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Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble: 1799 and earlier

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in approximate chronological order

  Jacob Leisler (c.1640-1691) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Bockenheim, Holy Roman Empire (now part of Frankfurt am Main, Germany), about 1640. Fur trader; tobacco business; following the English Revolution of 1688, which brought Protestant rulers William and Mary to power, he led "Leisler's Rebellion" and seized control of the colony; Colonial Governor of New York, 1689-91; provided land for a settlement of French Huguenot refugees (now the city of New Rochelle); following the arrival of a new royal governor, he was ousted. Arrested, charged with treason, tried, convicted, and sentenced to death; executed by hanging and decapitation, in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 16, 1691 (age about 51 years). Four years later, he was posthumously exonerated by an act of Parliament. Original interment at a private or family graveyard, New York County, N.Y.; subsequent interment at Dutch Church Burial Ground, Manhattan, N.Y.; reinterment to unknown location; statue at Broadview Avenue, New Rochelle, N.Y.
  Relatives: Great-grandfather of Nicholas Bayard (1736-1802).
  Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Cuthbert Bullitt (1740-1791) — Born in Fauquier County, Va., 1740. Lawyer; planter; shot and killed John Baylis in a duel on September 24, 1765; later tried for the killing and acquitted; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1776. Anglican; later Episcopalian. Died in Prince William County, Va., August 27, 1791 (age about 51 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Bullitt (1692-1766) and Sarah Elizabeth (Harrison) Bullitt (1700-1746); married, August 27, 1761, to Helen Scott; father of Alexander Scott Bullitt (1761-1816); second great-grandfather of William Christian Bullitt (1856-1914), William Marshall Bullitt and Alexander Scott Bullitt (1877-1932); second great-granduncle of Hugh Kennedy Bullitt; third great-grandfather of William Christian Bullitt (1891-1967).
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Bullitt-Fry-Henry family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Robert Alexander (c.1740-1805) — of Maryland. Born in Elkton, Cecil County, Md., about 1740. Planter; lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Maryland, 1775-76. Episcopalian. When the Declaration of Independence was promulgated, fled from Maryland to the British Fleet; in 1780, he was adjudged guilty of high treason, and his property was confiscated. Died in London, England, November 20, 1805 (age about 65 years). Burial location unknown.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Andrew Allen (1740-1825) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., 1740. Lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1775-76. Disapproved of the Declaration of Independence, and withdrew from the Continental Congress in June 1776; when the British Army entered New York, he took the oath of allegiance to the King, and went to England; he was attainted of treason, and his estates in Pennsylvania were confiscated. Died in London, England, March 7, 1825 (age about 84 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Allen and Margaret (Hamilton) Allen; married, April 21, 1768, to Sally Coxe.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  David Mathews (d. 1800) — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Nova Scotia. Lawyer; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1776-83. In 1776, the New York Provincial Congress ordered his arrest over his involvement in a plot to poison Gen. George Washington; continued serving as mayor during British occupation of the city; in 1783, he fled to Nova Scotia with other Loyalists. Died near Sydney, Nova Scotia, 1800. Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  John Joachim Zubly (1724-1781) — of Savannah, Chatham County, Ga. Born in St. Gall, Switzerland, August 27, 1724. Ordained minister; Delegate to Continental Congress from Georgia, 1775-76; accused of treason against the Continental Congress and banished in 1777; half of his estate was confiscated; returned to Savannah in 1779. Presbyterian. Swiss ancestry. Died in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., July 23, 1781 (age 56 years, 330 days). Interment at Colonial Park Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.
  Relatives: Married 1746 to Anna Tobler.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Williams (1752-1806) — of Charlotte County (now Washington County), N.Y. Born in Barnstable, England, 1752. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New York state senate Eastern District, 1777-78, 1782-95; member of New York state assembly from Charlotte County, 1781-82; delegate to New York convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Washington and Clinton counties, 1788; member of New York council of appointment, 1789; U.S. Representative from New York 9th District, 1795-99; county judge in New York, 1800. Expelled for misconduct from the state senate in 1778. Died in Salem, Washington County, N.Y., July 22, 1806 (age about 54 years). Interment at Salem Cemetery, Salem, N.Y.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Joseph Galloway (1731-1803) — of Pennsylvania. Born in West River, Anne Arundel County, Md., 1731. Member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1757-75; Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1774-75. Opposed independence for the Colonies and remained loyal to King George; joined the British Army; moved to England; in 1778, the General Assembly of Pennsylvania convicted him of high treason and confiscated his estates. Died in Watford, Hertfordshire, England, August 29, 1803 (age about 72 years). Burial location unknown.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Abraham Jones — of Richmond County, N.Y. Member of New York state assembly from Richmond County, 1777-78; removed 1778. Expelled from the New York Assembly (his seat was declared vacant) on June 8, 1778, for "being with the enemy.". Died on shipboard in the North Atlantic Ocean, en route back from Canada. Buried at sea in North Atlantic Ocean.
  Isaac Low (1735-1791) — of New York. Born in Raritan Landing (now part of Piscataway), Middlesex County, N.J., April 13, 1735. Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1774. Was opposed to armed conflict with Great Britain; accused of treason and imprisoned; his property was confiscated through a bill of attainder in 1779; moved to England in 1783. Died in Cowes, Isle of Wight, England, July 25, 1791 (age 56 years, 103 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Brother of Nicholas Low (1739-1826); married to Margaret Cuyler (brother of Abraham Cornelius Cuyler).
  Political family: Low-Cuyler family of New York.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Ephraim Paine (1730-1785) — of New York. Born in Canterbury, Windham County, Conn., August 19, 1730. County judge in New York, 1778-81; member of New York state senate Middle District, 1779-81, 1782-85; Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1784. Expelled from the New York State Senate on March 15, 1781, for neglect of duty. Died in Amenia, Dutchess County, N.Y., August 10, 1785 (age 54 years, 356 days). Interment at Red Meeting House Cemetery, Near Amenia, Dutchess County, N.Y.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Henry Osborne (1751-1800) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa.; Camden County, Ga. Born in Newtown Limavady (now Limavady), County Londonderry, Ireland (now Northern Ireland), August 21, 1751. Delegate to Continental Congress from Georgia, 1786; justice of Georgia state supreme court, 1787-89; superior court judge in Georgia, 1789-91. Removed from offices he held in Pennsylvania in June 1783 following the supreme executive council's determination that he was a bigamist; convicted by the Georgia senate in December 1791 of election fraud. Died in St. Simons Island, Glynn County, Ga., November 9, 1800 (age 49 years, 80 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Memucan Hunt — of Granville County, N.C. Member of North Carolina state senate from Granville County, 1777, 1779-81, 1788; North Carolina state treasurer, 1784-87. In 1786, charges of misconduct were brought against him and heard by the Legislature in joint session; two days later, he was defeated for re-election. Burial location unknown.
  Matthew Lyon (1749-1822) — of Eddyville, Lyon County, Ky. Born in County Wicklow, Ireland, July 14, 1749. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Vermont state house of representatives, 1779-83; U.S. Representative from Vermont 1st District, 1797-1801; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1802; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1st District, 1803-11; defeated, 1810. Convicted and jailed in 1789 under the Sedition Act. Died in Spadra Bluff, Johnson County, Ark., August 1, 1822 (age 73 years, 18 days). Original interment at Spadra Bluff Cemetery, Spadra Bluff, Ark.; reinterment in 1833 at River View Cemetery, Eddyville, Ky.
  Relatives: Married to Mary Hosford (1744-1784) and Beulah Chittenden (1764-1824; daughter of Thomas Chittenden (1730-1797); sister of Martin Chittenden); father of Chittenden Lyon; great-grandfather of William Peters Hepburn.
  Political family: Chittenden-Lyon family.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Matthew Lyon: Aleine Austin, Matthew Lyon, 'New Man' of the Democratic Revolution, 1749-1822
  Joseph Roffignac (1766-1846) — also known as Louis Philippe Joseph de Rouffignac — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in Angoulême, France, 1766. Fled France in 1789 to escape the guillotine, presumably over disloyalty to the revolutionary regime; mayor of New Orleans, La., 1820-28. French ancestry. Suffered a stroke, and dropped the gun he was holding, which accidentally discharged, shooting him in the head and killing him, in Périgueux, France, 1846 (age about 80 years). Burial location unknown.
  Alexander Moultrie (1750-1807) — Born in Charleston, Charleston District (now Charleston County), S.C., July 2, 1750. South Carolina state attorney general, 1776-92; impeached for embezzling state money into the Yazoo Land Company, and resigned. Died in Charleston, Charleston District (now Charleston County), S.C., August, 1807 (age 57 years, 0 days). Interment at St. Philip's Churchyard, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Moultrie (1702-1771) and Elizabeth (Wilkins) Moultrie (1705-1776); half-brother of William Moultrie (1730-1805); married, May 24, 1772, to Catherine Judith Lennox (1749-1814).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Blount (1749-1800) — Born in Windsor, Bertie County, N.C., April 6, 1749. Member of North Carolina house of commons, 1781, 1783; Delegate to Continental Congress from North Carolina, 1782-83, 1786-87; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; member of North Carolina state senate, 1788; Governor of Southwest Territory, 1790-96; delegate to Tennessee state constitutional convention, 1796; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1796-97; member of Tennessee state senate, 1798-1800; died in office 1800; Speaker of the Tennessee State Senate, 1798-99. Presbyterian. Became involved in a conspiracy to turn Florida over to British control; when this plot was uncovered in 1797, was expelled from the U.S. Senate; afterwards, on July 7, 1797, he was impeached, but the Senate dropped the matter for lack of jurisdiction. Died in Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., March 21, 1800 (age 50 years, 349 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Knoxville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Jacob Blount and Barbara (Gray) Blount; half-brother of William Blount; brother of Thomas Blount (1759-1812); married, February 12, 1778, to Mary Grainger; father of William Grainger Blount.
  Political family: Blount family of North Carolina.
  Blount County, Tenn. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Robert Morris (1734-1806) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Liverpool, England, January 31, 1734. Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1776; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1785; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1789-95. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Financier of the American Revolution, but went broke in the process. Imprisoned for debt from February 1798 to August 1801. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 8, 1806 (age 72 years, 97 days). Entombed at Christ Church Burial Ground, Philadelphia, Pa.; statue at Independence National Historical Park, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Morris (1711-1750) and Elizabeth (Murphet) Morris (1712-1778); married, March 2, 1769, to Mary White (1749-1827); father of Thomas Morris and Henrietta 'Hetty' Morris (1774-1816; who married James Markham Marshall (1764-1848)); great-grandfather of John Augustine Marshall.
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Biddle-Randolph family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Morris Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $10 silver certificate in the 1870s and 1880s.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Robert Morris: Charles Rappleye, Robert Morris: Financier of the American Revolution
  Nathaniel Peabody (1741-1823) — of Atkinson, Rockingham County, N.H. Born in Topsfield, Essex County, Mass., March 1, 1741. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New Hampshire state house of representatives, 1776-79, 1781-85, 1787-90, 1793-96; Delegate to Continental Congress from New Hampshire, 1779-80, 1785; delegate to New Hampshire state constitutional convention, 1782-83; member of New Hampshire Governor's Council, 1784-86; member of New Hampshire state senate from Rockingham County, 1785-86, 1790-93. Confined in a debtor's prison for about twenty years. Died in Exeter, Rockingham County, N.H., June 27, 1823 (age 82 years, 118 days). Interment at Old Cemetery, South Hampton, N.H.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
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