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Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace: North Carolina

in chronological order

  Memucan Hunt — of Granville County, N.C. Member of North Carolina state senate from Granville County, 1777, 1779-81, 1788; North Carolina state treasurer, 1784-87. In 1786, charges of misconduct were brought against him and heard by the Legislature in joint session; two days later, he was defeated for re-election. Burial location unknown.
  Robert Potter (c.1800-1842) — of Oxford, Granville County, N.C. Born near Williamsboro, Vance County, N.C., about 1800. Member of North Carolina house of commons from Granville County, 1828, 1834; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 6th District, 1829-31; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Nacogdoches, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of the Navy, 1836; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Red River and Fannin, 1840-42; died in office 1842. Resigned from the U.S. Congress in 1831 after maiming two men in a jealous rage; convicted, and sentenced to six months in prison. Expelled in 1834 from the North Carolina House for cheating at cards. Shot and killed by members of an opposing faction who surrounded his home, in Harrison County (part now in Marion County), Tex., March 2, 1842 (age about 42 years). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Marion County, Tex.; reinterment in 1928 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Potter County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Thomas Lanier Clingman (1812-1897) — also known as Thomas L. Clingman; "The Prince of Politicians" — of Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C. Born in Huntsville, Yadkin County, N.C., July 27, 1812. Democrat. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1840; U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1843-45, 1847-58 (1st District 1843-45, 1847-53, 8th District 1853-58); U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1858-61; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1868, 1876 (member, Resolutions Committee). When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Died in Morganton, Burke County, N.C., November 3, 1897 (age 85 years, 99 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Asheville, N.C.
  Clingman's Dome, a mountain on the border between Sevier County, Tennessee, and Swain County, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Thomas Bragg (1810-1872) — of Northampton County, N.C.; Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Warrenton, Warren County, N.C., November 9, 1810. Democrat. Lawyer; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1842; Governor of North Carolina, 1855-59; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1859-61; Confederate Attorney General, 1861-62. Presbyterian. When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., January 21, 1872 (age 61 years, 73 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Raleigh, N.C.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  George Davis (1820-1896) — of Wilmington, New Hanover County, N.C. Born in Porter's Neck, Pender County, N.C., March 1, 1820. Lawyer; Delegate from North Carolina to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Senator from North Carolina in the Confederate Congress, 1862-64; Confederate Attorney General, 1864-65. Episcopalian. At the end of the Civil War, with other Confederate officials, attempted to flee overseas, but turned himself in at Key West, Fla.; spent several months in prison at Fort Hamilton; pardoned in 1866. Died in Wilmington, New Hanover County, N.C., February 23, 1896 (age 75 years, 359 days). Interment at Oakdale Cemetery, Wilmington, N.C.; statue erected 1911 at Third and Market Streets, Wilmington, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Frederick Davis (1778-1846) and Sarah Isabella (Eagles) Davis (1784-1829); half-brother and fourth cousin of Horatio Davis; married, November 17, 1842, to Mary Adelaide Polk (1817-1863; first cousin once removed of Frank Lyon Polk (1871-1943); second cousin once removed of James Knox Polk and William Hawkins Polk; third cousin of Marshall Tate Polk); married, May 9, 1866, to Monimia Fairfax (1837-1889); great-grandnephew of Samuel Ashe; cousin four different ways of John Baptista Ashe (1748-1802), John Baptista Ashe (1810-1857), Thomas Samuel Ashe and William Shepperd Ashe; cousin three different ways of Alfred Moore Waddell; second cousin twice removed of William Henry Hill.
  Political families: Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina; Polk family; Manly-Haywood-Polk family of Raleigh, North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Woods Holden (1818-1892) — also known as William W. Holden — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Orange County, N.C., November 24, 1818. Newspaper editor; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1860; delegate to North Carolina secession convention, 1861; Governor of North Carolina, 1865, 1868-70; postmaster at Raleigh, N.C., 1873-81. Methodist. Impeached and removed from office as Governor in 1870, over corruption scandal. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., March 1, 1892 (age 73 years, 98 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Raleigh, N.C.
  Relatives: Married to Ann Augusta Young (1819-1852); father of Ida Augustus Holden (who married Calvin Josiah Cowles (1821-1907)); grandfather of Charles Holden Cowles.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Baldwin-Greene-Upson-Hoar family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Joseph Williams Thorne (b. 1816) — also known as J. Williams Thorne — of Chester County, Pa.; Warren County, N.C. Born in Pennsylvania, December 25, 1816. Republican. Delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1875; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1875; expelled 1875; member of North Carolina state senate; elected 1876. Expelled in 1875 from the North Carolina House as an "infidel," reportedly for his support of Darwin's theory of evolution. Interment at Longwood Cemetery, Longwood, Pa.
  James Kemp Doughton, Sr. (1884-1973) — of Sparta, Alleghany County, N.C. Born in Alleghany County, N.C., May 18, 1884. Banker; farmer; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1948-57; Speaker of the North Carolina State House of Representatives, 1951-57. Methodist. Indicted for bank fraud in 1928; tried and acquitted. Died, of pneumonia, in a hospital at Sparta, Alleghany County, N.C., March 17, 1973 (age 88 years, 303 days). Interment at Shiloh Methodist Church Cemetery, Sparta, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Rufus A. Doughton; nephew of Robert Lee Doughton (1863-1954).
  Political family: Doughton family of Sparta, North Carolina.
  Ike Franklin Andrews (1925-2010) — also known as Ike F. Andrews — of Siler City, Chatham County, N.C. Born in Bonlee, Chatham County, N.C., September 2, 1925. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; member of North Carolina state senate 13th District, 1959-60; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1961-62, 1967-72; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1964; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 4th District, 1973-85; defeated, 1984. Baptist. Member, American Bar Association; Jaycees. In October 1982, he was arrested and charged with drunk driving. Died in Carrboro, Orange County, N.C., May 10, 2010 (age 84 years, 250 days). Interment at Bonlee Baptist Church Cemetery, Bonlee, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Archie Franklin Andrews (1895-1972) and Ina (Dunlap) Andrews (1895-1987); married 1947 to Jo Anne Johnson.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James C. Green (c.1922-2000) — also known as Jimmy Green — of Clarkton, Bladen County, N.C. Born about 1922. Democrat. Member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1961-77; Speaker of the North Carolina State House of Representatives, 1975-77; Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina, 1977-85; candidate in primary for Governor of North Carolina, 1984. Presbyterian. Charged in 1983 with accepting a bribe from an undercover FBI agent, but acquitted; convicted of tax evasion in 1997, fined, and sentenced to home confinement. Died at Bladen County Hospital, Elizabethtown, Bladen County, N.C., February 4, 2000 (age about 78 years). Interment at Clarkton Cemetery, Clarkton, N.C.
  Frazier Glenn Miller, Jr. (b. 1940) — also known as Glenn Miller; "Frazier Glenn Cross"; "Rounder" — of North Carolina; Aurora, Lawrence County, Mo. Born in Springfield, Greene County, Mo., 1940. Served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam war; candidate in Democratic primary for Governor of North Carolina, 1984; candidate in Republican primary for North Carolina state senate, 1986; convicted on federal contempt of court charges in 1986; sentenced to one year in prison, but disappeared while out on bond; later captured in Missouri, along with four other Klansmen and a cache of weapons; indicted in 1987 for plotting robberies and an assassination; in a deal with prosecutors, he pleaded guilty to a weapons charge and to making threats through the mail; served three years in prison; candidate for U.S. Representative from Missouri 7th District, 2006; candidate for U.S. Senator from Missouri, 2010; on April 13, 2014, in an apparent hate crime he shot and killed three people at a Jewish community center and retirement complex in Overland Park, Kansas. Member, Ku Klux Klan. Still living as of 2014.
  Frank W. Ballance, Jr. (b. 1942) — of Warrenton, Warren County, N.C. Born in Windsor, Bertie County, N.C., February 15, 1942. Democrat. Lawyer; librarian; college professor; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1982-85; member of North Carolina state senate, 1989-2002; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1996, 2000; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 1st District, 2003-04; resigned 2004; indicted in federal court in September 2004 on federal money laundering charges for diverting state funds through a charitable foundation; pleaded guilty to one count, sentenced to four years in prison, fined $10,000, ordered to pay restitution, and disbarred. African ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  John Reid Edwards (b. 1953) — also known as John Edwards; Johnny Reid Edwards; "Silk Pony"; "The Breck Girl" — of North Carolina. Born in Seneca, Oconee County, S.C., June 10, 1953. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1999-2005; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 2000, 2004; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 2004, 2008; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 2004; in August 2008, he acknowledged an extramarital affair with filmmaker Rielle Hunter, though at first he denied having fathered her baby; this revelation discredited him and ended his political career. Methodist. In June, 2011, he was indicted in federal court on campaign finance charges, based on the argument that the donations he received in 2007-08 to cover up his affair were illegal contributions to his presidential campaign. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Married, July 30, 1977, to Mary Elizabeth Anania.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by John Edwards: Four Trials (2003) — Our Plan for America: Stronger at Home, Respected in the World, with John Kerry (2004)
  Critical books about John Edwards: Bernard Goldberg, 100 People Who Are Screwing Up America (And Al Franken Is #37) — Andrew Young, The Politician: An Insider's Account of John Edwards's Pursuit of the Presidency and the Scandal That Brought Him Down
  Michael Francis Easley (b. 1950) — also known as Mike F. Easley — of Brunswick County, N.C. Born near Rocky Mount, Nash County, N.C., March 23, 1950. Democrat. Lawyer; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1990; North Carolina state attorney general, 1993-2001; Governor of North Carolina, 2001-09; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 2004, 2008; pleaded guilty in 2010 to failing to report a 2006 helicopter ride in his campaign finance filings. Catholic. Member, Phi Gamma Delta. Still living as of 2014.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
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