of Iowa. Born in Newburgh, Orange County, N.Y., September 22, 1829. Lawyer; member of Iowa state house of representatives, 1857-58; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Secretary of War, 1869-76. Impeached in 1876 by the House of Representatives for taking bribes; resigned on March 2, 1876. Despite arguments that the Senate lacked jurisdiction after his resignation, an impeachment trial was held; on August 1, the Senate voted 35 to 25 for his conviction, short of the necessary two-thirds. Died, of an apparent heart attack, in Washington, D.C., October 13, 1890 (age 61 years, 21 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of William Goldsmith Belknap (Mexican War general) and Ann (Clark) Belknap; married to Cora LeRoy, Carrie Thompson and Mrs. John Bower; father of Hugh Reid Belknap (1860-1901).
  Mount Belknap, in the Tushar Mountains, Beaver and Piute counties, Utah, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Tunis George Campbell (1812-1891) — also known as Tunis G. Campbell — of McIntosh County, Ga. Born in Middlebrook (unknown county), N.J., April 1, 1812. Minister; abolitionist; delegate to Georgia state constitutional convention, 1867; member of Georgia state senate, 1868, 1869-72; expelled 1868; defeated, 1872; expelled from the Georgia State Senate in 1868 based on the claim that only whites could serve; charged with falsely imprisoning white men as Justice of of the Peace, and served a year of hard labor in Georgia's brutal leased labor system. Methodist. African ancestry. Died in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., December 4, 1891 (age 79 years, 247 days). Burial location unknown.
  George C. Bennett — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Republican. Newspaper editor; member of New York state assembly from Kings County 8th District, 1872, 1874; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 4th District, 1874; Brooklyn Commissioner of City Works; indicted, along with John W. Flaherty, in December 1878, for conspiracy to defraud the city of $50,000; tried in 1879 and convicted; fined $250; the conviction was reversed on appeal; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1884. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Father of Charles Goodwin Bennett (1863-1914).
  John W. Flaherty — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Democrat. Independent Democratic candidate for New York state assembly from Kings County 7th District, 1874; Brooklyn Commissioner of City Works; indicted, along with George C. Bennett, in December 1878, for conspiracy to defraud the city of $50,000; tried and convicted; fined $250; the conviction, which he claimed was the work of Mayor James Howell and the corrupt "Brooklyn Ring", was reversed on appeal; candidate for mayor of Brooklyn, N.Y., 1879. Burial location unknown.
  Carl Adolphus Gottlieb Adae (1839-1915) — also known as Carl A. G. Adae — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Möckmühl, Germany, June 9, 1839. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; Vice-Consul for Germany in Cincinnati, Ohio, 1871-77; president of the C. F. Adae & Co. bank; after the bank became insolvent in December 1878, he was arrested and charged with bank fraud, that is, accepting deposits knowing that the bank was about to fail; the case was referred to the grand jury, but no indictments resulted; insurance agent. German ancestry. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., January 26, 1915 (age 75 years, 231 days). Interment at The Evergreens Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Johann Mattheaus Adae (1814-1899) and Marie Friederika Luis (Schwarz) Adae (1817-1859); brother of Otto Phillipp Max Adae; married to Anna Moody Culbertson (1848-1922); nephew of Carl Friedrich Adae (1815-1868).
  Political family: Adae family of Cincinnati, Ohio.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
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