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Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace: Texas

in chronological order

  Stephen Fuller Austin (1793-1836) — also known as Stephen F. Austin; "Father of Texas" — Born in Wythe County, Va., November 3, 1793. Member of Missouri territorial legislature, 1814-19; delegate to Texas Convention of 1832 from District of San Felipe de Austin, 1832; took petition to Mexico City for the establishment of Texas as a separate Mexican state, 1832; charged with attempting revolution, and imprisoned until 1835; delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Austin, 1833; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of San Felipe de Austin, 1835; candidate for President of the Texas Republic, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1836; died in office 1836. Member, Freemasons. Died of pneumonia, in Brazoria County, Tex., December 27, 1836 (age 43 years, 54 days). Original interment at Peach Point Cemetery, Gulf Prairie, Tex.; reinterment in 1910 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Moses Austin (1761-1821) and Maria (Brown) Austin (1768-1824).
  Austin County, Tex. is named for him.
  The city of Austin, Texas, is named for him.  — Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, Texas, is named for him.  — Austin College, Sherman, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Handbook of Texas Online
  Books about Stephen F. Austin: Gregg Cantrell, Stephen F. Austin : Empresario of Texas
  Henry Smith (1788-1851) — of Texas. Born in Kentucky, May 20, 1788. Delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Columbia, 1835; Provisional Governor of Texas, 1835-36; impeached as governor by the provisional council in 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of the Treasury, 1836-38; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1840; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush. Died in Los Angeles County, Calif., March 4, 1851 (age 62 years, 288 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of James Smith and Magdalen (Woods) Smith.
  Robert Wilson (1793-1856) — also known as "Honest Bob" — of Texas. Born in Easton, Talbot County, Md., December 7, 1793. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; delegate to Texas Convention of 1832 from District of San Jacinto, 1832; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Harrisburg and Liberty, 1836-38, 1839; candidate for President of the Texas Republic, 1838, 1843; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1845. Member, Freemasons. Expelled from Texas Republic Senate, December 26, 1838, for using profanity and disclosing secrecy; subsequently returned to office. Died May 25, 1856 (age 62 years, 170 days). Original interment in private or family graveyard; reinterment at Glenwood Cemetery, Houston, Tex.
  John M. Hansford (c.1800-1844) — of Texas. Born about 1800. Member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1838-40; judge of Texas Republic, 1840-42. Resigned as judge in 1842 while being impeached over his handling of a trial arising out of the "Regulator-Moderator War" in East Texas. Killed by members of the Regulators who had seized his home, in Texas, 1844 (age about 44 years). Burial location unknown.
  Hansford County, Tex. is named for him.
  Louis P. Cooke (1811-1849) — of Texas. Born in Tennessee, 1811. Colonel in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1838-39, 1841-42; Texas Republic Secretary of the Navy, 1839-41. Charged in 1843 with the murder of Captain Mark Lewis; at trial, the jury deadlocked, and he escaped before a second trial could be held. Wounded in an Indian raid on Corpus Christi in 1844 and lost an eye. Died, of cholera, in Brownsville, Cameron County, Tex., 1849 (age about 38 years). Interment somewhere in New Orleans, La.
  Charles Edward Travis (1829-1860) — also known as Charles E. Travis — Born in Alabama, August 8, 1829. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1853-54. Court-martialed and discharged from the U.S. Cavalry, on charges of conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman, based on incidents of alleged slander, unauthorized absence, and cheating at cards. Died, of consumption (tuberculosis) in Washington County, Tex., 1860 (age about 30 years). Interment at Masonic Cemetery, Chappell Hill, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Rosanna (Cato) Travis and William Barret Travis (1809-1836).
  John Hemphill (1803-1862) — of Texas. Born in Chester County, S.C., December 18, 1803. Judge of Texas Republic, 1840; justice of Texas state supreme court, 1846-58; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1859-61; Delegate from Texas to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; died in office 1862; candidate for Senator from Texas in the Confederate Congress, 1861. When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., January 7, 1862 (age 58 years, 20 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Uncle of John James Hemphill; great-granduncle of Robert Witherspoon Hemphill (1915-1983).
  Political family: Hemphill family of Chester, South Carolina.
  Hemphill County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Louis Trezevant Wigfall (1816-1874) — also known as Louis T. Wigfall — of Texas. Born near Edgefield, Edgefield County, S.C., April 21, 1816. Democrat. Killed Thomas Bird in a duel around 1840; wounded Rep. Preston S. Brooks in another duel; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1849; member of Texas state senate, 1857; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1859-61; when the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Delegate from Texas to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Senator from Texas in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Died in Galveston, Galveston County, Tex., February 18, 1874 (age 57 years, 303 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cemetery, Galveston, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Levi Durand Wigfall (1777-1817) and Eliza (Thomson) Wigfall; married, August 22, 1844, to Charlotte Cross (1820-1893); second cousin twice removed of Francis Irenee du Pont (1873-1942).
  Political families: DuPont family of Wilmington, Delaware; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
John H. Reagan John Henninger Reagan (1818-1905) — also known as John H. Reagan — of Palestine, Anderson County, Tex. Born in Sevierville, Sevier County, Tenn., October 8, 1818. Democrat. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1847; district judge in Texas, 1852-57; U.S. Representative from Texas, 1857-61, 1875-87 (1st District 1857-61, 1875-83, 2nd District 1883-87); delegate to Texas secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Texas to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861; Confederate Postmaster General, 1861-65; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1872, 1904; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1875; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1887-91. Methodist. Arrested by Union troops in May 1865, along with Jefferson Davis, and imprisoned for several months. Died of pneumonia in Palestine, Anderson County, Tex., March 6, 1905 (age 86 years, 149 days). Interment at East Hill Cemetery, Palestine, Tex.
  John H. Reagan High School (opened 1965; renamed 2019 as Northeast High School), in Austin, Texas, was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: Library of Congress
  George Washington Jones (1828-1903) — also known as George W. Jones — of Bastrop, Bastrop County, Tex. Born in Marion County, Ala., September 5, 1828. Lawyer; Bastrop County Attorney, 1858-60; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1866; Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1866-67; removed from office as Lieutenant Governor by Gen. Philip Sheridan, 1867, for being an "impediment to Reconstruction"; U.S. Representative from Texas 5th District, 1879-83. Died in Bastrop, Bastrop County, Tex., July 11, 1903 (age 74 years, 309 days). Interment at Fairview Cemetery, Bastrop, Tex.
  Presumably named for: George Washington
  Relatives: Son of William Dandridge Claiborne Jones and Rachel (Burleson) Jones; married, August 1, 1855, to Laura Ann Mullins.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Charles W. Bryant (born c.1830) — of Harris County, Tex. Born about 1830. Delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1868-69. African ancestry. Expelled from the Texas Constitutional Convention after being accused of raping an 11-year-old girl; jailed briefly, but then the charges were dropped. Burial location unknown.
  Edmund Jackson Davis (1827-1883) — also known as Edmund J. Davis — of Texas. Born in St. Augustine, St. Johns County, Fla., October 2, 1827. Republican. District judge in Texas, 1856-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1866; Governor of Texas, 1870-74; defeated, 1873, 1880; member of Republican National Committee from Texas, 1872-74; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas 10th District, 1882. After his defeat as Governor, he refused to give up the office, and barricaded himself in the state capitol. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., February 7, 1883 (age 55 years, 128 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of Forbes N. Britton (1820?-1861).
  Cross-reference: J. Goldsteen Dupree
  Books about Edmund J. Davis: Carl H. Moneyhon, Edmund J. Davis of Texas: Civil War General, Republican Leader, Reconstruction Governor
  Thomas J. Navin — of Adrian, Lenawee County, Mich. Mayor of Adrian, Mich., 1881-82. Absconded after forging city bonds; arrested in El Paso, Texas. Burial location unknown.
  Marshall Tate Polk (1831-1884) — also known as M. T. Polk — of Bolivar, Hardeman County, Tenn. Born in Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, N.C., May 15, 1831. Democrat. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1876; Tennessee state treasurer, 1877-83. Wounded at the Battle of Shiloh, during the Civil War, and lost a leg. In 1883, a $400,000 shortfall was was discovered in the state treasury. Polk fled to Texas, was arrested there, and brought back to Nashville for trial. Charged with embezzlement, he pleaded not guilty -- his lawyer argued he was only guilty of "default of pay" -- but was convicted, sentenced to twenty years in prison, and fined. Imprisonment was delayed pending his appeal, and he died in the meantime. Died in Bolivar, Hardeman County, Tenn., February 20, 1884 (age 52 years, 281 days). Interment at Polk Cemetery, Bolivar, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Marshall Tate Polk (1805-1831) and Laura Theresa (Wilson) Polk (1808-1848); married to Evelina McNeal Bills (1836-1926); nephew of James Knox Polk and William Hawkins Polk; first cousin of Tasker Polk; second cousin of Edwin Fitzhugh Polk; third cousin of Mary Adelaide Polk (1817-1863; who married George Davis) and Richard Tyler Polk; third cousin once removed of Rufus King Polk and Frank Lyon Polk (1871-1943); third cousin twice removed of Charles Polk and Elizabeth Polk Guest; third cousin thrice removed of Raymond R. Guest; fourth cousin of Augustus Caesar Dodge; fourth cousin once removed of Trusten Polk.
  Political families: Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina; Polk family; Manly-Haywood-Polk family of Raleigh, North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Epitaph: "Every one that loveth is born of God."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
James E. Ferguson James Edward Ferguson (1871-1944) — also known as James E. Ferguson; "Pa Ferguson" — of Temple, Bell County, Tex. Born near Salado, Bell County, Tex., August 31, 1871. Democrat. Governor of Texas, 1915-17; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1916 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee). Indicted on embezzlement and other charges in 1917; soon after, was impeached by the Texas House, and removed from office by the Texas Senate. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., September 21, 1944 (age 73 years, 21 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Married, December 31, 1899, to Miriam Amanda Wallace (1875-1961).
  Cross-reference: M. M. Crane
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Thomas Lindsay Blanton (1872-1957) — also known as Thomas L. Blanton — of Abilene, Taylor County, Tex. Born in Houston, Harris County, Tex., October 25, 1872. Democrat. Lawyer; district judge in Texas 42nd District, 1908-16; U.S. Representative from Texas, 1917-29, 1930-37 (16th District 1917-19, 17th District 1919-29, 1930-37). Presbyterian. Member, Knights of Pythias; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Odd Fellows; Woodmen. Censured in 1921 for inserting a letter into the Congressional Record which contained words said to be "unspeakable, vile, foul, filthy, profane, blasphemous and obscene." A motion to expel him from the House of Representatives failed by eight votes. Indicted in 1923 for criminal libel over his claim that former U.S. Rep. Oscar Callaway had urged his frends not to buy Liberty bonds during World War I. Died in Albany, Shackelford County, Tex., August 11, 1957 (age 84 years, 290 days). Interment at Albany Cemetery, Albany, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Lindsay Blanton; brother of Annie Webb Blanton (1870-1945); married to May Louise Matthews.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  John Bowden Connally, Jr. (1917-1993) — also known as John B. Connally — of Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Tex. Born near Floresville, Wilson County, Tex., February 27, 1917. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1956, 1964; Governor of Texas, 1963-69; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1971-72; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1980. Methodist. Shot and wounded in Dallas, Tex., November 22, 1963, in the same volley of gunfire that killed President John F. Kennedy. Prosecuted for bribery conspiracy in connection with milk price supports; acquitted. Died of pulmonary fibrosis, in Methodist Hospital, Houston, Harris County, Tex., June 15, 1993 (age 76 years, 108 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.; statue at Sam Houston Park, Houston, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of John Bowden Connally, Sr. and Lela (Wright) Connally.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Bullock (1929-1999) — also known as Bob Bullock — of Texas. Born in Hillsboro, Hill County, Tex., July 10, 1929. Democrat. Member of Texas state house of representatives; elected 1956, 1958; secretary of state of Texas, 1971-72; Texas state comptroller, 1975-90; Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1991-99. Investigated by a grand jury in 1978, but no indictment resulted. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., June 18, 1999 (age 69 years, 343 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Henry Barbosa Gonzalez (1916-2000) — also known as Henry B. Gonzalez — of San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex. Born in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., May 3, 1916. Democrat. Member of Texas state senate, 1956-61; candidate in primary for Governor of Texas, 1958; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Texas, 1961; U.S. Representative from Texas 20th District, 1961-99; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1964, 1996. Catholic. Hispanic ancestry. Member, Americans for Democratic Action. Was in the motorcade in Dallas, Tex., when President John F. Kennedy was shot. In a San Antonio restaurant in 1986, he punched a man who called him a communist; he was charged with assault, but acquitted. Died, in Downtown Baptist Hospital, San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., November 28, 2000 (age 84 years, 209 days). Interment at San Fernando Cemetery #2, San Antonio, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Leonides Gonzalez and Genevieve (Barbosa) Gonzalez; married 1940 to Bertha Cuellar; father of Charles A. Gonzalez (1945-).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Claude Wright, Jr. (1922-2015) — also known as Jim Wright, Jr. — of Weatherford, Parker County, Tex.; Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Tex. Born in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Tex., December 22, 1922. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1947-49; mayor of Weatherford, Tex., 1950-54; U.S. Representative from Texas 12th District, 1955-89; resigned 1989; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1987-89; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1980, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Texas, 1961. Presbyterian. He was subject of an investigation by the House Ethics Committee in 1989; it appeared from the report that he had evaded limits on gifts and speaking fees; resigned under fire in June, 1989. Died in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Tex., May 6, 2015 (age 92 years, 135 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Albert Garza Bustamante (b. 1935) — also known as Albert G. Bustamante — of Laredo, Webb County, Tex. Born in Asherton, Dimmit County, Tex., April 8, 1935. Democrat. School teacher; Bexar County Commissioner, 1973-78; Bexar County Judge, 1979-84; U.S. Representative from Texas 23rd District, 1985-93; defeated, 1992. Catholic. Hispanic ancestry. Convicted in 1993 on racketeering and bribery charges, and sentenced to prison. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Married to Rebecca Pounders.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier
  Henry Gabriel Cisneros (b. 1947) — also known as Henry G. Cisneros — of San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex. Born in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., June 11, 1947. Mayor of San Antonio, Tex., 1981-89; U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, 1993-97. Hispanic ancestry. In 1995, an independent counsel was appointed to investigate allegations that he had made false statements to the FBI about payments he made to his mistress; indicted in 1997 on 18 counts of conspiracy, making false statements, and obstruction of justice; pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of lying to the FBI, and was fined $10,000; pardoned in 2001 by President Bill Clinton. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Son of George Cisneros and Elvira Cisneros; married 1969 to Mary Alice Perez (1949?-).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Henry Cisneros: Mayor : An Inside View of San Antonio Politics, 1981-1995 (1997)
  Books about Henry Cisneros: Elizabeth Coonrod Martinez, Henry Cisneros : Mexican-American Leader (for young readers)
  Jack Harvard (b. 1946) — of Plano, Collin County, Tex. Born October 23, 1946. Republican. Banker; mayor of Plano, Tex., 1982-90; candidate in primary for Texas state senate 2nd District, 1992. Indicted in August 1995, along with David B. McCall, Jr. and others, on federal bank fraud charges relating to $25 million in loans; pleaded guilty in September 1996 to one count of providing false information on one loan; sentenced to three years in prison. Still living as of 1996.
Drew Nixon Drew Nixon (b. 1959) — of Carthage, Panola County, Tex. Born November 21, 1959. Republican. Real estate sales; accountant; insurance business; member of Texas state senate 3rd District, 1995-2000; arrested in February 1997, after he offered money to a police officer posing as a prostitute; a loaded revolver was found under the seat of his car, though he had no concealed hangun permit; pleaded guilty and sentenced to six months in jail. Baptist. Still living as of 2000.
  See also OurCampaigns candidate detail — Texas Legislators Past & Present
  Image source: Texas Legislative Reference Library
  Randal Tye Thomas (b. 1978) — also known as Tye Thomas; Skip Thomas — of Gun Barrel City, Henderson County, Tex.; The Colony, Denton County, Tex. Born in a hospital at Terrell, Kaufman County, Tex., August 23, 1978. Republican. Mayor, Gun Barrel City, Tex., 2000-2001, resigned 2001; Presidential Elector for Texas, 2000; youngest mayor in Texas; indicted for misdemeanor perjury, and arrested for public intoxication, 2001. Methodist. Still living as of 2003.
  Róger Calero (b. 1969) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Nicaragua, 1969. Socialist. Not U.S. citizen; meat packer; journalist; convicted of sale of marijuana, 1988; arrested in 2002, at the Houston airport, while returning from Cuba, and jailed, while deportation proceedings were started, but released in 2003; Socialist Workers candidate for President of the United States, 2004, 2008; Socialist Workers candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 2006; Socialist Workers candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 15th District, 2010. Nicaraguan ancestry. Still living as of 2010.
  See also Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Kevin Patrick Brady (b. 1955) — also known as Kevin Brady — of The Woodlands, Montgomery County, Tex. Born in Vermillion, Clay County, S.Dak., April 11, 1955. Republican. Member of Texas state house of representatives 15th District, 1991-96; U.S. Representative from Texas 8th District, 1997-; arrested on October 7, 2005, near Vermillion, S.D., and charged with driving while intoxicated. Catholic. Member, Rotary. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier
  Thomas Dale DeLay (b. 1947) — also known as Tom DeLay; "The Hammer"; "Hot Tub Tom" — of Lake Jackson, Brazoria County, Tex.; Sugar Land, Fort Bend County, Tex. Born in Laredo, Webb County, Tex., April 8, 1947. Republican. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1979-85; U.S. Representative from Texas 22nd District, 1985-; delegate to Republican National Convention from Texas, 1988; indicted in 2005 on criminal conspiracy and money laundering charges; the conspiracy charge was later dismissed; trial pending. Baptist. Member, Rotary. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier — Encyclopedia of American Loons
  Books by Tom DeLay: No Retreat, No Surrender : One American's Fight, with Stephen Mansfield (2007)
  Critical books about Tom DeLay: Lou Dubose & Jan Reid, The Hammer : God, Money, and the Rise of the Republican Congress
  Randolph Blake Farenthold (b. 1961) — also known as R. Blake Farenthold — Born in Corpus Christi, Nueces County, Tex., December 12, 1961. Republican. Lawyer; radio commentator; U.S. Representative from Texas 27th District, 2011-18; resigned 2018; sued in 2014 by a former staffer, alleging sexual harassment, a hostile work environment, and that she was fired in retaliation for complaints; the case was settled out of court with $84,000 in public funds; in December 2017, another former staffer made further detailed allegations of his behavior; resigned in April 2018. Still living as of 2018.
  Relatives: Son of George Randolph 'Randy' Farenthold and Mary Sue (Ogg) Farenthold.
  See also congressional biography — Wikipedia article
  Stephen Ernest Stockman (b. 1956) — also known as Steve Stockman — of Beaumont, Jefferson County, Tex. Born in Bloomfield Hills, Oakland County, Mich., November 14, 1956. Republican. Accountant; U.S. Representative from Texas 9th District, 1995-97; defeated, 1992 (9th District), 1996 (9th District), 2006 (22nd District); candidate in primary for Texas railroad commissioner, 1998; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Texas, 2014; arrested in March 2017 and charged in federal court on multiple counts, including obtaining $1.25 millon under false pretenses, money laundering, making false statements to the FEC, not reporting income on his tax return; tried starting in January 2018; convicted in April of 23 felonies; sentenced to ten years in prison and ordered to pay more than $1 million restitution. Baptist. Member, National Rifle Association. Still living as of 2020.
  Relatives: Married 1988 to Patti Ferguson.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — OurCampaigns candidate detail — Encyclopedia of American Loons
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