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Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace: South Carolina

in chronological order

  Alexander Moultrie (1750-1807) — Born in Charleston, Charleston District (now Charleston County), S.C., July 2, 1750. South Carolina state attorney general, 1776-92; impeached for embezzling state money into the Yazoo Land Company, and resigned. Died in Charleston, Charleston District (now Charleston County), S.C., August, 1807 (age 57 years, 0 days). Interment at St. Philip's Churchyard, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Moultrie (1702-1771) and Elizabeth (Wilkins) Moultrie (1705-1776); half-brother of William Moultrie (1730-1805); married, May 24, 1772, to Catherine Judith Lennox (1749-1814).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Blair (1786-1834) — of South Carolina. Born in The Waxhaws, Lancaster County, S.C., September 26, 1786. Democrat. Planter; sheriff; U.S. Representative from South Carolina, 1821-22, 1829-34 (9th District 1821-22, 8th District 1829-34); resigned 1822; died in office 1834; in 1832, he assaulted newspaper editor Duff Green, breaking some bones, and fined $350. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Washington, D.C., April 1, 1834 (age 47 years, 187 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Preston Smith Brooks (1819-1857) — also known as Preston S. Brooks — of Ninety Six, Edgefield District (now Greenwood County), S.C. Born in Edgefield, Edgefield District (now Edgefield County), S.C., August 5, 1819. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1844; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 4th District, 1853-56, 1856-57; died in office 1857. Suffered a hip wound in a duel with Louis T. Wigfall, 1839, and could walk only with a cane for the rest of his life. In May, 1856, furious over an anti-slavery speech, he went to the Senate and beat Senator Charles Sumner with a cane, causing severe injuries; an attempt to expel him from Congress failed for lack of the necessary two-thirds vote, but he resigned; re-elected to his own vacancy. Died in Washington, D.C., January 27, 1857 (age 37 years, 175 days). Interment at Willow Brook Cemetery, Edgefield, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Whitefield Brooks and Mary P. (Carroll) Brooks; married 1841 to Caroline Means (1820-1843); married 1843 to Martha Means; cousin *** of Milledge Luke Bonham (1813-1890).
  Political family: Bonham family of Edgefield, South Carolina.
  Cross-reference: L. M. Keitt
  Brooks County, Ga. is named for him.
  The city of Brooksville, Florida, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Laurence Massillon Keitt (1824-1864) — also known as L. M. Keitt — of Orangeburg, Orangeburg District (now Orangeburg County), S.C. Born in Orangeburg District (part now in Calhoun County), S.C., October 4, 1824. Democrat. Planter; lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1848; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 3rd District, 1853-55, 1855-56, 1856-60; censured by the House in 1856 for aiding Rep. Preston S. Brooks in his caning attack on Sen. Charles Sumner; resigned; re-elected to his seat within a month; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Orange, 1860-62; Delegate from South Carolina to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Mortally wounded at the battle of Cold Harbor, and died the next day, near Richmond (unknown county), Va., June 4, 1864 (age 39 years, 244 days). Interment at West End Cemetery, St. Matthews, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of George Keitt (1794-1861) and Mary Magdaleine (Wannamaker) Keitt (1805-1848); nephew of John Jacob Wannamaker (1801-1864); first cousin once removed of William Whetstone Wannamaker, Jr.; first cousin twice removed of William Whetstone Wannamaker III.
  Political family: Wannamaker family of Orangeburg, South Carolina.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Chesnut, Jr. (1815-1885) — of Camden, Kershaw District (now Kershaw County), S.C. Born near Camden, Kershaw County, S.C., January 18, 1815. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1842; member of South Carolina state senate, 1854; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1858-60; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Kershaw, 1860-62; Delegate from South Carolina to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; candidate for Senator from South Carolina in the Confederate Congress, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1868, 1872. When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Died in Camden, Kershaw County, S.C., February 1, 1885 (age 70 years, 14 days). Interment at Knights Hill Cemetery, Camden, S.C.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of Stephen Decatur Miller (1787-1838).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  George Alfred Trenholm (1807-1876) — also known as George A. Trenholm — of South Carolina. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., February 25, 1807. Democrat. Banker; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1852-56, 1874; Confederate Secretary of the Treasury, 1864-65. Arrested by Union forces in 1865, and imprisoned at Fort Pulaski, Tennessee, until October. Died in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., December 9, 1876 (age 69 years, 288 days). Interment at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of William Trenholm (1772-1824) and Elizabeth Irene (De Griffin) Trenholm (1781-1824); married 1828 to Anna Helen Holmes (1810-1885); father of William Lee Trenholm (1836-1901).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Andrew Gordon Magrath (1813-1893) — of Charleston, Charleston District (now Charleston County), S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., February 8, 1813. U.S. District Judge for South Carolina, 1856-60; resigned 1860; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from St. Philips' & St. Michael's, 1860-61; resigned 1861; secretary of state of South Carolina, 1860-62; Governor of South Carolina, 1864-65. Ousted as Governor by Union authorities in 1865 and imprisoned. Died in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., April 9, 1893 (age 80 years, 60 days). Interment at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.
  See also federal judicial profile
  Benjamin Ryan Tillman (1847-1918) — also known as Benjamin R. Tillman; "Pitchfork Ben"; "The One-Eyed Plowboy" — of Trenton, Edgefield County, S.C. Born in Edgefield District (now Edgefield County), S.C., August 11, 1847. Democrat. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lost an eye in 1864; farmer; Governor of South Carolina, 1890-94; delegate to South Carolina state constitutional convention, 1895; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1895-1918; died in office 1918; in Februry, 1902, he accused fellow South Carolina senator John McLaurin, of accepting a bribe (in the form of federal patronage) to support a treaty; McLaurin called Tillman a liar, and the two came to blows on the Senate floor; both were censured by the Senate; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1904, 1912 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1916; member of Democratic National Committee from South Carolina, 1912-16. English ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., July 3, 1918 (age 70 years, 326 days). Interment at Ebenezer Cemetery, Trenton, S.C.; statue at State House Grounds, Columbia, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Ryan Tillman, Sr. and Sophia (Hancock) Tillman; brother of George Dionysius Tillman (1826-1902); married 1868 to Sallie Starke.
  Cross-reference: Frazier B. Baker
  Tillman County, Okla. is named for him.
  Politician named for him: Ben T. Leppard
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Books about Ben Tillman: Stephen Kantrowitz, Ben Tillman & the Reconstruction of White Supremacy
John L. McLaurin John Lowndes McLaurin (1860-1934) — also known as John L. McLaurin — of Bennettsville, Marlboro County, S.C. Born in Marlboro County, S.C., May 9, 1860. Democrat. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1890-91; South Carolina state attorney general, 1891-97; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 6th District, 1892-97; resigned 1897; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1897-1903; in Februry, 1902, he was accused, by fellow South Carolina senator Ben Tillman, of accepting a bribe (in the form of federal patronage) to support a treaty; he called Tillman a liar, and the two came to blows on the Senate floor; both were censured by the Senate; member of South Carolina state senate from Marlboro County, 1913-14; South Carolina Warehouse Commissioner, 1915-17. Died in Bennettsville, Marlboro County, S.C., July 20, 1934 (age 74 years, 72 days). Interment at McCall Cemetery, Bennettsville, S.C.
  Cross-reference: Frazier B. Baker
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, July, 1897
  Eugene S. Blease (1877-1963) — of Newberry, Newberry County, S.C. Born in Newberry County, S.C., January 28, 1877. Democrat. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1901-02, 1922-24; member of South Carolina state senate, 1905-06; mayor of Newberry, S.C., 1920-21; justice of South Carolina state supreme court, 1927-31; chief justice of South Carolina state supreme court, 1931-34; resigned 1934; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1942; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1944. Methodist. On September 8, 1905, he shot and killed his brother-in-law, Joe Ben Coleman, in Saluda, S.C.; charged with murder, he pleaded self-defense and was found not guilty. Died December 27, 1963 (age 86 years, 333 days). Interment at Rosemont Cemetery, Newberry, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Horatio Blease and Elizabeth (Satterwhite) Blease; half-brother of Coleman Livingston Blease (1868-1942).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edward James Dennis (c.1876-1930) — also known as E. J. Dennis — of Berkeley County, S.C. Born about 1876. Member of South Carolina state senate from Berkeley County, 1911-14, 1927-30; died in office 1930. Tried and acquitted in 1929 for conspiracy to violate the alcohol prohibition law. Shot and mortally wounded by W. L. Thornley, on the street in front of the post office in Moncks Corner, S.C., and died the next day in a hospital at Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., July 25, 1930 (age about 54 years). Burial location unknown.
  Harry Shuler Dent (1930-2007) — also known as Harry S. Dent — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in St. Matthews, Calhoun County, S.C., February 21, 1930. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Korean conflict; South Carolina Republican state chair, 1965-68; special counsel and political advisor to President Richard M. Nixon; pleaded guilty in 1974 to a federal campaign finance violation, and sentenced to one month probation. Baptist. Member, Phi Alpha Delta; Pi Kappa Alpha. Died, from complications of Alzheimer's disease, in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., September 28, 2007 (age 77 years, 219 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Hampton N. Dent and Sallie P. Dent; married to Betty Francis.
  See also NNDB dossier
  John Wilson Jenrette, Jr. (b. 1936) — also known as John W. Jenrette, Jr. — of South Carolina. Born in South Carolina, May 19, 1936. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state legislature, 1970; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 6th District, 1975-80. Implicated in the Abscam sting, in which FBI agents impersonating Arab businessmen offered bribes to political figures; indicted and convicted on bribery conspiracy charges in 1980 and sentenced to prison. Still living as of 1998.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Charles Tyrone Courtney (b. 1952) — also known as Ty Courtney — of Spartanburg, Spartanburg County, S.C. Born in Spartanburg, Spartanburg County, S.C., January 4, 1952. Lawyer; municipal judge in South Carolina, 1981-82; member of South Carolina state senate, 1991-2000. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Jaycees; Lions. Tried and convicted in June 2000 on federal charges of bank fraud, mail fraud, and making false statements in a loan application. Still living as of 2000.
  Marshall Clement Sanford, Jr. (b. 1960) — also known as Mark Sanford; "The Love Gov" — of South Carolina. Born in Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Fla., March 28, 1960. Republican. U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1st District, 1995-2001; Governor of South Carolina, 2003-11. In June 2009, he disappeared from the state capital and was unavailable for several days; his office said he was "hiking the Appalachian Trail." In truth, he had gone to Argentina for an extramarital affair; the scandal ended his chances as a presidential candidate. Still living as of 2011.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article
  Johnnie M. Smith (born c.1934) — of Greenville, Greenville County, S.C.; Simpsonville, Greenville County, S.C. Born about 1934. Republican. Bishop; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 1988. African ancestry. Arrested in 2004 and charged with sexually assaulting a 12-year-old girl in 1973. Still living as of 2004.
  Addison Graves Wilson (b. 1947) — also known as Joe Wilson — of West Columbia, Lexington County, S.C.; Springdale, Lexington County, S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., July 31, 1947. Republican. Staff for U.S. Sen. Strom Thurmond, and for U.S. Rep. Floyd Spence; lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 1972, 2008; member of South Carolina state senate, 1984-2001; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 2nd District, 2001-; rebuked by the House of Representatives in September, 2009, for a breach of decorum; he had shouted "You Lie!" during an address by President Barack Obama. Presbyterian. Still living as of 2018.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
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