PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Quaker Politicians in Pennsylvania
(Religious Society of Friends)

  George M. Barnard (1881-1949) — of New Castle, Henry County, Ind. Born in New Castle, Henry County, Ind., June 6, 1881. Republican. Lawyer; Henry County Prosecuting Attorney, 1906-10; mayor of New Castle, Ind., 1910-14; member, Interstate Commerce Commission, 1944-49; died in office 1949. Quaker. Died, from a heart attack, in Washington, D.C., January 2, 1949 (age 67 years, 210 days). Interment at Longwood Cemetery, Longwood, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of William Oscar Barnard (1852-1939) and Mary V. (Ballenger) Barnard; married, October 4, 1911, to Marion Hannah Dingee.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Rudolph Blankenburg (1843-1918) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Lippe Detmold (now Lippstadt), Germany, February 16, 1843. Naturalized U.S. citizen; manufacturer; mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1911-16. Quaker or Unitarian. German ancestry. Member, American Academy of Political and Social Science. Died in Germantown, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., April 12, 1918 (age 75 years, 55 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Ludwig Blankenburg and Sophie (Goede) Blankenburg; married, April 18, 1867, to Lucretia M. Longshore.
  See also Wikipedia article
  William Curtis Bok (b. 1897) — also known as Curtis Bok — of Pennsylvania. Born in Wyncote, Montgomery County, Pa., September 7, 1897. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; lawyer; common pleas court judge in Pennsylvania, 1937-58; justice of Pennsylvania state supreme court; elected 1958. Quaker. Member, American Bar Association. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Edward William Bok and Mary Louise (Curtis) Bok.
  John H. Bradley (1805-1872) — of LaPorte County, Ind. Born in Chester County, Pa., 1805. Candidate for Indiana state senate, 1837; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1841-43; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Indiana, 1843; candidate for Presidential Elector for Indiana, 1848. Quaker. Died in Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind., August 14, 1872 (age about 67 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Brother of James Bradley (1810-1887).
  Smedley Darlington Butler (1881-1940) — also known as Smedley Butler; "The Fighting Quaker"; "Old Gimlet Eye" — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in West Chester, Chester County, Pa., July 30, 1881. Republican. Major general in U.S. Marine Corps; received a Medal of Honor for the capture of Veracruz, Mexico, 1914; received another for the capture of Fort Riviere, Haiti, 1915; Philadelphia police commissioner, 1924-25; arrested and court-martialed in 1931 over his unauthorized disclosure of an incident unflattering to Italian dictator Italian Benito Mussolini; retired from the service rather than apologize to Mussolini; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1932. Quaker. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., June 21, 1940 (age 58 years, 327 days). Interment at Oaklands Cemetery, West Chester, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Stalker Butler and Maud Mary (Darlington) Butler; married, June 30, 1905, to Ethel Conway Peters (1879-1962); grandson of Smedley Darlington and Samuel Butler; second great-grandnephew of Edward Darlington (1755-1825); first cousin thrice removed of Isaac Darlington, William Darlington (1782-1863), Esther Darlington (1793-1877; who married James B. Roberts), Edward Darlington (1795-1884) and William Darlington (1804-1879); second cousin twice removed of Edward C. Darlington; fourth cousin of Darlington Hoopes (1896-1989).
  Political family: Darlington-Butler family of West Chester, Pennsylvania.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Benjamin Chew (1722-1810) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Maryland, November 29, 1722. Lawyer; chief justice of Pennsylvania state supreme court, 1774-77. Quaker; later Anglican. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., January 20, 1810 (age 87 years, 52 days). Interment at St. Peter's Churchyard, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Chew (1693-1743) and Mary (Galloway) Chew (1697-1734); married to Mary Galloway (1729-1755) and Elizabeth Oswald (1732-1819); father of Margaret Oswald 'Peggy' Chew (1760-1827; who married John Eager Howard); grandfather of George Howard, Benjamin Chew Howard and Harriet Julianna Carroll (1808-1881; who married John Lee); great-grandfather of John Lee Carroll; second great-grandfather of John Howell Carroll; first cousin twice removed of Edward Shippen; first cousin thrice removed of Bertha Shippen Irving; second cousin once removed of Mary Chew (1735-1774; who married William Paca (1740-1799)); second cousin thrice removed of Edward Tilghman Paca; third cousin twice removed of Coleby Chew; third cousin thrice removed of Joseph Richard Chew, St. Clair Ballard and Lewis Ballard.
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Conard (1773-1857) — also known as "The Fighting Quaker" — of Pennsylvania. Born in Plumstead Township, Bucks County, Pa., November 15, 1773. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1st District, 1813-15; district judge in Pennsylvania, 1810. Quaker. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 9, 1857 (age 83 years, 175 days). Interment at St. Mary Anne's Protestant Episcopal Churchyard, North East, Md.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Jeremiah Cox (1763-1830) — of Wayne County, Ind. Born in Adams County, Pa., March 3, 1763. Delegate to Indiana state constitutional convention, 1816; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1821-22. Quaker. Died in Randolph County, Ind., February 28, 1830 (age 66 years, 362 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Grandfather of Elihu Cox (1812-1888).
  Warder Cresson — of Pennsylvania. U.S. Consul in Jerusalem, 1844-56. Quaker; later Jewish. Burial location unknown.
  Edward Darlington (1755-1825) — of Birmingham, Chester County, Pa. Born in East Bradford, Chester County, Pa., June 13, 1755. Member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1802-04, 1811-13. Quaker. English ancestry. Died in Birmingham, Chester County, Pa., April 1, 1825 (age 69 years, 292 days). Interment at Pikeland Friends Burial Ground, Pikeland, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Darlington and Hannah (Brinton) Darlington; married, March 8, 1781, to Hannah Townsend (1760-1826); father of William Darlington (1782-1863); uncle of Isaac Darlington, Esther Darlington (1793-1877; who married James B. Roberts), Edward Darlington and William Darlington (1804-1879); grandfather of Edward C. Darlington; granduncle of Smedley Darlington; second great-granduncle of Smedley Darlington Butler and Darlington Hoopes (1896-1989).
  Political family: Darlington-Butler family of West Chester, Pennsylvania.
  William Darlington (1782-1863) — of West Chester, Chester County, Pa. Born in Birmingham, Chester County, Pa., April 28, 1782. Physician; botanist; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 2nd District, 1815-17, 1819-23; Chester County Prothonotary and Clerk, 1827-30; among the founders of the West Chester Railroad; president, Bank of Chester County; delegate to Whig National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1839. Quaker; later Episcopalian. English ancestry. Died in West Chester, Chester County, Pa., April 23, 1863 (age 80 years, 360 days). Interment at Oaklands Cemetery, West Chester, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Darlington (1755-1825) and Hannah (Townsend) Darlington (1760-1826); married, June 1, 1808, to Catherine Lacey (1785-1847); father of Jane Darlington (1817-1895; who married Henry S. Evans) and Edward C. Darlington; first cousin of Isaac Darlington, Esther Darlington (1793-1877; who married James B. Roberts), Edward Darlington (1795-1884) and William Darlington; first cousin once removed of Smedley Darlington (1827-1899); first cousin thrice removed of Smedley Darlington Butler and Darlington Hoopes.
  Political family: Darlington-Butler family of West Chester, Pennsylvania.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Dickinson (1732-1808) — also known as "Penman of the Revolution" — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa.; Wilmington, New Castle County, Del. Born near Trappe, Talbot County, Md., November 13, 1732. Planter; lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1774-76; Delegate to Continental Congress from Delaware, 1779; member of Delaware state legislative council from New Castle County, 1781; President of Delaware, 1781-83; President of Pennsylvania, 1782-85; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; member of Delaware state senate from New Castle County, 1793. Quaker; later Episcopalian. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died in Wilmington, New Castle County, Del., February 14, 1808 (age 75 years, 93 days). Interment at Friends Burial Ground, Wilmington, Del.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Dickinson and Mary (Cadwalader) Dickinson; brother of Philemon Dickinson (1739-1809); married, July 19, 1770, to Mary 'Polly' Norris.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Thomas Earle — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Liberty candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1840. Quaker. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Mary Hussey; grandfather of George Howard Earle, Jr.; great-grandfather of George Howard Earle III (1890-1974).
  Political family: Earle family of Philadelphia and Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania.
  Edwin Bell Forsythe (1916-1984) — also known as Edwin B. Forsythe — of Moorestown, Burlington County, N.J. Born in Westtown, Chester County, Pa., January 17, 1916. Republican. Mayor of Moorestown, N.J., 1957-62; candidate for New Jersey state house of assembly from Burlington County, 1961; member of New Jersey state senate, 1964-70 (Burlington County 1964-65, District 4 1966-67, District 4-B 1968-70); resigned 1970; delegate to New Jersey state constitutional convention, 1966; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1968; U.S. Representative from New Jersey, 1970-84 (6th District 1970-83, 13th District 1983-84); died in office 1984. Quaker. Died in Moorestown, Burlington County, N.J., March 29, 1984 (age 68 years, 72 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Union Street Friends Cemetery, Medford, N.J.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Joseph Ridgway Grundy (1863-1961) — also known as Joseph R. Grundy — of Bristol, Bucks County, Pa. Born in Camden, Camden County, N.J., January 13, 1863. Republican. Woollen manufacturer; banker; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1900, 1908, 1920, 1924, 1928, 1936, 1944; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1929-30. Quaker. Died in 1961 (age about 98 years). Interment at Beechwood Cemetery, Hulmeville, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of William H. Grundy and Mary Lamb (Ridgway) Grundy.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  David Garfield Harry (1880-1955) — also known as David G. Harry — of Pylesville, Harford County, Md. Born in Pylesville, Harford County, Md., June 11, 1880. Republican. Farmer; insurance executive; member of Maryland state senate, 1924-47; delegate to Republican National Convention from Maryland, 1940 (member, Credentials Committee); candidate for U.S. Representative from Maryland 2nd District, 1946. Quaker. Member, Grange; Freemasons. Died in York County, Pa., December 12, 1955 (age 75 years, 184 days). Interment at Fawn Grove Friends Cemetery, Fawn Grove, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of David Harry (1829-1903) and Mariah J. (Warner) Harry; married, December 5, 1908, to Sara McIntire Lanius (1880-1947).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Darlington Hoopes (1896-1989) — of Reading, Berks County, Pa. Born in Vale, Harford County, Md., September 11, 1896. Socialist. Lawyer; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1930-36; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1944; candidate for President of the United States, 1952, 1956; candidate for U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 14th District, 1952, 1958; delegate to Socialist National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1960. Quaker. Member, American Bar Association; Eagles; NAACP. Died September 25, 1989 (age 93 years, 14 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Price Hoopes (1860-1938) and Elizabeth Leora (Tucker) Hoopes (1866-1939); married, October 22, 1921, to Hannah Lippincott Fouke (1898-1923); married, October 16, 1925, to Hazelette Miller (1898-1996); father of Darlington Hoopes, Jr. (1927-); great-grandnephew of Isaac Darlington and William Darlington (1804-1879); second great-grandnephew of Edward Darlington (1755-1825); first cousin thrice removed of William Darlington (1782-1863) and Edward Darlington (1795-1884); second cousin twice removed of Edward C. Darlington and Smedley Darlington; fourth cousin of Smedley Darlington Butler.
  Political family: Darlington-Butler family of West Chester, Pennsylvania.
  Darlington Hoopes, Jr. (b. 1927) — of Berks County, Pa. Born in Norristown, Montgomery County, Pa., January 1, 1927. Lawyer; Socialist candidate for Pennsylvania state senate 11th District, 1956; delegate to Socialist National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1960; member of Pennsylvania Democratic State Committee, 1968-2009. Quaker. Still living as of 2009.
  Relatives: Son of Darlington Hoopes (1896-1989).
  Political family: Darlington-Butler family of West Chester, Pennsylvania.
  Charles Humphreys (1714-1786) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Haverford, Delaware County, Pa., September 19, 1714. Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1774-76. Quaker. Voted against the Declaration of Independence because he was a Quaker and opposed to war. Died in Haverford, Delaware County, Pa., March 11, 1786 (age 71 years, 173 days). Interment at Old Haverford Meeting House Cemetery, Haverford, Pa.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John Joseph Lincoln, Sr. (1865-1948) — also known as John J. Lincoln — of McDowell County, W.Va. Born near Rising Sun, Lehigh County, Pa., October 11, 1865. Republican. Mining engineer; Presidential Elector for West Virginia, 1928. Quaker. Died in Elkhorn, McDowell County, W.Va., January 28, 1948 (age 82 years, 109 days). Interment at Newtown Cemetery, Newtown, Pa.
  Jonathan Lindley (1756-1828) — Born near Philadelphia (unknown county), Pa., June 15, 1756. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1786; territorial court judge in Indiana, 1814; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1816-17. Quaker. Founder of Terre Haute, Ind. Died in Orange County, Ind., April 5, 1828 (age 71 years, 295 days). Interment at Old Lick Creek Quaker Cemetery, Chambersburg, Ind.
  William Thacher Longstreth (1920-2003) — also known as W. Thacher Longstreth — of Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Haverford, Delaware County, Pa., November 4, 1920. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; advertising business; candidate for mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1955, 1971. Quaker. Member, Urban League. Died, of a pulmonary embolism, while hospitalized for pneumonia and suffering from Parkinson's disease, in Naples Community Hospital, Naples, Collier County, Fla., April 11, 2003 (age 82 years, 158 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Collins Longstreth and Nella (Thacher) Longstreth; married, June 21, 1941, to Anne Strawbridge Claghorn (1921?-2008).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Albert Branson Maris (1893-1989) — of Yeadon, Delaware County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., December 19, 1893. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; chair of Delaware County Democratic Party, 1924-30; member of Pennsylvania Democratic State Central Committee, 1930-34; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, 1936-38; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit, 1938-58; took senior status 1958. Quaker. Member, American Bar Association; Federal Bar Association; American Judicature Society. Died February 7, 1989 (age 95 years, 50 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Wood Maris and Elma (Branson) Maris.
  See also federal judicial profile
  Thomas Masters (d. 1723) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1707-09. Quaker. Died in 1723. Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Joseph McMinn (1758-1824) — also known as "The Quaker Governor" — of Tennessee. Born in Chester County, Pa., June 27, 1758. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; delegate to Tennessee state constitutional convention, 1796; member of Tennessee state senate, 1796-98, 1805-12; Speaker of the Tennessee State Senate, 1805-11; Governor of Tennessee, 1815-21. Quaker. Died October 17, 1824 (age 66 years, 112 days). Interment at Shiloh Presbyterian Cemetery, Calhoun, Tenn.
  McMinn County, Tenn. is named for him.
  The city of McMinnville, Tennessee, is named for him.
  Anthony Morris (1654-1721) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Stepney, London, England, August 23, 1654. Brewer; preacher; mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1703-04. Quaker. English ancestry. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., October 24, 1721 (age 67 years, 62 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Father of Anthony Morris; great-grandfather of Samuel Powel (1738-1793).
  Political families: Shippen-Middleton family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Morris-Willing family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Anthony Morris (c.1682-1763) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in London, England, about 1682. Brewer; mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1738-39. Quaker. English ancestry. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., September 23, 1763 (age about 81 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Anthony Morris and Elizabeth (Watson) Morris; grandfather of Samuel Powel (1738-1793).
  Political families: Shippen-Middleton family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Morris-Willing family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Samuel Edgar Nicholson (1862-1934) — of Howard County, Ind.; Richmond, Wayne County, Ind.; Media, Delaware County, Pa. Born near Elizabethtown, Bartholomew County, Ind., June 29, 1862. Republican. Farmer; school teacher; newspaper editor and publisher; real estate and insurance business; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1895-97. Quaker. Member, Anti-Saloon League. Died in Media, Delaware County, Pa., April 17, 1934 (age 71 years, 292 days). Interment at Middletown Friends Meeting Cemetery, Lima, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Nicholson and Rhoda (Holliday) Nicholson; married 1889 to Rhoda Elma Parker.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alexander Mitchell Palmer (1872-1936) — also known as A. Mitchell Palmer; "The Fighting Quaker" — of Stroudsburg, Monroe County, Pa.; Washington, D.C. Born near White Haven, Luzerne County, Pa., May 4, 1872. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 26th District, 1909-15; member of Democratic National Committee from Pennsylvania, 1912-20; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1912 (speaker), 1916 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee); candidate for U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1914; U.S. Attorney General, 1919-21; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1920; delegate to Democratic National Convention from District of Columbia, 1932. Quaker. Member, Phi Kappa Psi. Instigator of the "Palmer Raids" in 1919-20, in which over 10,000 legal immigrants were arrested and held for deportation; most were eventually released. Died in Washington, D.C., May 11, 1936 (age 64 years, 7 days). Interment at Laurelwood Cemetery, Stroudsburg, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel B. Palmer and Caroline (Albert) Palmer; married, November 23, 1898, to Roberta Bartlett Dixon (died 1922); married, August 29, 1923, to Margaret Fallon Burrall.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS A. Mitchell Palmer (built 1943, scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Edward Shippen (1639-1712) — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.; Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Methley, Yorkshire, England, March 5, 1639. Merchant; mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1701-03. Quaker. English ancestry. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., October 2, 1712 (age 73 years, 211 days). Interment at Old Pine Street Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of William Shippen and Mary Shippen; married 1671 to Elizabeth Lybrand (1643-1688); married 1689 to Rebecca (Howard) Richardson (died 1704); married 1704 to Esther (Wilcox) James (died 1724); grandfather of Edward Shippen (1703-1781), Anne Nancy Shippen (1710-1791; who married Charles Willing) and William Shippen (1712-1801); great-grandfather of Edward Shippen (1729-1806) and Thomas Willing (1731-1821); second great-grandfather of Charles Willing Byrd; third great-grandfather of John Brown Francis and Edward Shippen (1823-1904); fourth great-grandfather of Edward Overton, Jr. and Bertha Shippen Irving; fifth great-grandfather of James Rieman Macfarlane and Francis Fisher Kane.
  Political families: Shippen-Middleton family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Morris-Willing family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Benjamin Shoemaker (1704-c.1767) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Germantown, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., August 3, 1704. Merchant; mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1743-44, 1752-53, 1760-61. Quaker. German ancestry. Died about 1767 (age about 63 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Father of Samuel Shoemaker (1724?-1800).
  See also Wikipedia article
  William Cameron Sproul (1870-1928) — also known as William C. Sproul — of Chester, Delaware County, Pa. Born in Octoraro, Lancaster County, Pa., September 16, 1870. Republican. Farmer; manufacturer; journalist; member of Pennsylvania state senate 9th District, 1897-1919; resigned 1919; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1916, 1920, 1924; Governor of Pennsylvania, 1919-23; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1920. Quaker. Member, American Philosophical Society; Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Xi; Phi Kappa Psi; Grange; Freemasons; Elks; Union League; Patriotic Order Sons of America. Died March 21, 1928 (age 57 years, 187 days). Interment at Chester Rural Cemetery, Chester, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of William Hall Sproul and Deborah Dickinson (Slokom) Sproul; married, January 21, 1892, to Emeline Wallace Roach.
  Sproul Hall, a residence hall at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, State College, Pennsylvania, is named for him.  — The Sproul State Forest, in Clinton County, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  Edwin McMasters Stanton (1814-1869) — also known as Edwin M. Stanton; "The Great Energy" — Born in Steubenville, Jefferson County, Ohio, December 19, 1814. U.S. Attorney General, 1860-61; U.S. Secretary of War, 1862-68. Quaker. Died in Washington, D.C., December 24, 1869 (age 55 years, 5 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Grandfather of Cora Van Voorhis Stanton (who married Ernest Lee Jahncke (1877-1960)).
  Political family: Jahncke-Stanton family of New Orleans, Louisiana.
  Cross-reference: Daniel E. Sickles
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the $1 U.S. Treasury note in the 1880s and 1890s.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Edwin M. Stanton: Amy Allison, Edwin Stanton, Union War Secretary — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln
  John Chew Thomas (1764-1836) — of Maryland. Born in Perryville, Cecil County, Md., October 15, 1764. Member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1796-97; U.S. Representative from Maryland 2nd District, 1799-1801. Quaker. Died near Leiperville, Delaware County, Pa., May 10, 1836 (age 71 years, 208 days). Interment at Friends Cemetery, Near Chester, Delaware County, Pa.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Isaac Weaver (1756-1820) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Chester County, Pa., 1756. Democrat. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Pennsylvania state treasurer, 1802-07; member of Pennsylvania state senate 18th District, 1815-20. Quaker. Died in 1820 (age about 64 years). Interment somewhere in Near Jefferson, Greene County, Pa.
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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